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Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

September 30th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

Ourhomecyclopedi00darl 0010Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

PREFACE

We take pleasure in presenting a book to the public with an arrangement of subjects entirely different from any other published, and designed especially to save much valuable time to the housewife.

The subjects are so arranged that one has only to turn through the book, and from the headlines find each chapter in alphabetical order, making it easy to turn at once to any subject or recipe desired, without even turning to the table of contents.

The object of this book is to give housekeepers the most improved and scientific cookery as developed by the most practical schools of cookery of the present day; keeping in mind economy as far as consistent with well cooked and healthful dishes. Bad cooking is not only a waste of health but of money. This book, no doubt, will save many times its cost to each purchaser. The object being to assist the housekeeper in a practical way, the authors have not catered to the epicure, hence the highly seasoned and expensive dishes have been omitted.

Cook books previously published, have been confined to recipes only, while the general information which is so essential, has been omitted. We have taken a step forward, in giving at the commencement of each chapter, general directions that will apply to the recipes following.

To illustrate, take for instance chapter seven, “Canning Fruit.” Before giving any recipes, valuable instruction is given on those essential points, as preparing the cans, the tops, the rubbers, the kind of cans to be used, heating the fruit, and a complete table giving the quantity of sugar required per quart, and the time for boiling any kind of fruit. In the chapters on poultry, game, and marketing, full information is given on selecting meats of all kinds, where the best cuts of meat are to be found, the carving etc.

In the mechanical arrangement of this volume, the publishers have made it far excell any other cook book ever published.

The type is large and clear, the leaves are broad, and the book is so bound that it will remain open at any point desired, thus saving one’s time in frequent opening, as is the case with books of narrow pages.

The initial letters are entirely new features, and were designed and copyrighted especially for this book. The artist was instructed to represent each chapter in its initial letter. How well he has done so the reader can judge when looking through the book. So valuable and so cheap a book as this one should be owned and used (not borrowed) by every housekeeper.

If this book should be the means of bringing into the household, happiness, peace and contentment; if the husband hereafter sits at the table with a smiling and satisfied countenance, and the wife feels less of care and anxiety, then its mission will have been accomx^lished.

‘^Get a husband what he likes.

And save a thousand household strikes.”


 

Excellent Mead. Three pounds brown sugar, one pint of molasses, one-fourth pound tartaric acid; mix, pour over them two quarts boiling water, stir till dissolved. When cold, add half ounce essence sassafras and bottle. When you wish to drink it, put three tablespoonfuls of it in a tumbler, fill half full with ice water, add a little more than one-fourth teaspoonful soda. An excellent summer beverage.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1889
Publisher Detroit, Mich., The Mercantile publishing co.
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane’s cooking class by E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland – 13 in a series

September 2nd, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane’s cooking class by E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland – 13 in a series

Six little cooks

Historical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane's cooking class by  E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane's cooking class by  E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland - 12 in a series

Want a print copy of “Six Little Cooks”? There is a reprint available on Amazon and perhaps at your local library!

FIRST DAY

“Oh, Annt Jane,” said Grace, looking up quickly from the story-book she was reading, ” I wish you would teach us all how to cook! “

But here am I, the author, plunging at once into the middle of my story without a word of explanation, not even a preface. Of course, no one can understand anything about it unless I go back a little, and tell you how it began.

Aunt Jane had come to make a visit to Mrs. Yernon, Grace’s motlier, and had brought her own little girl. Amy, to spend the vacation. Next door lived Edith Lane, a very intimate friend of both the girls, and just across the street, Rose and Jessie Carroll, Grace’s cousins; and these five, witli little Mabel Vernon, made a happy company who were almost always together. Mabel was just nine years old, and the others were from ten to twelve, so there was not difference enough in their ages to prevent their being the best of playmates.

Well — as I began to say, Grace was reading about a wonderful little girl who made such remarkable things in the way of cakes and puddings, that our . young person was seized with a desire to do likewise without delay. Aunt Jane was the kindest of aunts and the best of cooks, and Grace knew that if she would take the trouble to teach them, they would be well taught.

“I should like that of all things,” said she, in answer to Grace’s exclamation, “provided your mother consents.”

“Oh, she’d be perfectly delighted,” cried Grace; “she often says she wishes she had time to teach us herself.”

“Very well, then; run and ask her if we may begin this afternoon.”

“And can’t Rose and Jessie and Edith come too?” inquired Grace eagerly. “They all want to learn, just as much as I do.”

“Not quite so fast,” said Aunt Jane, smiling. ” Suppose we begin with those in the house first, and if it works well we can invite the others afterwards.”


 

And now there is one thing more I should like to have you do. Bring a little blank book, in which you can write down the recipes we try, and if any of them should prove not to be good, we’ll cross them off without mercy.”

The book was quickly brought, and Grace wrote down from her aunt’s dictation, as follows:

No. 1. — Susan’s Cake.

Three cups flour, two of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, one cup of sour milk, three eggs, one teaspoonful soda, two of cream tartar. Two cups seeded raisins, or one of well- washed currants, added, makes a delicious fruit cake. 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1877
Topics Cookery,cbk
Publisher Chicago : Jansen, McClurg
Collection europeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Google
Book from the collections of Harvard University
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou’s house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough, (1913) – 12 in a series

August 26th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou’s house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough, (1913) – 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a series

INTRODUCTION

To My Readers:

I have tried all the recipes and the suggestions given in this book. Some of them I originated, many came from friends, a few from cooks whom I have employed. It was my wish to make a practical little book for housekeepers, because when I was a young housekeeper, just beginning, I would have been glad to have such an aid in doing things that now seem easy and simple. Nor does any housekeeper ever learn it all. If my book shall prove a sort of exchange of housekeeping wisdom, I hope you will call me your friend.

WILLY LOU.


 

Baking Powder Biscuit

One quart of flour and two teaspoonfuls of
baking powder, one-half teaspoon ful of salt, one
tablespoonful of lard, one large cup of sour cream
in which one-half teaspoonful of soda has been
stirred. Mix all together thoroughly and roll
out, cut with a small cutter, bake in a quick oven
twenty to thirty minutes.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1913
Publisher Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill Co
Collection cornellamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Contributor usage rights See terms
Language English
 
 

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Reading – The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World’s First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore by Robert Simonson- 14 in a series

March 20th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World’s First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore Robert Simonson – 14 in a series

Reading - The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore by Robert Simonson- 14 in a series

“What?”, you say? “An entire book about one cocktail?”

“Yes!”, I say. “And what a cocktail it is!”

The Old-Fashioned takes us through the long and complicated history of what is arguably America’s favorite cocktail. I know, for myself, that this has become my go-to tipple whether at home our out on the town. It is deceptively simple and when well made almost perfect. The woody bite of bourbon, a slight sweetness from your favorite sweetener (mine is maple syrup), a splash of bitter to mellow it all together and a slice of orange to complete both the taste and visual profile. Yum!

What started out as a relatively straightforward combination went through many changes over the years including the changing of ingredients, overburdening the drink with fruit and changing tastes, but a group of old-fashioned purists wrestled back the Old-Fashioned into something eloquently playable and ready to be experimented with once more. You’ll find old and new recipes here, showing you a place to start as well as excellent places to travel with your favorite cocktail.

** My version of this book was available from the Los Angeles Public Library in print and ebook versions.

From Amazon.com…

A complete history of one of the world’s most iconic cocktails–now the poster child of the modern cocktail revival–with fifty recipes for classic variations as well as contemporary updates.

No single cocktail is as iconic, as beloved, or as discussed and fought-over as the Old-Fashioned. Its formula is simple: just whiskey, bitters, sugar, and ice. But how you combine those ingredients—in what proportion, using which brands, and with what kind of garnish—is the subject of much impassioned debate.

The Old-Fashioned is the spirited, delightfully unexpected story of this renowned and essential drink: its birth as the ur-cocktail in the nineteenth century, darker days in the throes of Prohibition, re-ascension in the 1950s and 1960s (as portrayed and re-popularized by Don Draper on Mad Men), and renaissance as the star of the contemporary craft cocktail movement.

Also featured are more than forty cocktail recipes, including classic variations, regional twists, and contemporary updates from top bartenders around the country. All are accessible, delicious, and elegant in their simplicity, demonstrating the versatility and timelessness of the Old-Fashioned formula. 

With its rich history, stunning photography, and impeccable recipes, The Old-Fashioned is a celebration of one of America’s greatest bibulous achievements. It is a necessary addition to any true whiskey- or cocktail-lover’s bookshelf, and destined to become a classic on par with its namesake beverage.

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library.
Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Categories: Books, Drinks, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Reading – Milk Street: The New Home Cooking by Christopher Kimble – 6 in a series

January 25th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – Milk Street: The New Home Cooking by Christopher Kimble – 6 in a series

 

You may know Christopher Kimball from his time at America’s Test Kitchen on PBS. He brings his same precision and dedication to Milk Street, his new, individual, company and cooking school. For the most part, Milk Street is about simple, international foods, brought home to out American kitchens and done very, very well. In an effort to help the reader find success with these recipes, they are clearly laid out in great detail with hints and tips and times clearly shown. Kimball and his staff have obviously tested these recipes again and again and want to help you succeed in making them.

Scattered throughout are sections detailing tips like why oil us better for cooking omelets and scrambled eggs, why carbon steel pans might be a home cook’s best friend and how to steam cook with a foil-parchment packet.

Along with this are excellent recipes, many of which I have marked for future “testing” in my own kitchen. Some of my favorites include:

  • Curry Braised Eggs
  • Spanish Spice-Crusted Pork Tenderloin Bites (Pinchos Morunos)
  • Caramelized Pork with Orange and Sage
  • Cracked Potatoes with Vermouth, Coriander, Fennel
  • Whipped Cream Biscuits

** My version of this book was available as an eBook from the Los Angeles Public Library

From Amazon.com…

For more than twenty-five years, Christopher Kimball has promised home cooks that his recipes would work. Now, with his team of cooks and editors at Milk Street, he promises that a new approach in the kitchen can elevate the quality of your cooking far beyond anything you thought possible.

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street, the first cookbook connected to Milk Street’s public television show, delivers more than 125 new recipes arranged by type of dish: from grains and salads, to a new way to scramble eggs, to simple dinners and twenty-first-century desserts.

At Milk Street, there are no long lists of hard-to-find ingredients, strange cookware, or all-day methods. Skillet-charred Brussels sprouts, Japanese fried chicken, rum-soaked chocolate cake, Thai-style coleslaw, and Mexican chicken soup all deliver big flavors and textures without your having to learn a new culinary language.

These recipes are more than just good recipes. They teach a simpler, bolder, healthier way to cook that will change your cooking forever. And cooking will become an act of pure pleasure, not a chore.

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Categories: Baking, Books, Cooking, Food, Recipe Tags:

Reading – The Wildcrafted Cocktail: Make Your Own Foraged Syrups, Bitters, Infusions, and Garnishes by Ellen Zachos – 5 in a series

January 19th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – The Wildcrafted Cocktail: Make Your Own Foraged Syrups, Bitters, Infusions, and Garnishes by Ellen Zachos – 5 in a series

 Reading - The Wildcrafted Cocktail: Make Your Own Foraged Syrups, Bitters, Infusions, and Garnishes by Ellen Zachos - 5 in a series

I know what you’re thinking…”Another cocktail book?!?!” Well, this is just the order I completed them in, not some evil scheme to get your drunk on a weeknight. (LAUGH)

The Wildcrafted Cocktail is certainly an extremely niche book. It is few people who go out into the woods and forage the ingredients for their cocktails, yet I still enjoyed the book greatly. It was wonderful to read about all the unique ingredients you might find in your own backyard. Still, I for myself I would be a bit leery gathering plants without a bit more knowledge, and confidence, that I wasn’t poisoning myself in the process. You might want to combine this book on a really good book on backyard foraging like Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn’t Know You Could Eat, to assist you in your search. Such detailed information is far beyond the scope of The Wildcrafted Cocktail, but very necessary to be successful.

That said, there was also some great, general information on cocktails including some history of cocktails,

“What is a cocktail? The first mention of a cocktail as an alcoholic beverage dates from 1806, when it was defined as a drink composed of spirits, sugar, water, and bitters.”

and the difference between the several types of simple syrup that are used behind a well-stocked bar, 

“The difference among these syrups is not only the degree of sweetness but also the mouthfeel. A rich syrup (twice as much sugar as water) is much silkier than a simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water). A light syrup (twice as much water as sugar) is lighter and thinner on the tongue. Simple syrups are the most versatile and most commonly called for behind the bar.”

The Wildcrafted Cocktail is certainly worthwhile if only to expand your thinking about foraged ingredients and cocktails in general. Who knows? You might even have some ingredients in your very own garden that could find their way into your glass.

** My version of this book was available as an eBook from the Los Angeles Public Library

From Amazon.com…

Meet the natural lovechild of the popular local-foods movement and craft cocktail scene. It’s here to show you just how easy it is to make delicious, one-of-a-kind mixed drinks with common flowers, berries, roots, and leaves that you can find along roadsides or in your backyard. Foraging expert Ellen Zachos gets the party started with recipes for more than 50 garnishes, syrups, infusions, juices, and bitters, including Quick Pickled Daylily Buds, Rose Hip Syrup, and Chanterelle-infused Rum. You’ll then incorporate your handcrafted components into 45 surprising and delightful cocktails, such as Stinger in the Rye, Don’t Sass Me, and Tree-tini. 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies via Instagram

December 25th, 2017 Comments off

 

Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies via Instagram

Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies

From our annual cookie party, now in It’s 25th year!

Recipe: Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies

Instagram and Follow

Some of my favorite cookbooks

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Bourbon Walnut Bars via Instagram

December 23rd, 2017 Comments off

Bourbon Walnut Bars via Instagram

Bourbon Walnut Bars

From our annual cookie party, now in It’s 25th year!

Recipe: Bourbon Delight Bars

Instagram and Follow

Some of my favorite cookbooks

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Fusilli alla Vodka with Basil and Parmesan via Bon Appetit

November 4th, 2017 Comments off

I am always on the lookout for new pasta recipes to try and, despite the ubiquity of vodka sauces, I have never tried making one myself. — Douglas

Fusilli alla Vodka with Basil and Parmesan via Bon Appetit

Get the recipe here

Categories: Cooking, Food, Recipe Tags:

The Meaty, Leftovers-Filled Pasta Savored By Tuscan Cowboys via Food52

July 31st, 2017 Comments off
This meat sauce sounds delicious and different enough from our other family ragu recipes to at least give it a try. I like the use of sage and rosemary. We don’t use a lot of those herbs here although I like the flavor they bring to a dish. — Douglas
 
 

I had been living in a corner of southern Tuscany, in the Maremma, for a few months when I began noticing pasta alla buttera (translation: cowboy pasta) here and there—on countryside menus and at various sagre, outdoor food festivals that are especially good places to try regional dishes. I made a mental note to add another job-description-pasta-sauce to a quirky medley of a list that included things like spaghetti alla carbonara and pasta alla boscaiola, named after the charcoal burners and woodcutters that apparently invented and championed the dishes based on what readily available ingredients they had.

Read The Meaty, Leftovers-Filled Pasta Savored By Tuscan Cowboys via Food52



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading