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Reading – Milk Street: The New Home Cooking by Christopher Kimble – 6 in a series

January 25th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – Milk Street: The New Home Cooking by Christopher Kimble – 6 in a series

 

You may know Christopher Kimball from his time at America’s Test Kitchen on PBS. He brings his same precision and dedication to Milk Street, his new, individual, company and cooking school. For the most part, Milk Street is about simple, international foods, brought home to out American kitchens and done very, very well. In an effort to help the reader find success with these recipes, they are clearly laid out in great detail with hints and tips and times clearly shown. Kimball and his staff have obviously tested these recipes again and again and want to help you succeed in making them.

Scattered throughout are sections detailing tips like why oil us better for cooking omelets and scrambled eggs, why carbon steel pans might be a home cook’s best friend and how to steam cook with a foil-parchment packet.

Along with this are excellent recipes, many of which I have marked for future “testing” in my own kitchen. Some of my favorites include:

  • Curry Braised Eggs
  • Spanish Spice-Crusted Pork Tenderloin Bites (Pinchos Morunos)
  • Caramelized Pork with Orange and Sage
  • Cracked Potatoes with Vermouth, Coriander, Fennel
  • Whipped Cream Biscuits

** My version of this book was available as an eBook from the Los Angeles Public Library

From Amazon.com…

For more than twenty-five years, Christopher Kimball has promised home cooks that his recipes would work. Now, with his team of cooks and editors at Milk Street, he promises that a new approach in the kitchen can elevate the quality of your cooking far beyond anything you thought possible.

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street, the first cookbook connected to Milk Street’s public television show, delivers more than 125 new recipes arranged by type of dish: from grains and salads, to a new way to scramble eggs, to simple dinners and twenty-first-century desserts.

At Milk Street, there are no long lists of hard-to-find ingredients, strange cookware, or all-day methods. Skillet-charred Brussels sprouts, Japanese fried chicken, rum-soaked chocolate cake, Thai-style coleslaw, and Mexican chicken soup all deliver big flavors and textures without your having to learn a new culinary language.

These recipes are more than just good recipes. They teach a simpler, bolder, healthier way to cook that will change your cooking forever. And cooking will become an act of pure pleasure, not a chore.

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Categories: Baking, Books, Cooking, Food, Recipe Tags:

Reading – The Wildcrafted Cocktail: Make Your Own Foraged Syrups, Bitters, Infusions, and Garnishes by Ellen Zachos – 5 in a series

January 19th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – The Wildcrafted Cocktail: Make Your Own Foraged Syrups, Bitters, Infusions, and Garnishes by Ellen Zachos – 5 in a series

 Reading - The Wildcrafted Cocktail: Make Your Own Foraged Syrups, Bitters, Infusions, and Garnishes by Ellen Zachos - 5 in a series

I know what you’re thinking…”Another cocktail book?!?!” Well, this is just the order I completed them in, not some evil scheme to get your drunk on a weeknight. (LAUGH)

The Wildcrafted Cocktail is certainly an extremely niche book. It is few people who go out into the woods and forage the ingredients for their cocktails, yet I still enjoyed the book greatly. It was wonderful to read about all the unique ingredients you might find in your own backyard. Still, I for myself I would be a bit leery gathering plants without a bit more knowledge, and confidence, that I wasn’t poisoning myself in the process. You might want to combine this book on a really good book on backyard foraging like Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn’t Know You Could Eat, to assist you in your search. Such detailed information is far beyond the scope of The Wildcrafted Cocktail, but very necessary to be successful.

That said, there was also some great, general information on cocktails including some history of cocktails,

“What is a cocktail? The first mention of a cocktail as an alcoholic beverage dates from 1806, when it was defined as a drink composed of spirits, sugar, water, and bitters.”

and the difference between the several types of simple syrup that are used behind a well-stocked bar, 

“The difference among these syrups is not only the degree of sweetness but also the mouthfeel. A rich syrup (twice as much sugar as water) is much silkier than a simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water). A light syrup (twice as much water as sugar) is lighter and thinner on the tongue. Simple syrups are the most versatile and most commonly called for behind the bar.”

The Wildcrafted Cocktail is certainly worthwhile if only to expand your thinking about foraged ingredients and cocktails in general. Who knows? You might even have some ingredients in your very own garden that could find their way into your glass.

** My version of this book was available as an eBook from the Los Angeles Public Library

From Amazon.com…

Meet the natural lovechild of the popular local-foods movement and craft cocktail scene. It’s here to show you just how easy it is to make delicious, one-of-a-kind mixed drinks with common flowers, berries, roots, and leaves that you can find along roadsides or in your backyard. Foraging expert Ellen Zachos gets the party started with recipes for more than 50 garnishes, syrups, infusions, juices, and bitters, including Quick Pickled Daylily Buds, Rose Hip Syrup, and Chanterelle-infused Rum. You’ll then incorporate your handcrafted components into 45 surprising and delightful cocktails, such as Stinger in the Rye, Don’t Sass Me, and Tree-tini. 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies via Instagram

December 25th, 2017 Comments off

 

Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies via Instagram

Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies

From our annual cookie party, now in It’s 25th year!

Recipe: Peanut Butter Kiss Cookies

Instagram and Follow

Some of my favorite cookbooks

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Bourbon Walnut Bars via Instagram

December 23rd, 2017 Comments off

Bourbon Walnut Bars via Instagram

Bourbon Walnut Bars

From our annual cookie party, now in It’s 25th year!

Recipe: Bourbon Delight Bars

Instagram and Follow

Some of my favorite cookbooks

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Fusilli alla Vodka with Basil and Parmesan via Bon Appetit

November 4th, 2017 Comments off

I am always on the lookout for new pasta recipes to try and, despite the ubiquity of vodka sauces, I have never tried making one myself. — Douglas

Fusilli alla Vodka with Basil and Parmesan via Bon Appetit

Get the recipe here

Categories: Cooking, Food, Recipe Tags:

The Meaty, Leftovers-Filled Pasta Savored By Tuscan Cowboys via Food52

July 31st, 2017 Comments off
This meat sauce sounds delicious and different enough from our other family ragu recipes to at least give it a try. I like the use of sage and rosemary. We don’t use a lot of those herbs here although I like the flavor they bring to a dish. — Douglas
 
 

I had been living in a corner of southern Tuscany, in the Maremma, for a few months when I began noticing pasta alla buttera (translation: cowboy pasta) here and there—on countryside menus and at various sagre, outdoor food festivals that are especially good places to try regional dishes. I made a mental note to add another job-description-pasta-sauce to a quirky medley of a list that included things like spaghetti alla carbonara and pasta alla boscaiola, named after the charcoal burners and woodcutters that apparently invented and championed the dishes based on what readily available ingredients they had.

Read The Meaty, Leftovers-Filled Pasta Savored By Tuscan Cowboys via Food52



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

29 Egg Recipes for Much More Than Breakfast via Food52

July 18th, 2017 Comments off
“The Incredible, Edible Egg” — as the old advertisement used to say. I found several different recipes I want to try from this article. My favorites include Shakshuka Focaccia, Bacon & Egg Ramen. Savory Ris-Oat-to with Poached Egg by Ali Conklin, and Sheet Pan Eggs by Ali Slagle. To be honest, I’m still reading my way through all the recipes and I might find even more I like. — Douglas
 
 

In culinary school my cooking instructors touted the importance of eggs: The traditional chef’s toque is rumored to have 100 folds, one fold to represent the hundred ways to prepare an egg. We’d be forewarned that sometimes the skills test given during line cook interviews would simply be to cook an egg.

Regardless of technique and form, it’s undeniable that eggs are an indispensable ingredient, well suited for any time of the day. Here are 29 of our favorite ways to use them:

Read 29 Egg Recipes for Much More Than Breakfast via Food52



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

12 Ways to Take Brownies Where They’ve Never Been Before via Food52

May 22nd, 2017 Comments off

Check out these ways to kick up your brownie game. — Douglas

 
Where do your brownie loyalties lie? Are you Team Fudgy, Team Cakey, or Team In-Between-y?

I’m a fudgy-as-a-truffle gal myself (Alice Medrich’s Best Cocoa Brownies are my old faithful, preferably straight from the freezer)—but today, we’re not here to discuss that age-old question.

Instead, we’re here to take you brownie purists and turn you into brownie hedonists!!!! eccentrics. Your ordinary brownies might be extraordinarily good, but consider these tweaks—in the form of swirls, sprinkles, drops, and swooshes (smears, if you prefer)—for when you want to give your brownie a night on the town, complete with facial glitter (that’s still a thing, right?) and a thick coat of mascara.
 
Read 12 Ways to Take Brownies Where They’ve Never Been Before via Food52



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

On YouTube: Jammy Rice Pudding Recipe | Now Cook It from SortedFood

May 20th, 2017 Comments off

Rosanne loves rice passing, but I am not the biggest fan. Still, this recipe looks delicious and easy so it might just push me over the edge into making our own batch at home. The addition of the jam makes it even better. — Douglas

On YouTube: Jammy Rice Pudding Recipe | Now Cook It from SortedFood

This is the best rice pudding recipe ever thanks to the homemade blackberry jam you make to go alongside it. You’ll achieve a rich, creamy rice pudding in no time at all!

Rice Pudding Recipe

How To Make Jam

 


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Categories: Cooking, Food, Recipe, Shared Items, youtube Tags:

A Trusty Trick for Cooking Without a Recipe (& Anxiety) via Food52

May 17th, 2017 Comments off
I’m always looking for tips, tricks and rules of thumb for cooking and this article contains some great info. Learn how the fat you choose affects the taste and style of your dishes and more. — Douglas
 
Say you are making a beautiful carbonara. You’ve got the bacon crisping, the Parmesan shredded and at the ready, the pasta water simmering away, and—oh no. You used up all the olive oil making Maialino’s dreamy Olive Oil Cake! And all you’ve got on hand is… coconut oil. Drat. That won’t work!

Sure, it’ll fill the oily void, but the flavors of the dish will be all off. You might run out to buy more olive oil, or you might think of this instead as an opportunity for culinary experimentation. Up to you. Either way, it’s easy enough to tell that coconut oil isn’t exactly what the dish is calling for—and it’s certainly not what a nonna would reach for. At the same time, butter would be unusual in a stir-fry, and sesame oil very peculiar in a sauce for sole meunière.
 
Book mentioned in this article
 

An interesting link found among my daily reading

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