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Recipe: Cacio e Pepe Pasta Pie via spoon fork bacon

October 3rd, 2019 Comments off
Yum! I love Cacio e Pepe and this sounds and looks like a great way to mix things up a bit. I DO love those crunchy edges. Ummm…nibble-y bits! — Douglas
 
I love love love Cacio e Pepe. Cheese and pepper with pasta, it’s like the pasta version of grilled cheese. Simple and delicious, and you don’t really need to mess with it. We however decided to slightly mess with it. We made it into pasta pie. I love this because you get some crispy pasta on the top, but on the inside you still get all that gooey cheesy sauce. It’s a pretty great combo. Enjoy!
Read Cacio e Pepe Pasta Pie via spoon fork bacon



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6 Holiday Cookies You’ll Want to Bake, Swap, and Share on Repeat via Bon Appetit

September 21st, 2019 Comments off
My family treats Christmas cookie baking as part gladiatorial sport, part opera. The tradition started with my Italian-American grandmother, Erminia, who would push herself and her oven to the limit every December, waking up at 5 a.m. and baking until she had filled every old cookie tin and ancient Tupperware with hermit slices, pizzettes, spritz cookies, anise cookies, biscotti, candy cane twists, Polish rum balls…. It didn’t end until Christmas Day, or until the oven gave out (she went through three). She was a five-foot-tall sugar-dealing spitfire who pushed cookies into the hands of every friend and family member within a hundred-mile radius. The only way she would cut you off is if you forgot to give her the tins back.
Read 6 Holiday Cookies You’ll Want to Bake, Swap, and Share on Repeat via Bon Appetit



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Sip on the Classic Taste of a Whiskey Daisy via The Spruce Eats

September 4th, 2019 Comments off

The whiskey daisy is a classic whiskey cocktail that has long been a favorite among whiskey lovers and cocktail enthusiasts. It is an easy recipe that uses just a few ingredients and it is a perfect cocktail for any occasion.
 
The daisy cocktail is a true classic when it comes to the thousands of cocktail recipes that we have known and loved over the years. There are many daisies and they differ from one another because of the base spirit used. In the case of the whiskey daisy, that base is obviously going to be whiskey but precisely which whiskey to use, well, that is another question.

Read Sip on the Classic Taste of a Whiskey Daisy via The Spruce Eats



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Apple Peel Bourbon Recipe via Food52

September 2nd, 2019 Comments off
Bourbon is my favorite tipple and I made some peach-infused bourbon using perfectly ripe peaches from the farmer’s market a few weeks ago, and this sounds just as tasty. — Douglas
 
This is the best, and booziest, way to use apple peels. I got the idea from Tara Duggan’s “Root to Stalk” (Ten Speed, 2013). Tara suggests serving it over ice, topped with ginger beer and a big squeeze of lime — and I agree. —Marian Bull
Read Apple Peel Bourbon Recipe via Food52



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Tequila Old Fashioned Recipe via Garden & Gun

February 13th, 2019 Comments off
Even in the cocktail-forward South, tequila sometimes gets an unfair rep as the shot of choice for college kids, or something to hide beneath a margarita mix. But a fine tequila, such as Jalisco, Mexico’s Patrón Añejo, is aged in white oak barrels for twelve to fifteen months, and is a smooth, nuanced sipper. The oak imparts a warmth and depth reminiscent of bourbon. Just in time for the Mexican holiday Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead), swap in aged tequila for bourbon in a twist on an Old Fashioned.

 

Find more Old Fashioned Recipes in this book

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This 30-Minute Chickpea Curry Is Your New Emergency Dinner via Food52

January 13th, 2019 Comments off

Even at the peak of farmers market bounty, we all need simple pantry dinners from time to time. The ones to turn to when we’ve had a long day, or just want something comforting and restoring. This creamy chickpea curry is mine.

It’s inspired by a similar dish at Cassia in Santa Monica, California, where I ate last summer with a friend. It was served simply: a bowl of the curry with triangles of flatbread blistered from a clay oven. We tore off big chunks of the warm flatbread and swiped up every last bit. I’ve been dreaming about that thick, creamy curry ever since.

[…]

Read This 30-Minute Chickpea Curry Is Your New Emergency Dinner via Food52


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Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies for our annual party via Instagram

December 19th, 2018 Comments off

Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

September 30th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

Ourhomecyclopedi00darl 0010Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

PREFACE

We take pleasure in presenting a book to the public with an arrangement of subjects entirely different from any other published, and designed especially to save much valuable time to the housewife.

The subjects are so arranged that one has only to turn through the book, and from the headlines find each chapter in alphabetical order, making it easy to turn at once to any subject or recipe desired, without even turning to the table of contents.

The object of this book is to give housekeepers the most improved and scientific cookery as developed by the most practical schools of cookery of the present day; keeping in mind economy as far as consistent with well cooked and healthful dishes. Bad cooking is not only a waste of health but of money. This book, no doubt, will save many times its cost to each purchaser. The object being to assist the housekeeper in a practical way, the authors have not catered to the epicure, hence the highly seasoned and expensive dishes have been omitted.

Cook books previously published, have been confined to recipes only, while the general information which is so essential, has been omitted. We have taken a step forward, in giving at the commencement of each chapter, general directions that will apply to the recipes following.

To illustrate, take for instance chapter seven, “Canning Fruit.” Before giving any recipes, valuable instruction is given on those essential points, as preparing the cans, the tops, the rubbers, the kind of cans to be used, heating the fruit, and a complete table giving the quantity of sugar required per quart, and the time for boiling any kind of fruit. In the chapters on poultry, game, and marketing, full information is given on selecting meats of all kinds, where the best cuts of meat are to be found, the carving etc.

In the mechanical arrangement of this volume, the publishers have made it far excell any other cook book ever published.

The type is large and clear, the leaves are broad, and the book is so bound that it will remain open at any point desired, thus saving one’s time in frequent opening, as is the case with books of narrow pages.

The initial letters are entirely new features, and were designed and copyrighted especially for this book. The artist was instructed to represent each chapter in its initial letter. How well he has done so the reader can judge when looking through the book. So valuable and so cheap a book as this one should be owned and used (not borrowed) by every housekeeper.

If this book should be the means of bringing into the household, happiness, peace and contentment; if the husband hereafter sits at the table with a smiling and satisfied countenance, and the wife feels less of care and anxiety, then its mission will have been accomx^lished.

‘^Get a husband what he likes.

And save a thousand household strikes.”


 

Excellent Mead. Three pounds brown sugar, one pint of molasses, one-fourth pound tartaric acid; mix, pour over them two quarts boiling water, stir till dissolved. When cold, add half ounce essence sassafras and bottle. When you wish to drink it, put three tablespoonfuls of it in a tumbler, fill half full with ice water, add a little more than one-fourth teaspoonful soda. An excellent summer beverage.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1889
Publisher Detroit, Mich., The Mercantile publishing co.
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

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Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane’s cooking class by E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland – 13 in a series

September 2nd, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane’s cooking class by E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland – 13 in a series

Six little cooks

Historical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane's cooking class by  E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Six little cooks, or, Aunt Jane's cooking class by  E. S. (Elizabeth Stansbury) Kirkland - 12 in a series

Want a print copy of “Six Little Cooks”? There is a reprint available on Amazon and perhaps at your local library!

FIRST DAY

“Oh, Annt Jane,” said Grace, looking up quickly from the story-book she was reading, ” I wish you would teach us all how to cook! “

But here am I, the author, plunging at once into the middle of my story without a word of explanation, not even a preface. Of course, no one can understand anything about it unless I go back a little, and tell you how it began.

Aunt Jane had come to make a visit to Mrs. Yernon, Grace’s motlier, and had brought her own little girl. Amy, to spend the vacation. Next door lived Edith Lane, a very intimate friend of both the girls, and just across the street, Rose and Jessie Carroll, Grace’s cousins; and these five, witli little Mabel Vernon, made a happy company who were almost always together. Mabel was just nine years old, and the others were from ten to twelve, so there was not difference enough in their ages to prevent their being the best of playmates.

Well — as I began to say, Grace was reading about a wonderful little girl who made such remarkable things in the way of cakes and puddings, that our . young person was seized with a desire to do likewise without delay. Aunt Jane was the kindest of aunts and the best of cooks, and Grace knew that if she would take the trouble to teach them, they would be well taught.

“I should like that of all things,” said she, in answer to Grace’s exclamation, “provided your mother consents.”

“Oh, she’d be perfectly delighted,” cried Grace; “she often says she wishes she had time to teach us herself.”

“Very well, then; run and ask her if we may begin this afternoon.”

“And can’t Rose and Jessie and Edith come too?” inquired Grace eagerly. “They all want to learn, just as much as I do.”

“Not quite so fast,” said Aunt Jane, smiling. ” Suppose we begin with those in the house first, and if it works well we can invite the others afterwards.”


 

And now there is one thing more I should like to have you do. Bring a little blank book, in which you can write down the recipes we try, and if any of them should prove not to be good, we’ll cross them off without mercy.”

The book was quickly brought, and Grace wrote down from her aunt’s dictation, as follows:

No. 1. — Susan’s Cake.

Three cups flour, two of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, one cup of sour milk, three eggs, one teaspoonful soda, two of cream tartar. Two cups seeded raisins, or one of well- washed currants, added, makes a delicious fruit cake. 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1877
Topics Cookery,cbk
Publisher Chicago : Jansen, McClurg
Collection europeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Google
Book from the collections of Harvard University
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou’s house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough, (1913) – 12 in a series

August 26th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou’s house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough, (1913) – 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Willy Lou's house book; a collection of proved recipes, hints and suggestions for practical cooking, housekeeping and housewifery by Charlotte Amelia Cheesebro Hough,  (1913) - 12 in a series

INTRODUCTION

To My Readers:

I have tried all the recipes and the suggestions given in this book. Some of them I originated, many came from friends, a few from cooks whom I have employed. It was my wish to make a practical little book for housekeepers, because when I was a young housekeeper, just beginning, I would have been glad to have such an aid in doing things that now seem easy and simple. Nor does any housekeeper ever learn it all. If my book shall prove a sort of exchange of housekeeping wisdom, I hope you will call me your friend.

WILLY LOU.


 

Baking Powder Biscuit

One quart of flour and two teaspoonfuls of
baking powder, one-half teaspoon ful of salt, one
tablespoonful of lard, one large cup of sour cream
in which one-half teaspoonful of soda has been
stirred. Mix all together thoroughly and roll
out, cut with a small cutter, bake in a quick oven
twenty to thirty minutes.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1913
Publisher Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill Co
Collection cornellamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Contributor usage rights See terms
Language English
 
 

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags: