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Learn Something New: Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter

August 30th, 2020 Comments off
Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter
 
Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter
 

The John Muir Laws blog features lots of educational resources about nature journaling and sketching in a variety of mediums, intermixed with conservation information. Also offers resources for educators.

Some of the good stuff (a sample, there’s too much to link, the whole blog archive is a treasure trove)

5 minute landscape in watercolor pencil

How to draw: birds mammals plants

Step by step: watercolor iris in colored pencilnorthern parula with watercolor

Read Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipter Cooper) in my back garden today [Video] [Photos]

August 15th, 2020 Comments off

See all the photos in this series

Coopers hawk 20200815 01

Coopers hawk 20200815 02

Coopers hawk 20200815 05

Coopers hawk 20200815 13

Coopers hawk 20200815 14

See all the photos in this series



Home School: The 500-year-old bones of African slaves tell a traumatic story via Ars Technica

May 23rd, 2020 Comments off

Archaeologists found the bones of three young African men in a 500-year-old mass grave in what is now Mexico City. The chemical makeup of their bones sheds light on their earlier lives in Africa, and forensic analysis reveals hard, painful lives and young deaths.

How the dead speak

Archaeologists unearthed the mass grave in 1992 while digging a new subway line in Mexico City. Five hundred years earlier, the site had been the grounds of the Hospital Real de San José de los Naturales. The Spanish colonizers had built the hospital to treat indigenous people—that’s what “los Naturales” means in Spanish—but these three men were African, not North or Central American. Their bones radiocarbon-dated to the 1500s CE, which makes them part of an important but often anonymous group of people: the first African people abducted in their homelands and brought across the Atlantic Ocean to European colonies in the Americas.

Read The 500-year-old bones of African slaves tell a traumatic story via Ars Technica


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: [1020] SentrySafe Opened With a Coat Hanger! via The Lock Picking Lawyer on YouTube [Video]

May 14th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: Tesla Valve Explained With Fire via NightHawkInLight on YouTube [Science]

April 27th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: Citizen Science Month: April 2020 via Citizen Science Association

April 10th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: Citizen Science Month: April 2020 via Citizen Science Association
Global Citizen Science Month (April 2020) is coordinated by SciStarter and the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University with support from the National Library of Medicine and in collaboration with the Citizen Science Association, National Geographic, and Science Friday.
Read Citizen Science Month: April 2020 via Citizen Science Association


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Monarchs by the Millions: Welcome to Butterfly Forest via Great Big Story On YouTube [Video]

March 25th, 2020 Comments off
The largest insect migration in the world ends each year in Michoacán, Mexico. Millions of monarch butterflies travel from the United States and Canada to pass the cold months in the towering trees of this beautiful forest. On their incredible journey, the butterflies travel around 2,800 miles.

How to Join the Great Backyard Bird Count via Lifehacker

February 10th, 2020 Comments off

Get ready to count some birds, because Audubon’s Great Backyard Bird Count starts this Friday, February 14, and runs through Monday the 17th. This is a beginner-friendly event, even easier to join than the Christmas bird count.

You don’t even need a backyard. Just find a place where you’re likely to see some birds. This is a great time to visit a local park or wildlife refuge. To participate, count birds for at least 15 minutes “in as many places and on as many days as you like.” You’ll keep a separate checklist for each outing. In addition to noting the types of birds you see, make sure to count (or estimate) how many individuals you saw. Two cardinals at your feeder. 20 geese on the lake.

Read How to Join the Great Backyard Bird Count via Lifehacker


An interesting link found among my daily reading

The Man Who Merged Science with Art via My Modern Met

October 7th, 2019 Comments off
The Man Who Merged Science with Art via My Modern Met
Today, many science books are full of detailed photos that reveal the intricate parts of plant life, but prior to the invention of photography (and macro photography), it was up to botanical illustrators and researchers to record the fascinating forms of flora and fauna. One scientist who recorded his findings with drawings is Ernst Heinrich Haeckel, a German biologist, naturalist, philosopher, and physician.
Read The Man Who Merged Science with Art via My Modern Met



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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Download Scale Drawings of Everything at Dimensions.Guide via Lifehacker

September 21st, 2019 Comments off
Just one of those quirky sites — and excellent resources — that I happen across in my daily reading. Just the thing if you need to compare the size of a T-Rex to a human being  and tons of other dimensions. — Douglas
The design site Dimensions.Guide is a clip art library for designers, architects, and anyone else who needs precise scale drawings. Every scale drawing in its database is composed in the same clean line-art style. Drawings include sports equipment, cars, furniture, people (in various poses and sizes), computers and phones, plants and animals, room and landscape layouts, and even Marvel characters. And it’s all free to use in your own projects.
Read Download Scale Drawings of Everything at Dimensions.Guide via Lifehacker



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading