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TV Worth Watching: Linotype: Revolutionizing Printing and Society – A Documentary

December 28th, 2017 Comments off

TV Worth Watching: Linotype: Revolutionizing Printing and Society – A Documentary

TV Worth Watching: Linotype: Revolutionizing Printing and Society - A Documentary

Watch on Kanopy

Linotype: The Film Trailer

An amazingly interesting piece of history. Linotype machines changed every part of the modern publishing world, but they were eventually supplanted by photographic and computerized typesetting methods. There is something visceral about the physical nature of these machines — turning keyboard input into hot metal type with real molten lead.

Yes, this is perhaps a bit geeky for the average viewer, but I love stories about technology and history and Linotype is certainly one of the most important pieces of technology ever to appear.

I watched Linotype using the free Kanopy service via my local library. You may be able to do that, too. Their website and apps are well produced and function well, including Chromecast and Airplay support for viewing on your TV.

Check out Kanopy here

Learn more about Linotype

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

 

TV Worth Watching: The Doctor Blake Mysteries

October 18th, 2017 Comments off

TV Worth Watching: The Doctor Blake Mysteries

Another in a long line of mystery shows I love, The Doctor Blake Mysteries comes from Australia. The show follows the life of Dr. Lucian Blake, recently returned to Australia after living — and working in intelligence in Shanghai during World War II. His life there was thrown into turmoil when he was captured by the Japanese and imprisoned, losing touch with this his Chinese wife and young daughter.

Dr. Blake is a bit unconventional for the small, Gold Rush town of Ballarat in the 1950s. He works as a police surgeon for the local force, but find himself often in conflict with his coworkers and townspeople. The stories, acting,  writing, and production are top-notch.

Season 5 of the series (its last)  is currently airing in Australia, but Seasons 1-3 are available via Netflix and 1-4  available for sale on Amazon. The Dr. Blake Mysteries also airs on many public television stations in the US.

Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories is the next great show from Netflix Japan via The Verge

April 19th, 2017 Comments off
I enjoyed Midnight Diner immensely and I recommend it to anyone I know who subscribes to Netflix. It’s in Japanese, with English subtitles, so you can’t just have it on in the background, but each 30 minute episode is worth the time focusing on it and immersing yourself in this tiny little Japanese world. I am eagerly awaiting the next season. Check it out! — Douglas
 
Terrace House has become Netflix Japan’s breakout international hit — and with good reason — but for my money it runs second place to another of the streaming service’s Japanese shows. Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories follows the owner and clientele of a tiny Tokyo restaurant, telling short, touching stories of family, friendship, and humanity in the heart of urban sprawl.

 
PS…Another great Japanese show I enjoyed on Netflix was Atelier.

An interesting link found among my daily reading

On YouTube: Gardeners’ World 2017 – Episode 1 (HD)

March 12th, 2017 Comments off

I make time to watch Gardeners’ Word from the BBC any time I get the chance. They just started their 50th Season this week. One great segment they’ve added for this season is an interview with a major influence in gardening each episode. Garderners’ World is my brief respite from the “real world” each week. — Douglas

On YouTube: Gardeners' World 2017 - Episode 1 (HD)

Watch YouTube: Gardeners’ World 2017 – Episode 1 (HD)

I liked this video and think you might find it interesting, too!

On YouTube: Madame Tussaud: A Legend in Wax BBC Documentary 2017

February 28th, 2017 Comments off

Noted: New Chrome extension helps find all those hidden Netflix categories

February 6th, 2017 Comments off

On YouTube: British History’s Biggest Fibs with Lucy Worsley Episode 1 War of the Roses [HD]

January 30th, 2017 Comments off

Noted: Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries visual novel out this year

January 12th, 2017 Comments off

I’ve been a big fan of the Miss Fisher’s Mysteries series out of Australia and watched and re-watched all three seasons. (You can see them all on Netflix). I love mysteries a lot — from Poirot to Maigret to Midsomer to Foyle — and Miss Fisher ticks all of my mystery lover boxes. I think it could be very interesting to see a game with the characters. Series 4 of the Miss Fisher’s Mysteries might not happen — although there has been some talk of a reduced series of longer movies to carry on the story. I certainly hope it returns — Douglas

Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch | Douglas E. Welch Gift Guide #32

December 2nd, 2016 Comments off

Dew 2016 gift guide

From 1966-1968 NBC aired The Monkees on Mondays at 7:30pm, opposite Gilligan’s Island on CBS and Iron Horse on ABC.  During that time Raybert Productions, headed by Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson, produced 58 half-hours of what Time Magazine contributor James Poniewozik recently described as “far better TV than it had to be.

During an era of formulaic domestic sitcoms and wacky comedies, it was a stylistically ambitious show, with a distinctive visual style, absurdist sense of humor, and unusual story structure that was commercial, wholesome, and yet impressively weird.”

Originally, the producers conceived The Monkees as a response to the youth and music movement of the early 60s, a time when every young person seemed to be slinging a guitar on their back and hoping to change the world.  In the shadow of Hard Day’s Night the producers cast four relative unknowns who could act, sing and play instruments – Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork and Mike Nesmith – and hired Jim Frawley to teach them improvisation and become their in-house director. Beyond mere fame, The Monkees deserves ranking as a TV Cultural and Comedy Classic because, according to Micky Dolenz, “It brought long hair into the living room and changed the way teenagers were portrayed on television.  It made it okay to have long hair in the same way Henry Winkler as the Fonz late made it okay to wear a black leather jacket and Will Smith in Fresh Prince of Bel Air made it okay to be to be young, black and like rap.”

From an artistic standpoint the show introduced a new generation of viewers to the kind of fourth-wall-breaking, slapstick comedy created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers as well as to the idea of friends in their late teens living on their own without adult advice or supervision, a powerful idea at the height of the Vietnam war.

While there is continued controversy over the fact that the musical group has yet to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, time has shown that the television show deserves the accolades it earned.  Now it deserves a deeper reading and that is exactly what Why The Monkees Matter will provide.

Go beyond the fandom and delve deeply into what The Monkees meant to “the young generation” and to our current world.

 

Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch | Douglas E. Welch Gift Guide #32

Order a signed copy directly from the author

Also Available from McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs

Previously in the Douglas E. Welch 2016 Gift Guide…

Mohu Leaf 30 TV Antenna | Douglas E. Welch Gift Guide 2016 #10

November 10th, 2016 Comments off

Dew 2016 gift guide

From Douglas…

About 2 years ago, we finally decided to turn off our cable television account, return our cable boxes and rely on over-the-air broadcasts again. While the thought of living with “rabbit ears” didn’t really thrill me, we were only watching about 5 shows from broadcast TV. Joseph had long outgrown NickJr and Nickelodeon — his major viewing. We didn’t subscribe to any pay channels and looking over the all the channels we COULD watch, we only really would ever watch about 10 of them. So, once the cable bill topped over $100 it was time to turn it off.

First, we needed a decent antenna to receive the HD over-the-air (OTA) digital broadcasts. Too many people think that when we turned off the analog broadcasting system a few years ago it turned off ALL over-the-air broadcasts. In fact, there is more content to be found, for free, over-the-air than ever before. Looking about in the Internet, I came across the Mohu Leaf indoors HDTV antenna. it took a little fiddling with positioning in our large home office/family room, but now we can watch any broadcast television show we might wish, including Castle, NCIS, Big Bang Theory and Once Upon A Time — which are basically all we watch. This also pulls in news during fires, earthquakes and other emergencies. This antenna is connected to a 42″ LCD HDTV that we upgraded to a year or so ago and provides full 1080p signal for most stations and shows.

Mohu Leaf 30 TV Antenna

Mohu Leaf 30 TV Antenna

More Over-The-Air Antenna at Amazon.com

 * A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Previously in the Douglas E. Welch 2016 Gift Guide…

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