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Time-less via Instagram

August 4th, 2020 No comments

Time-less

Time-less via Instagram

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Liquidambar Leaves In Autumn Watercolor Duffle Bags Exclusively From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [Buy Now]

August 4th, 2020 No comments

A Bird Sentinel Watches Over The Chaparral On These Products Exclusively From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

August 3rd, 2020 No comments

Spotted Leaf 2 via Instagram

August 2nd, 2020 No comments

Spotted Leaf 2 via Instagram

Spotted Leaf 2 via Instagram

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Spotted Leaf 1 via Instagram

August 2nd, 2020 No comments

Spotted Leaf 1 via Instagram

Spotted Leaf 1 via Instagram

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From my Instagram Feed



Home School: How ‘Wild’ was the Wild West via History Matters on YouTube

August 2nd, 2020 No comments
We’ve all heard the stories of the Wild West. Saloon Brawls, duels at high noon, ladies being tied to Train Tracks by moustachioed gentlemen, Cowboys fighting Indians. But how true is any of this? To put it bluntly. Just how ‘Wild’ was the Wild West. Find out in this short animated simple history documentary.
Watch How ‘Wild’ was the Wild West via History Matters on YouTube


An interesting link found among my daily reading

LEGO Millenium Falcon via Instagram

August 2nd, 2020 No comments

LEGO Millenium Falcon via Instagram

LEGO Millenium Falcon via Instagram

LEGO Millenium Falcon via Instagram

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Historical Cooking Books – 62 in a series – Woman’s City Club Cook Book (1923)

August 2nd, 2020 No comments

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 62 in a series – Woman’s City Club Cook Book (1923)

Historical Cooking Books - 62 in a series - Woman's City Club Cook Book (1923)

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

See More:

Publication date 1923
Topics Cookery, AmericanCookery — Illinois Chicagocbk
Publisher Chicago, Ill. : [s.n.]
Collection university_of_illinois_urbana-champaignamericana
Digitizing sponsor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Contributor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Kingston LED Mechanical Keyboard via Instagram and TikTok

July 31st, 2020 No comments

Kingston LED Mechanical Keyboard

Kingston LED Mechanical Keyboard via Instagram and TikTok

I have come to love this keyboard, especially the integrated key backlighting. Makes it so much easier to type in dimmer lighting.

@douglaswelch

Kingston LED Mechanical Keyboard ##technology ##keyboard ##led ##computer ##kingston

♬ Backyard Boy – Claire Rosinkranz

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The US Department of Justice was originally created to tackle white supremacy via Boing Boing

July 31st, 2020 No comments

Americanism has a weird obsession with vague notions of “law and order.” At its core, there’s nothing unique about a society whose existence depends on a collective respect for its own internal rule system — indeed, that’s basically just a society. But those who buy the narrative of Good Ol’ American Jingoism love to toss around their platitudes about being a “nation of laws,” without giving much thought to what that actually means, or who is served by that law and order. Whatever the status quo they got used to, that’s the way things have always been, and thus, it is right.

Consider the US Department of Justice. I’ve never even given much thought to its founding; I hadn’t thought much about the origins of police departments growing out of slave patrols until it was explicitly brought to my attention either.

But Smithsonian Magazine has a great new piece about the origins of the DoJ, which began on July 1, 1870 — exactly 150 years ago this month. And it turns out, it’s a direct extension of Reconstruction-era struggles, and was created specifically to enforce racial equality by fighting voter suppression and the KKK: