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Start A New Beekeeping/Garden Journal these “Bees Take A Drink” Hardcover Journals and Much More!

August 13th, 2018 No comments

Historical Cooking Books: The college woman’s cook book by College Woman’s Cook Book Association (Evanston, Ill.) (1923) – 10 in a series

August 12th, 2018 No comments

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: The college woman’s cook book by College Woman’s Cook Book Association (Evanston, Ill.) (1923) – 10 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: The college woman's cook book by College Woman's Cook Book Association (Evanston, Ill.) (1923) - 10 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: The college woman's cook book by College Woman's Cook Book Association (Evanston, Ill.) (1923) - 10 in a series

The compiling and publishing f this book of recipes has been the work of a group of college women, living in and near Evanston, 111., most of whom are graduates of Northwestern University.

A portion of the profit accruing from the publishing of this cook-book is to be given each year for the support of a summer camp in Michigan, where unfortunate kiddies from the cities are given a real vacation.

Over 2,500 college women, most of them housewives, were asked for their best tested recipes. From those submitted, 500 of the best and most unusual have been selected and published in this handy volume. By following the names under each recipe, it will be observed that leading colleges in all parts of the United States and Canada are represented.


 CREAM SCONES

2 cups flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
3 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt

Sift three times. Rub in four rounding tablespoons butter with tips of fingers. Add two eggs beaten (reserving small amount of unbeaten white) with one-third cup sweet milk. Toss, on floured board and pat to one-half inch thickness. Brush over with egg white; sprinkle with sugar; cut and bake fifteen minutes in quick overi.

Helen Binnie, Kenosha, Wis. University of Wisconsin.


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date c1923
Publisher Evanston, Il. : College Woman’s Cook Book Assoc.
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History Tags:

Reading – Reveille in Washington: 1860-1865 by Margaret Leech – 20 in a series

August 7th, 2018 No comments

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – Reveille in Washington: 1860-1865 by Margaret Leech – 20 in a series

Reading - Reveille in Washington: 1860-1865 by Margaret Leech - 20 in a series

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

History is fascinating, but the smaller, more intimate stories of historical events can often get lost among the “big picture” history of other books. Reveille in Washington is a book that focuses one small, yet infinitely important, town during the American Civil War, Washington, D.C. We are led through the streets of Washington as war begins, cannons are heard on the horizon and a seemingly endless flow of men arrive, are mustered into the U.S. Army, sent off to battle and, for many, return horribly wounded to try and survive in hospitals surrounding the capital.

We learn of secessionists who pack up and leave for the South as the battles begin. Some cheer Confederate victories, run supplies and information through the Union blockades and, in some cases, find themselves locked in military prisons with no hope of release.

We learn of the mud, the stink, the heat, the humidity, the disease-carrying mosquitos that haunted the swampy city each summer. We follow politicians as they come and go, battle on the Congress floor and fight among themselves in Lincoln’s Cabinet Room.

Reveille in Washington reveals the day-to-day reality of Washington during the Civil War and allows us to reflect on a new angle of that conflict.

From Amazon.com…

1860: The American capital is sprawling, fractured, squalid, colored by patriotism and treason, and deeply divided along the political lines that will soon embroil the nation in bloody conflict. Chaotic and corrupt, the young city is populated by bellicose congressmen, Confederate conspirators, and enterprising prostitutes. Soldiers of a volunteer army swing from the dome of the Capitol, assassins stalk the avenues, and Abraham Lincoln struggles to justify his presidency as the Union heads to war. 

Reveille in Washington focuses on the everyday politics and preoccupations of Washington during the Civil War. From the stench of corpse-littered streets to the plunging lace on Mary Lincoln’s evening gowns, Margaret Leech illuminates the city and its familiar figures—among them Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, William Seward, and Mary Surratt—in intimate and fascinating detail. 

Leech’s book remains widely recognized as both an impressive feat of scholarship and an uncommonly engrossing work of history.

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Categories: Books, History Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Woman’s City Club cook book by Woman’s City Club of Chicago (Ill.). Library Committee – 9 in a series

August 5th, 2018 No comments

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Woman’s City Club cook book by Woman’s City Club of Chicago (Ill.). Library Committee – 9 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Woman's City Club cook book by Woman's City Club of Chicago (Ill.). Library Committee - 9 in a series Historical Cooking Books: Woman's City Club cook book by Woman's City Club of Chicago (Ill.). Library Committee - 9 in a series

A PERFECT CHICAGO

1 good Mayor, 31 incorruptible Judges,

50 upright Aldermen, 1 intelligent School Board, (be

1 efficient Chief of Police, sure this mixes smoothly),

An unlimited number of active Civic Organizations.

Moisten these ingredients thoroughly with the milk of
Human Kindness; flavor well with Honesty, Wisdom and
Steadfastness; stirring in at the same time a large measure
of Civic Spirit. Pour into the mold of the City Beautiful, and
let stand until firmly set, testing, from time to time, with the
straw of Public Opinion.

If followed carefully this recipe cannot fail.


 

COUNTY COMMITTEE CAKE
Mrs. Wm. Harrison Cade

1 cup sugar % cup milk

% cup butter 2 cups flour

3 eggs 2 tsp. baking powder

LEMON FILLING

1 egg V2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar 2 tbsp. flour

Juice of a lemon Butter size of a walnut

Melt butter, stir in flour. Add water and sugar. Boil gently
five minutes. Pour on beaten egg and add lemon juice.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1923
Publisher Chicago, Ill. : [s.n.]
Language English
 

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: The American pastry cook by Jessup Whitehead (1894) – 8 in a series

July 29th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: The American pastry cook by Jessup Whitehead (1894) – 8 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: The American pastry cook (1894) - 8 in a series Historical Cooking Books: The American pastry cook (1894) - 8 in a series

The American pastry cook : a book of perfected receipts for making all sorts of articles required of the hotel pastry cook, baker, and confectioner, especially adapted for hotel and steamboat use, and for cafés and fine bakeries

Introductory in the National Hotel Reporter.

For any apparent presumptuousness there may be in spreading these cooking receipts and instructions before the professed cooks of the country in the most widely circulated and most influential hotel journal, I have to offer as apology that 1 was long ago impressed with the singular fact, that among all the excellent cooks, hardly any could be found who worked by any rule or measure. This was especially the case with American cooks. They knew how themselves, but could not have given exact instructions even to their sons without first instituting a series of experiments, and their knowledge perished with them. I simply set to work to reduce my portion of the general knowledge to exact figures, and the merit claimed, therefore, is not for very extraordinary skill, but rather for the painstaking industry that has never allowed a receipt to be put away marked O. K., without being satisfied that it was quite reliable.

Another consideration offered is, that the stewards, and others, who buy for cooks to use, not being, in the great majority of cases, practical cooks themselves, are apt to consider many of the demands of the cooks for certain kinds of materials necessary to good work, as but unreasonable whims, not worthy of notice, and it is difficult to see how the requisite explanations are ever to be made, unless through some such means and medium as the present,

J. W. Daily National Hotel Reporter, Oct., 1878.


15. Hickory Nut Cake.

8 ounces of sugar.
S ounces of butter.
8 ounces of whites of eggs (9 whites.)
1/2 cupful of milk.
1 rounded teaspoonful of baking powder.
1 pound of flour.

12 ounces of hickory nut kernels.

Don’t beat the whites to a froth. Warm the butter and sugar together and rub them to a cream the usual way, then add the eggs, then milk, powder, and the flour.

When well mixed stir in the hickory nuts. Flavorings may be added at option. If brandy be used the baking powder should be left out.


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1894
Publisher Chicago : J. Whitehead & Co.
Digitizing sponsor Boston Public Library
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Cre-Fydd’s family fare : the young housewife’s daily assistant, on all matters relating to cookery and housekeeping (1864) – 7 in a series

July 22nd, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Cre-Fydd’s family fare : the young housewife’s daily assistant, on all matters relating to cookery and housekeeping (1864) – 7 in a series

B21527994 0005B21527994 0007

PREFACE.

If you know better precepts than these, candidly tell me ; if not, follow them as I do. Horace.

Amid the numerous books, to which the names of well-known professors of the culinary art are attached, it may appear in some degree presumptuous in one unknown, to present to the Public her ‘Cre-fydd’s Family Fare.’

The Authoress would not have been thus daring had she not ascertained by her own experience, as well as that of many friends, that whatever the other merits of previous works on the subjects of cookery and household management, they are not practically available for the moderate and economical, yet reasonably luxurious, housekeeper, or for those who are young or who are inexperienced in those matters. In those works there is no lack of receipts, maxims, and 4 directions to the cook ; ’ but in general, when tested by a moderate cook, or directed by an inexperienced person, failure and disappointment are the result.

Let any young housewife in moderate circumstances (and we cannot all afford to invoke the shade of Ude, or have Francatelli at our elbow) answer whether, when she has put the newly-purchased cookery-book into the hands of her cook, she has not been ultimately disappointed. Not from excessive fastidiousness on her part, or from the want of goodwill in the cook, but because, in the majority of instances, the receipts and directions are only suited to those cooks who are well informed, and have had considerable practice (see note, p. xi.). They are often the result of theo- retical ingenuity, or the productions of those who know, but who cannot impart their knowledge to the uninformed. Theory and practice must be combined ; and that com- bination put forth in such language, that while the lady will not object to read, the cook will be able to understand.

The Authoress of the present work has, from various motives, sought opportunities, and from peculiar circum- stances found them, of acquiring the receipts it contains. They are not all new to the Public, though many of them are, but they have all this recommendation — that they have been tested, and served on the table of the Authoress, under her direct supervision. Those dishes have past the ordeal of fastidious and almost morbidly critical palates, and have come forth with ap- proval. The materials suggested are reasonably econo- mical, the quantities exact, and the directions plain. The words 4 reasonably economical ’ are used advisedly, as it would be insulting to the understanding of sensible persons to state that inferior materials can be formed into superior dishes. In addition to the receipts on cookery, the Authoress has introduced a variety of other receipts and suggestions for the management of a house and ser- vants. With regard to servants, it may be observed that many of them would be much better for the gentle but firm directions of a kind mistress Experienced and skilful servants need no direction ; but such are not always to be found ; and when found, the rate of wages required by them would not be suitable to persons with a moderate income. A mistress, under such circumstances, if she would have a comfortable establishment, must be able, in some degree,’ to instruct her servants ; without this, it is impossible that they, who have but little experience, can know the wants incident to a respectable family.

The necessity of doing what she advises, has been forced on the Authoress during a long life of much experience.

In order to moderate, in some degree, the difficulty of managing a household, these suggestions are made. If the Authoress has aided the young housewife, and smoothed the way in the difficulties of housekeeping, and in that essential to health and comfort, good cooking, her object has been attained.

It will be observed that the quantity of every ingredient used is carefully given, as well as the exact time required in cooking. Each receipt is perfect in itself, for it is found that reference to other receipts is, to the inexperienced, extremely perplexing. French terms are avoided.

It is right to add that the whole of the receipts have been successfully used, with the simple aid of an ordinary range, and the usual appliances found in the kitchen of a small establishment.

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1864
Publisher London : Simpkin, Marshall
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English
 

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: The Chicago Herald cooking school : a professional cook’s book for household use,… by Jessup Whitehead (1883)- 6 in a series

July 15th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: The Chicago Herald cooking school : a professional cook’s book for household use,… by Jessup Whitehead (1883)- 6 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: The Chicago Herald cooking school : a professional cook's book for household use,... by Jessup Whitehead (1883)- 6 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: The Chicago Herald cooking school : a professional cook's book for household use,... by Jessup Whitehead (1883)- 6 in a series

All the books of this description that have oeen worthy of consideration seem to have had a leading motive for their composition, either to introduce foreign modes, to teach new schools of cookery or new extremes of ornamentation, to teach manners, or to put in practice the theories of great chemists and new idea doctors — Leibig, Graham, the vegetarians, and others. If a motive can be found for the work in hand, it is to make good cooks; such as are always in demand at good wages. It was commenced in a persistent endeavor of the writer, to break in untrained assistants to do cooking as it should be done, and the utmost plainness of language and exactness of quantities that were necessary in such cases have been preserved as the main requisites to the usefulness of the book. Already, before the appearance of the Cooking School in book form, a sort of wondering surprise had been expressed that fine cooking could be such a plain and easy matter, as if there was an expectation that the mysterious part would begin after awhile; but doubtless the day is past for the most necessary art of cookery to be hidden and made unintelligible by the use of unknown words and phrases. At least, when the writer wanted assistants to do something in a certain way, he used the kind of language to make them understand. Perhaps that is why this is called a cooking school.

In regard to the reliability of the recipes, it would be expressing but little to say they have all been tried, for they have been matters of daily practice for years, and most of them have been changed and improved until it is believed the highest pitch of excellence has been reached and may always be by those who carefully follow the directions. There is much more in the book than at first may appear, for nothing is repeated and almost every dish — every meat dish and soup at any rate is a model for a number of other articles to be prepared in the same way, for example : there is one real fricassee thickened with eggs, that of frogs; one stew with wine, that of terrapin; one bird pie with brown gravy, one with common stew gravy; one example of a blanquette or white dish, the supreme of fowl, and so it will be found all through. There has been a special avoidance of the terrible “or” of most cook books, which invariably leads off to different persons’ ways of doing the same thing and to the inquirer who does know something when she has read the first recipe, ending by knowing nothing after perusing them all. Where there are more ways than one, one of them must be the best, and the author of a cook book should be able to say which it is.

As to the menus, the writer has never during an extended experi ence found it practicable or desirable to follow a pattern bill-of-fare in every particular, there are too many reasons for changing the intentions ; either there is something in the house that must be used, or the dealer who supplies the house has not the particular article on hand or something else is in the way, so that, at best, a pattern menu can only serve as a suggestion of dishes to choose from. As nothing is repeated in the lists of available dishes here presented, the number of changes and substitutions that can be made will be found very considerable.

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1883
Publisher Chicago : The author
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English
 

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Original recipes of good things to eat by Order of the Eastern Star. Logan Square Chapter No. 560 (Chicago, Ill.) (1919) – 5 in a series

July 8th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


The section on the hiring and treatment of servants is very interesting and applies to all employees today! — Douglas

Historical Cooking Books: Original recipes of good things to eat by Order of the Eastern Star. Logan Square Chapter No. 560 (Chicago, Ill.) (1919)

Historical Cooking Books: Original recipes of good things to eat by Order of the Eastern Star. Logan Square Chapter No. 560 (Chicago, Ill.) (1919) - 5 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Original recipes of good things to eat by Order of the Eastern Star. Logan Square Chapter No. 560 (Chicago, Ill.) (1919) - 5 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Original recipes of good things to eat by Order of the Eastern Star. Logan Square Chapter No. 560 (Chicago, Ill.) (1919) - 5 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Original recipes of good things to eat by Order of the Eastern Star. Logan Square Chapter No. 560 (Chicago, Ill.) (1919) - 5 in a series

Good friends, Im placed here in your view
To introduce myself to you.
Between my covers you will find.
Choice Recipes of every kind.
You need not be a third-rate cook,
For all you have to do is look.
I’ll teach you how to mix and bake
The things that mother used to make
Good things to drink and things to eat
And hard and soft and sour and sweet.
All credit goes, I must confess,
To LOGAN SQUARE CHAPTER, O. E. S.
They put me here to tell you why
This splendid COOK-BOOK you should buy.

Compiled by members of
LOGAN SQUARE CHAPTER, No. 560
Order of the Eastern Star

To Our Friends:

“But for life, the universe were nothing; and all that has life re-quires nourishment”

Cookery is the art of preparing food for the nourishment of the body. In preparing this book we wish that it may not only be looked upon as a compilation of tried and tested recipes, but that it may awaken a deeper in- terest in our friends and a broader study of what to eat.

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1919
Publisher [Chicago] : Logan Square Chapter No. 560, Order of the Eastern Star
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History Tags:

Reading – In The Restaurant: Society in Four Courses by Christoph Ribbat (Translated by Jamie Searl Romanelli) – 20 in a series

July 4th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – In The Restaurant: Society in Four Courses by Christoph Ribbat (Translated by Jamie Searl Romanelli) – 20 in a series

I love books that focus on very specific areas of history — like building the Duomo in Florence, the painting of the Sistine Chapel, the California Gold Rush — because it is through the focus on the “small” history that I believe we better illuminate the “big” picture of the past. “In The Restaurant” provides just such historical illumination by showing the reader a history of the restaurant from its humblest beginnings to its most outrageous (and expensive) modern examples. Through this history lies a huge story of the catered and those that cater to them, the workers and those who employ them, the stark differences between the carefully orchestrated scene in the dining room and the humble, hot and harried scene behind the kitchen door. Two separated by a small piece of wooden door but infinitely different in character, style, and substance. By learning more about restaurants we earn about history itself an might just see our next restaurant visit in a different — and more illuminating light.

From Amazon.com…

What does eating out tell us about who we are? The restaurant is where we go to celebrate, to experience pleasure, to see and be seen – or, sometimes, just because we’re hungry. But these temples of gastronomy hide countless stories.

As this dazzlingly entertaining, eye-opening book shows, the restaurant is where performance, fashion, commerce, ritual, class, work and desire all come together. Through its windows, we can glimpse the world.

This is the tale of the restaurant in all its guises, from the first formal establishments in eighteenth-century Paris serving ‘restorative’ bouillon, to today’s new Nordic cuisine, via grand Viennese cafés and humble fast food joints. Here are tales of cooks who spend hours arranging rose petals for Michelin stars, of the university that teaches the consistency of the perfect shake, of the lunch counter that sparked a protest movement, of the writers – from Proust to George Orwell – who have been inspired or outraged by the restaurant’s secrets.

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

Categories: Books, Food, History Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: The Home cook book : compiled from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns by Home for the Friendless (Chicago, Ill.) (1877)

July 1st, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


The section on the hiring and treatment of servants is very interesting and applies to all employees today! — Douglas

Historical Cooking Books: The Home cook book : compiled from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns by Home for the Friendless (Chicago, Ill.) (1877)

Historical Cooking Books: The Home cook book : compiled from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns by Home for the Friendless (Chicago, Ill.) (1877)Historical Cooking Books: The Home cook book : compiled from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns by Home for the Friendless (Chicago, Ill.) (1877)

Historical Cooking Books: The Home cook book : compiled from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns by Home for the Friendless (Chicago, Ill.) (1877)

PREFACE

In issuing this new edition of the Home Cook Book, the Publisher takes renewed pleasure in acknowledging the kind favor with which the work has been received by the intelligent housekeepers of the country, by whose appreciative judgment alone it could have attained to such extraordinary success. In. accordance with the promise made at the outset, improvements have been made from time to time, each adding to the value of the work, and increasing its just popularity. Pursuant to the same policy, the present edition is still further improved by the addition of articles on Servants, Marketing and the Kitchen, which have been prepared expressly for this work, by one of the most prominent and experienced of American housekeepers, whose name would be sufficient guaranty for the value of her suggestions. It will be seen, that in its chief and distinctive character as a collection of choice and valuable recipes, tried and approved by housekeepers of first intelligence and most ample experience, the work is unchanged.

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1877
Topics Cookery, American, Cookery — Illinois Chicago, cbk
Publisher Chicago : J. Fred Waggoner
Collection university_of_illinois_urbana-champaign; americana
Digitizing sponsor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Contributor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home Tags:
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