Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format
Close

Archive

Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

Historical Cooking Books: The Ohio farmer’s home guide book by Eva A. Season (1888) – 19 in a series

December 10th, 2018 No comments

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: The Ohio farmer’s home guide book by Eva A. Season (1888): : a complete manual of practical instruction in every department of household economy : including the kitchen, the laundry, the dining-room, the parlor, the sleeping rooms, fancy work, home decoration, parental duty, etc., etc. – 19 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!’

Historical Cooking Books: The Ohio farmer's home guide book by Eva A. Season (1888) - 19 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: The Ohio farmer's home guide book by Eva A. Season (1888) - 19 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: The Ohio farmer's home guide book by Eva A. Season (1888) - 19 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: The Ohio farmer's home guide book by Eva A. Season (1888) - 19 in a series

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


Home:

This word has a comparatively narrow signification in this country; generally it is used to denote a “dwelling place.” The English attach a far deeper meaning to it. To them it means “the place where the heart is/’ the one place on earth where, above all others, the affections are centered — father, mother, brother, sister, are all concentra- ted in that one word. To make our dwelling place a home it must be made attractive; it need not be fashionable; it must be neat. Do not shut out the sunshine; it may fade the carpet, but it will preserve the health of the inmates, and give an air of cheerfulness all through the house. Do not be afraid of a little fun. If you want to ruin your sons, let them think that all mirth and social enjoyment must be left on the threshold when they come home at night 1 When once a home is regarded as only a place in which to eat, drink and sleep, the work is begun that ends in gambling- houses and reckless degradation. Young people must have fun and relaxation somewhere; if they do not find it at their own hearth-stones, it will be sought at other and perhaps less profitable places. Therefore let the fire burn brightly at night, and make the homestead delightful with all those little arts that parents so perfectly understand. Do not re- press the buoyant spirit of your children. Half an hour of merriment around the lamp, in the firelight of a home, blots out the remembrance of many a care and annoyance of the day; and the best safeguard children can take with them into the world is the blessed influence of a bright little domestic sanctum.


Publication date 1888
Publisher Cleveland, Ohio : The Ohio farmer
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: – Cupid’s book of good counsel by (E. F.) Kiessling & Son – 18 in a series

December 4th, 2018 No comments

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Cupid’s book of good counsel by (E. F.) Kiessling & Son – 18 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: - Cupid's book of good counsel by (E. F.) Kiessling  & Son - 18 in a seriesCupidsbookofgood00kiesrich 0011

Historical Cooking Books: - Cupid's book of good counsel by (E. F.) Kiessling  & Son - 18 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Cupid's book of good counsel by (E. F.) Kiessling  & Son - 18 in a series

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


THIS BOOK is presented free to the Bride And Groom with the compliments of the ADVERTISERS therein, who make such presentation possible. We recommend them as the best in their respective lines and they will accord you the fairest kind of treatment. Your patronage will be highly appreciated by them. Please mention Cupid’s Book.

Compiled and Published by

E. F. Kiessling & Son

Box 557 Oakland :•: California


Publication date 1918?
Publisher Oakland, Calif.
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: – Housekeeper’s companion by Bessie E. Gunter (1889) – 17 in a series

November 25th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Housekeeper’s companion by Bessie E. Gunter (1889) – 17 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: - Housekeeper's companion by Bessie E. Gunter (1901) - 17 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Housekeeper's companion by Bessie E. Gunter (1901) - 17 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Housekeeper's companion by Bessie E. Gunter (1901) - 17 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Housekeeper's companion by Bessie E. Gunter (1901) - 17 in a series

PREFACE

It is not claimed that the receipts collected in this book are original with the contributors, but that they have been tried and are recommended by them. The compiler of these receipts has sufficient confidence in the experience and reputation of the contributors, al- most all of whom are personally known to her, to justify the hope that they will stand the test of the most critical. Many of these receipts have been used in their families for several generations, others we think will show that the contributors have kept pace with the times and selected the best of those of more recent introduction.

The prime object of the compiler of these receipts is to raise money for a charitable object, but she also hopes to bring within the reach of others many valua- ble receipts.

BESSIE E. GUNTER.

Accomack, C. H., Virginia, August, 1889.

 

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


COFFEE.

Take two pounds of good Java Coffee. Put it in a pan with a piece of lard the size of a hickory nut, to make it brown nicely. Roast slowly, stirring con- stantly, to keep from burning, until it is of a light brown color. To three pints of boiling water put five good tablespoonful or a good gill of ground coffee. Boil at least ten minutes, then take off and settle with a little cold water. Let it stand a short time before taking it to the table, so that it may settle well.

— MRS. M. A. A.


Publication date 1883
Publisher San Francisco : A.L. Bancroft
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor msn
Language English
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

The New York Public Library is Turning Classics Into Instagram Stories via Gizmodo

November 22nd, 2018 Comments off

Mashing up media is one great way to create something new in the world and I am all for it. These Instagram versions of literary classics is just one way to mix things up and use new technology to deliver — still relevant — text in an interesting fashion. — Douglas

Gizmodo has advocated for libraries as an excellent means of logging off, because a library is a service that lets you “stream” films, music, magazines, books, and all other kinds of media for free.

But now one of the world’s greatest libraries is trying to enrich the social media experience. The New York Public Library just released the first of its InstaNovel series on Instagram Stories. NYPL followers can watch-read the first part ofAlice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll on the app. The feature shows the full text of the book, but also includes illustrations by designer Magoz, and animated pages that capture the liveliness of Carroll’s creative page formatting. As anyone who’s used Facebook’s Snapchat clone could assume, lifting a finger from the screen turns the page.

Historical Cooking Books: – The American pictorial home book; or, Housekeeper’s encyclopedia by Harriet Almaria Baker (1883) – 16 in a series

November 18th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – The American pictorial home book; or, Housekeeper’s encyclopedia by Harriet Almaria Baker (1883) – 16 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: - The American pictorial home book; or, Housekeeper's encyclopedia by Harriet Almaria Baker (1883) - 16 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - The American pictorial home book; or, Housekeeper's encyclopedia by Harriet Almaria Baker (1883) - 16 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - The American pictorial home book; or, Housekeeper's encyclopedia by Harriet Almaria Baker (1883) - 16 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - The American pictorial home book; or, Housekeeper's encyclopedia by Harriet Almaria Baker (1883) - 16 in a series

THE AMERICAN PICTORIAL HOME BOOK,

OR

HOUSEKEEPER’S ENCYCLOPEDIA,

Is the result of many years of earnest effort and practical study. It is a work that may be studied with pleasure and profit during the hours of ease and leisure, and in cases of emergency it can be referred to as a judicious friend and adviser in a remedial point of view.

It is unsurpassed as a valuable Reference Book for young housekeepers, and a prompt and ready guide in all household matters ; in caring for the Sick and directing Servants ; in the Nursery, Laundry, Dairy, Poultry and Farm Yards, the Garden, Etiquette, etc. Its recipes and suggestions are applicable to all climates and all conditions of life.


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1883
Publisher San Francisco : A.L. Bancroft
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor msn
Language English
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, In the kitchen Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: – Candlelight tea; a book of recipes by Lina Dunlap (1910) – 15 in a series

November 5th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Candlelight tea; a book of recipes by Lina Dunlap (1910) – 15 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: - Candlelight tea; a book of recipes by Lina Dunlap (1910) - 15 in a series Historical Cooking Books: - Candlelight tea; a book of recipes by Lina Dunlap (1910) - 15 in a series

GRAPE WINE

Take the white grape when fully ripe, pick from the stems, pound to a pulp, put them into large stone jar, pour over them half as much water as there are grapes, cover with cheese cloth and let stand until next day, then squeeze out and strain the juice. Mix three pounds of granulated sugar and the whites of two eggs to each gallon of juice, boil a few minutes and skim. When cold, put into a keg until through fermenting. Bottle it, seal the corks, keep in cool place, or bury in sawdust.

 

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1910
Publisher Lexington, Ky., Press of Transylvania Printing Company
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, In the kitchen Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: – Things mother used to make, a collection of old time recipes, some nearly one hundred years old and never published before by Lydia Maria Gurney (1914) – 14 in a series

October 28th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Things mother used to make, a collection of old time recipes, some nearly one hundred years old and never published before by Lydia Maria Gurney – 14 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: - Things mother used to make, a collection of old time recipes, some nearly one hundred years old and never published before by Lydia Maria Gurney (1914) - 14 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Things mother used to make, a collection of old time recipes, some nearly one hundred years old and never published before by Lydia Maria Gurney (1914) - 14 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Things mother used to make, a collection of old time recipes, some nearly one hundred years old and never published before by Lydia Maria Gurney (1914) - 14 in a seriesThingsmotherused00gurnrich 0011

INTRODUCTION

The Things Mother Used To Make consist of old fashioned recipes, which have been for the most part handed down by word of mouth from one generation to another, extending over a period of nearly one hundred years. The author, a New England woman, has during her life tested out in her own kitchen the greater part of these recipes, which represent the best cookery of those times.

This material was originally published in Suburban Life, where it obtained such recognition as seemed to warrant its preservation in book form. The original material has accordingly been amplified, and it is here presented as one of the volumes in the series of Countryside Manuals.

FRANK A. ARNOLD NEW YORK September 15, 1913

AUTHOR’S FOREWORD

Good food depends as largely upon the judgment of the cook, as upon the materials used. These recipes and Household Hints are written very plainly, for those who have had no experience, no practice and possibly have little judgment.

They are very simple, not expensive, and if fol- lowed closely, will ensure success. It is the hope of the writer of this book that the young and inex- perienced housekeeper may find it a real help.

L. M. GURNET.

Popovers

1 Egg
1 Cupful of Flour
1 Cupful of Milk

Beat the egg, and stir flour and milk in slowly, a little flour, then a little milk. Salt a little. This will make a very thin batter. Drop into well- buttered muffin pan, bake in a very hot oven and serve with hot sauce for a pudding, or eat with butter.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1914
Publisher New York, The Macmillan Company
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, In the kitchen Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: – Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) – 13 in a series

October 14th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) – 13 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) - 13 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) - 13 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) - 13 in a series

PREFACE

This volume is intended for use in classes begin- ning the study of foods and cookery. It has been arranged for use in the elementary schools and does not presuppose any training in general science. It is strictly an elementary treatment of the subject.

The book deals with foods, their selection and preparation, and the planning of meals from the nutritive, aesthetic and economic standpoints. The “meal plan” is used in order to make the meal the basis of the work. Through the “Home Problems” the home and school work may be correlated.

The author appreciates the help given in illus- trating the book by the United States Department of Agriculture, the United States Bureau of Stand- ards, the Detroit Stove Works, and the Chambers Manufacturing Company. The author also grate- fully acknowledges the criticisms and suggestions of educators who kindly read the manuscript.

TO THE STUDENT

Have you thought about what you will do when you finish school ?

Perhaps you have decided to be a teacher, a librarian, a stenographer, a doctor, a nurse. Perhaps you are making plans to take a course in high school or college that will fit you for one of these callings ; you would not consider yourself capable of entering any of them without training.

Very probably you will be at some time the manager of a home. Have you thought about the importance of being trained for home-making?

It is only within the past twenty-five years that it has been considered proper for the public schools to train girls for the work which most of them will do for the longest period in their lives, the work of home-making.

Mrs. Ellen H. Richards was the first to say that the schools ought to teach ” right living;” and, largely through her efforts and her inspiration, plans have been worked out whereby girls while in school can be taught many things about right living.

Right living begins with the home. Who makes the home? The man may furnish the money to build and maintain the house, but it is the woman who plans and manages the home. It is her busi- ness to see that the family lives in a sanitary and an attractive house ; that every member of the family has clean, properly selected and well cooked food ; that every one is suitably clothed ; that the family income is wisely spent, and that all in the home are helped to lead a happy and useful life.

No girl should consider the making and managing of a home an easy piece of work, for in fact nothing is harder to do and to do well.

When the girl takes work in school and college that covers all phases of home-making, we say that she is taking a course in Home Economics.


 

THE DINING ROOM

The dining room should be a light, cheerful room, situated so that the sunlight reaches it at some time every day, preferably in the morning. This room should be large enough to permit easy passing behind the chairs when persons are seated around the table.

The walls should be finished in light colors rather than dark, which tend to make the room appear gloomy. The window curtains should be of a kind easily laundered, since draperies in a dining room are apt to hold dirt and odors and need frequent cleaning.

The floor is best made of hard wood, as a rug may then be used instead of a carpet. A dining-room floor would be more sanitary if no covering were used, but the noise made by using a bare floor is annoying to many persons.

The furniture should be plain in design. Wood or cane-seated chairs are perhaps better to use than upholstered, because they are easier to keep clean. A dining-table with a top having a waxed finish is much better than one highly varnished. • The top of the sideboard and serving-table should not be crowded with dishes of various kinds. A dining room is more pleasing with few pictures, or none at all, and with little bric-a-brac or few dishes used as decoration.

When buying a “set” of dishes it is best to select a style with simple decoration or without decoration. Large conspicuous designs and bright colors become tiresome when the dishes are used often. A good quality of china with no decoration is a wise choice for a “set “, because any type of decorated dish looks well with it.

Silver knives and forks should be of the same pattern, but the spoons may be of different design. Silver never looks well unless it is kept polished.

White linen tablecloths and napkins are better to buy than cotton, because linen wears longer and launders much better than cotton. Luncheon sets of various types may be used instead of a tablecloth, and are much easier to launder

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1921
Publisher Boston, Little, Brown, and company
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, In the kitchen Tags:

My Favorite Things: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive

October 9th, 2018 Comments off

Interesting Sites: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive

My Favorite Things: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive

I am not sure exactly where I stumbled across this site, but it is amazing — especially if you are interested in or researching children’s literature. The digital archive allows you to page through books from the comfort of your own home without ever visiting the University of Florida’s Libraries. Of course, you could also visit and see the books up close.

Interesting Sites: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive Aaron wildlands Interesting Sites: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive

Some example covers

The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature in the Department of Special Collections at the University of Florida’s George A. Smathers Libraries contains more than 130,000 books and periodicals published in the United States and Great Britain from the mid-1600s to present day. The Library also has manuscript collections, original artwork, and assorted ephemera such as board games, puzzles, and toys. The Baldwin Library is known for comparative editions of books, with special emphasis on Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim’s Progress, Aesop’s Fables, and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The Library also has the largest collection of Early American Juvenile Imprints of any academic institution in the United States.

 

Other strengths and distinctions of the Baldwin Library include: marginalia and inscriptions, the Hans Christian Andersen Awards Collection, Little Golden Books, religious tracts, and illustrated editions from the Golden Age of Children’s Literature. Scholars worldwide use the Baldwin Library for research in fables, fairy tales, alphabet books, morality tales and religious tracts, conduct of life, gender roles, comparison of editions, adventure stories, and boys’/girls’ series books.

Interesting Sites: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive

Interesting Sites: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Digital Archive

Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

September 30th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

Ourhomecyclopedi00darl 0010Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

PREFACE

We take pleasure in presenting a book to the public with an arrangement of subjects entirely different from any other published, and designed especially to save much valuable time to the housewife.

The subjects are so arranged that one has only to turn through the book, and from the headlines find each chapter in alphabetical order, making it easy to turn at once to any subject or recipe desired, without even turning to the table of contents.

The object of this book is to give housekeepers the most improved and scientific cookery as developed by the most practical schools of cookery of the present day; keeping in mind economy as far as consistent with well cooked and healthful dishes. Bad cooking is not only a waste of health but of money. This book, no doubt, will save many times its cost to each purchaser. The object being to assist the housekeeper in a practical way, the authors have not catered to the epicure, hence the highly seasoned and expensive dishes have been omitted.

Cook books previously published, have been confined to recipes only, while the general information which is so essential, has been omitted. We have taken a step forward, in giving at the commencement of each chapter, general directions that will apply to the recipes following.

To illustrate, take for instance chapter seven, “Canning Fruit.” Before giving any recipes, valuable instruction is given on those essential points, as preparing the cans, the tops, the rubbers, the kind of cans to be used, heating the fruit, and a complete table giving the quantity of sugar required per quart, and the time for boiling any kind of fruit. In the chapters on poultry, game, and marketing, full information is given on selecting meats of all kinds, where the best cuts of meat are to be found, the carving etc.

In the mechanical arrangement of this volume, the publishers have made it far excell any other cook book ever published.

The type is large and clear, the leaves are broad, and the book is so bound that it will remain open at any point desired, thus saving one’s time in frequent opening, as is the case with books of narrow pages.

The initial letters are entirely new features, and were designed and copyrighted especially for this book. The artist was instructed to represent each chapter in its initial letter. How well he has done so the reader can judge when looking through the book. So valuable and so cheap a book as this one should be owned and used (not borrowed) by every housekeeper.

If this book should be the means of bringing into the household, happiness, peace and contentment; if the husband hereafter sits at the table with a smiling and satisfied countenance, and the wife feels less of care and anxiety, then its mission will have been accomx^lished.

‘^Get a husband what he likes.

And save a thousand household strikes.”


 

Excellent Mead. Three pounds brown sugar, one pint of molasses, one-fourth pound tartaric acid; mix, pour over them two quarts boiling water, stir till dissolved. When cold, add half ounce essence sassafras and bottle. When you wish to drink it, put three tablespoonfuls of it in a tumbler, fill half full with ice water, add a little more than one-fourth teaspoonful soda. An excellent summer beverage.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1889
Publisher Detroit, Mich., The Mercantile publishing co.
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags: