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Historical Cooking Books: – Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) – 13 in a series

October 14th, 2018 No comments

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) – 13 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) - 13 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) - 13 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Foods and cookery and the care of the house; by Mary Lockwood Matthews (1921) - 13 in a series

PREFACE

This volume is intended for use in classes begin- ning the study of foods and cookery. It has been arranged for use in the elementary schools and does not presuppose any training in general science. It is strictly an elementary treatment of the subject.

The book deals with foods, their selection and preparation, and the planning of meals from the nutritive, aesthetic and economic standpoints. The “meal plan” is used in order to make the meal the basis of the work. Through the “Home Problems” the home and school work may be correlated.

The author appreciates the help given in illus- trating the book by the United States Department of Agriculture, the United States Bureau of Stand- ards, the Detroit Stove Works, and the Chambers Manufacturing Company. The author also grate- fully acknowledges the criticisms and suggestions of educators who kindly read the manuscript.

TO THE STUDENT

Have you thought about what you will do when you finish school ?

Perhaps you have decided to be a teacher, a librarian, a stenographer, a doctor, a nurse. Perhaps you are making plans to take a course in high school or college that will fit you for one of these callings ; you would not consider yourself capable of entering any of them without training.

Very probably you will be at some time the manager of a home. Have you thought about the importance of being trained for home-making?

It is only within the past twenty-five years that it has been considered proper for the public schools to train girls for the work which most of them will do for the longest period in their lives, the work of home-making.

Mrs. Ellen H. Richards was the first to say that the schools ought to teach ” right living;” and, largely through her efforts and her inspiration, plans have been worked out whereby girls while in school can be taught many things about right living.

Right living begins with the home. Who makes the home? The man may furnish the money to build and maintain the house, but it is the woman who plans and manages the home. It is her busi- ness to see that the family lives in a sanitary and an attractive house ; that every member of the family has clean, properly selected and well cooked food ; that every one is suitably clothed ; that the family income is wisely spent, and that all in the home are helped to lead a happy and useful life.

No girl should consider the making and managing of a home an easy piece of work, for in fact nothing is harder to do and to do well.

When the girl takes work in school and college that covers all phases of home-making, we say that she is taking a course in Home Economics.


 

THE DINING ROOM

The dining room should be a light, cheerful room, situated so that the sunlight reaches it at some time every day, preferably in the morning. This room should be large enough to permit easy passing behind the chairs when persons are seated around the table.

The walls should be finished in light colors rather than dark, which tend to make the room appear gloomy. The window curtains should be of a kind easily laundered, since draperies in a dining room are apt to hold dirt and odors and need frequent cleaning.

The floor is best made of hard wood, as a rug may then be used instead of a carpet. A dining-room floor would be more sanitary if no covering were used, but the noise made by using a bare floor is annoying to many persons.

The furniture should be plain in design. Wood or cane-seated chairs are perhaps better to use than upholstered, because they are easier to keep clean. A dining-table with a top having a waxed finish is much better than one highly varnished. • The top of the sideboard and serving-table should not be crowded with dishes of various kinds. A dining room is more pleasing with few pictures, or none at all, and with little bric-a-brac or few dishes used as decoration.

When buying a “set” of dishes it is best to select a style with simple decoration or without decoration. Large conspicuous designs and bright colors become tiresome when the dishes are used often. A good quality of china with no decoration is a wise choice for a “set “, because any type of decorated dish looks well with it.

Silver knives and forks should be of the same pattern, but the spoons may be of different design. Silver never looks well unless it is kept polished.

White linen tablecloths and napkins are better to buy than cotton, because linen wears longer and launders much better than cotton. Luncheon sets of various types may be used instead of a tablecloth, and are much easier to launder

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1921
Publisher Boston, Little, Brown, and company
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, In the kitchen Tags:

Pescetto, Fish and Seafood, Milano, Italy via Instagram

October 2nd, 2018 No comments

Pescetto, Fish and Seafood, Milano, Italy via Instagram

Pescetto, Fish and Seafood, Milano, Italy

If you love fish, hit up Pescetto in North Milan. They hand you a glass of wine when you enter and wait to order. Seafood is as fresh as it can be and prepared however you wish. Busy, energetic and great food. 

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Learn more about Milan

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Books available at the LA Public Library

Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

September 30th, 2018 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: – Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) – 12 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

Ourhomecyclopedi00darl 0010Historical Cooking Books: - Our home cyclopedia. Cookery and housekeeping by Edgar S Darling (1889) - 12 in a series

PREFACE

We take pleasure in presenting a book to the public with an arrangement of subjects entirely different from any other published, and designed especially to save much valuable time to the housewife.

The subjects are so arranged that one has only to turn through the book, and from the headlines find each chapter in alphabetical order, making it easy to turn at once to any subject or recipe desired, without even turning to the table of contents.

The object of this book is to give housekeepers the most improved and scientific cookery as developed by the most practical schools of cookery of the present day; keeping in mind economy as far as consistent with well cooked and healthful dishes. Bad cooking is not only a waste of health but of money. This book, no doubt, will save many times its cost to each purchaser. The object being to assist the housekeeper in a practical way, the authors have not catered to the epicure, hence the highly seasoned and expensive dishes have been omitted.

Cook books previously published, have been confined to recipes only, while the general information which is so essential, has been omitted. We have taken a step forward, in giving at the commencement of each chapter, general directions that will apply to the recipes following.

To illustrate, take for instance chapter seven, “Canning Fruit.” Before giving any recipes, valuable instruction is given on those essential points, as preparing the cans, the tops, the rubbers, the kind of cans to be used, heating the fruit, and a complete table giving the quantity of sugar required per quart, and the time for boiling any kind of fruit. In the chapters on poultry, game, and marketing, full information is given on selecting meats of all kinds, where the best cuts of meat are to be found, the carving etc.

In the mechanical arrangement of this volume, the publishers have made it far excell any other cook book ever published.

The type is large and clear, the leaves are broad, and the book is so bound that it will remain open at any point desired, thus saving one’s time in frequent opening, as is the case with books of narrow pages.

The initial letters are entirely new features, and were designed and copyrighted especially for this book. The artist was instructed to represent each chapter in its initial letter. How well he has done so the reader can judge when looking through the book. So valuable and so cheap a book as this one should be owned and used (not borrowed) by every housekeeper.

If this book should be the means of bringing into the household, happiness, peace and contentment; if the husband hereafter sits at the table with a smiling and satisfied countenance, and the wife feels less of care and anxiety, then its mission will have been accomx^lished.

‘^Get a husband what he likes.

And save a thousand household strikes.”


 

Excellent Mead. Three pounds brown sugar, one pint of molasses, one-fourth pound tartaric acid; mix, pour over them two quarts boiling water, stir till dissolved. When cold, add half ounce essence sassafras and bottle. When you wish to drink it, put three tablespoonfuls of it in a tumbler, fill half full with ice water, add a little more than one-fourth teaspoonful soda. An excellent summer beverage.

 


Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Publication date 1889
Publisher Detroit, Mich., The Mercantile publishing co.
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English

Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Recipe Tags:

Comb Honey 🍯 in Breakfast Buffet, Hotel King Mokinba, Milano via Instagram

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Riseolatte 60’s Themed Ristorante, Milan via Instagram

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Riseolatte 60’s Themed Ristorante, Milan via Instagram

Formica tables, The Beatles on the radio and wonderful food. Found via Yelp.

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Want to Learn more about Milan? Check out these books from your local library and Amazon!

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Books available at the LA Public Library

A taste of Sicily in Milan via Instagram

September 8th, 2018 Comments off

A taste of Sicily in Milan Granita at Ammu via Instagram

Ammu is basically Sicilian for “Yum!” Cute name and great granita.

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Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Want to Learn more about Sicily? Check out these books from your local library and Amazon!

Learn more about Milan

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Books available at the LA Public Library