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Down the street, Milano, Italia via Instagram

February 23rd, 2019 No comments

What have you spotted along your way? Share in the comments!

Down the street, Milano, Italia via Instagram

Down the street, Milano, Italia

Just one of the many amazing views as we walked about Milan last September. Along with their grand boulevards there are many tiny streets — almost alleys really — like this which give frames views of piazzi, churches and other architecture in the city. It is at times like these where you begin to wonder what year it is until you see something modern that snaps you back to your own time.

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Download 569 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art via Open Culture

February 23rd, 2019 No comments
More intellectual enrichment for FREE with these museum books. Expand your mind! — Douglas
 
 

You could pay $118 on Amazon for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s catalog The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry. Or you could pay $0 to download it at MetPublications, the site offering “five decades of Met Museum publications on art history available to read, download, and/or search for free.”

If that strikes you as an obvious choice, prepare to spend some serious time browsing MetPublications’ collection of free art books and catalogs.

[…]

Read Download 569 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art via Open Culture





An interesting link found among my daily reading

Napoleon as a Greek god, Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano, Italia via Instagram

February 20th, 2019 No comments

What would your sculpture look like? Share in the comments!

Napoleon as a Greek god, Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano, Italia via Instagram

Napoleon as a Greek god, Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano, Italia

Kind of a grand sculpture, don’t you think? But then Napoleon was known for an extremely large ego, so perhaps this explains it. 
Quite a dramatic centerpiece to the museum which also hosts the Accademia di Belle Arti (School of Fine Arts)

We passed through on our way to the Reunification museum and the Botanic Gardens seen in earlier pictures. 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November via Gresham College

February 19th, 2019 No comments
I regularly watch these Gresham College lectures on a variety of topics — probably around 3-4 lectures a month, depending on the topics. Lectures like this have been by own version of a Master’s Degree, since I am not that fond of classroom learning. With each lecture, you gain quite a deep understanding of the topic at hand and often there are 3-5 lectures that follow a theme over the course of few months. — Douglas

Gresham College was founded in 1597 and has been providing free lectures within the City of London for over 400 years.

The College was established out of the will of Sir Thomas Gresham, one of the most influential and important men across the Tudor and Elizabethan periods. Sir Thomas made himself indispensable as the financial agent for four successive monarchs from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I. As well as founding the Royal Exchange, Sir Thomas left proceeds in his will for the foundation of Gresham College.

 

This lecture re-examines how the First World War ended. Why did Germany request a ceasefire and why did the Allies and America grant one?

A lecture by Professor David Stevenson, London School of Economics
07 November 2018 6pm (UK time)
https://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-an…

Audio, Video, Transcript and Slides are available on the Gresham College web site.

This lecture will re-examine how the First World War ended, anticipating the centenary commemorations in 2018. It will discuss both why Germany requested a ceasefire, and why the Allies and America granted one. It will argue that the German army was near collapse, and that Germany was not defeated by a ‘stab in the back’ at home. None the less, the Allies had good reasons not to press on to Berlin.

Watch The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November via Gresham College






An interesting link found among my daily reading

Doorways of Milano via Instagram

February 18th, 2019 No comments

What do doorways mean to you? Share in the comments!

Doorways of Milano via Instagram

Doorways of Milano

Who lives here? What do they do? Where does this doorway lead?

I found myself asking these questions every time we passed an entry like this. I collected many such pictures on our trip to Milan last September and have often done the same on past trips to Italy. They are always so fascinating especially when they give such tantalizing views of what lies beyond. 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The Library of Congress Makes Thousands of Fabulous Photos, Posters & Images Free to Use & Reuse via Open Culture

February 16th, 2019 No comments
Another great collection of free-to-use imagery care of your very own Library of Congress. Your tax dollars (and history) at work! — Douglas
 
The history of the venerable Library of Congress demonstrates the vast importance that the founders of the U.S. accorded to reading and studying. It may be one of the country’s most durable institutions, “the oldest federal cultural institution in the nation,” it proclaims. While partisan rancor, war, and violence recur, the LoC has stolidly held an ever-increasingly diverse collection of artifacts sitting peacefully alongside each other on several hundred miles of shelves, a monument to the life of the mind that ought to get more attention.

Enjoy The Majestic Architecture of Bath Abbey With This Amazing View On Pillows, iPhone Cases, Totes and more! [For Sale]

February 13th, 2019 No comments

The Art Institute of Chicago Now Offers Unrestricted Access to over 52,000 High-Resolution Images from Their Collection via Colossal

February 11th, 2019 No comments
While there is something special in seeing famous artwork in-person, having access online is certainly better than having no access at all and The Art Institute of Chicago has opened up a huge collection of images from artwork in their collection. Even better, you can poke, prod and get an up-close view (through zooming) at these images without the security guard chasing you away. (SMILE) This sometimes happens to me as I like to get close to see brush work and how the paint is laid upon the canvas. — Douglas
 
The Art Institute of Chicago recently announced the release of tens of thousands of images from their collection to the public domain, providing high resolution access to the thick paint strokes of Van Gogh’s “The Bedroom,” the eerie light of Edvard Munch’s “The Girl by the Window,” or the pointillism used in George Seurat’s famous “A Sunday on La Grande Jatte — 1884.″ The works have been made available under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license, which presents the works without copyright. Visitors to the Art Institute’s website also can experience enhanced viewing for each image by zooming in on the paintings, drawings, and other artworks with more detail than before. The current image count is at 53,438, however the Art Institute explains that this number will continue to expand regularly. You can begin your dig into their vast store of artworks by visiting this online research tool. 

Arco della Pace at Sunset, Milano Italia

February 10th, 2019 No comments

When do you take photos? Share in the comments!

Arco della Pace at Sunset, Milano Italia

Arco della Pace at Sunset, Milano, Italia

We were walking through Parco Sempione on our way to dinner and caught the Arch of Piece in the late afternoon light. This is actually the back side of the arch. I would have had to be there in the morning to get light on the front . That said, I think I have photos of that illuminated later in the evening. 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis – 24 in a series

February 10th, 2019 No comments

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis – 24 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a series

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


Risotto with Ham

Cut into small pieces one ounce of raw ham, fat and lean. Chop up fine a small piece of onion, and put it with the ham into a frying-pan with one-half a table- spoon of butter. Fry slowly until the ham and onions are golden. Then add one-half cup of uncooked rice; when it has cooked for a few minutes, add twice its height of bouillon (or water), salt and pepper, a dash of nutmeg, and mix well and allow it to boil for twenty minutes over a good fire. Then take off the stove, add two tablespoons of butter and two tablespoons of Parmesan cheese grated; mix well and serve.


Publication date 1912
Publisher New York and London, Harper & brothers
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English
 
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

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