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Posts Tagged ‘home school’

Home School: Identifying People in Old Film – 1911 A Trip Through New York City (VLOG #41) via GeneaVlogger on YouTube [Video]

September 7th, 2020 Comments off

A great story on how old films, now uploaded to YouTube and elsewhere can hold genealogical resources for those researching families or general history. Also, just a great example of how to approach any research project. — Douglas

Home School: Identifying People in Old Film - 1911 A Trip Through New York City (VLOG #41) via GeneaVlogger on YouTube [Video]

Also Check out the Update Video, where I interview a living descendant of the Lochowicz family

In this video I discuss how I was able to identify people in the film 1911 A Trip Through New York City. In one scene of the video there is a well to do looking family being driven around by a chauffeur. The license plate on the car can be clearly seen as 65465, so I wondered if I could identify them through this little piece of information.

I learned through the Federal Highway Administration that there were 81,370 auto-mobiles registered in NY by 1911. I also learned registration was published publicly and quickly found a listing for license plate 65465 in the Brooklyn Life Magazine showing a June 12th, 1911 registration E.M.F. – Mrs. Lochwicz 548 Eighth Street. The car in the video definitely looked like a 1911 E.M.F. Model 30 Touring Car, so I tried to find the family in the 1910 census and was able to find them living at 548 Eighth Street. The household consisted of six people; Head of house Florian Lochowicz, his wife Antoinette Lochowicz (listed as Antonie in the census), their children Francis, Emily, and Elsie, and a servant named Mary Moriarty.

Florian Lochowicz was born in Posen in 1871 and immigrated to America in 1890. His wife Antoinette was a distant cousin of his and she was the daughter of Konstantyn Cornelius Lochowicz and Julia Hectus. Konstantyn had immigrated in 1864, possibly due to the January Uprising in Poland. Florian worked as a barber and became very prominent because J.P. Morgan was patron of Florian’s. Florian died unexpectedly in 1918 but was worth $70,000 at the time of his death. His wife continued running the Barbershops into the 1950s and still lived at their Brownstone home in NYC at 548 Eighth Street.



Learn Something New: Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter

August 30th, 2020 Comments off
Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter
 
Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter
 

The John Muir Laws blog features lots of educational resources about nature journaling and sketching in a variety of mediums, intermixed with conservation information. Also offers resources for educators.

Some of the good stuff (a sample, there’s too much to link, the whole blog archive is a treasure trove)

5 minute landscape in watercolor pencil

How to draw: birds mammals plants

Step by step: watercolor iris in colored pencilnorthern parula with watercolor

Read Nature journaling and conservation via MetaFilter


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Photography Ideas & Inspiration -Simple techniques to help you create striking & dynamic photographs via Andrew Brooks On YouTube [Video]

July 22nd, 2020 Comments off

Home School: Photography Ideas & Inspiration -Simple techniques to help you create striking & dynamic photographs via Andrew Brooks On YouTube [Video]

In this film we look at some simple ideas to help you build on your creative photography skills. Looking at how to make the most out interesting locations and also how you can explore the world using photography.

00:08 – Overview of how I work through photography ideas while shooting
04:17 – Order, form and symmetry
09:25 – Low angle perspective
12:24 – Frame within a frame
15:20 – Close-up details
19:12 – Unexpected details, patterns and textures
22:47 – Historical recording, research using photographs
24:53 – Delicate and subtle light
27:53 – Painterly landscapes
29:24 – Colours
31:12 – Minimal photography
32:26 – Low light
36:12 – Strange and playful ideas

 

Home School: Free to Use and Reuse: Maps of Cities via Library of Congress Blog

May 27th, 2020 Comments off

Cities grow, adapt and change, like all living things. The Library’s map collections show this in all sorts of unexpected ways, offering a vision of days gone by, of what “normal” once looked like.  We present you with some fascinating glimpses of the cities of yesteryear in this edition of the Library’s Free to Use and Reuse sets of copyright-free images.

The good news about these, if you haven’t seen them before, is that they are yours for the taking — print them out, blow them up into huge posters, use them for laptop screensavers. It’s your choice. In the past few months, we’ve highlighted classic movie theaters, genealogy, maps of discovery and exploration and so on, but there are lots more.

Read Free to Use and Reuse: Maps of Cities via Library of Congress Blog


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: The 500-year-old bones of African slaves tell a traumatic story via Ars Technica

May 23rd, 2020 Comments off

Archaeologists found the bones of three young African men in a 500-year-old mass grave in what is now Mexico City. The chemical makeup of their bones sheds light on their earlier lives in Africa, and forensic analysis reveals hard, painful lives and young deaths.

How the dead speak

Archaeologists unearthed the mass grave in 1992 while digging a new subway line in Mexico City. Five hundred years earlier, the site had been the grounds of the Hospital Real de San José de los Naturales. The Spanish colonizers had built the hospital to treat indigenous people—that’s what “los Naturales” means in Spanish—but these three men were African, not North or Central American. Their bones radiocarbon-dated to the 1500s CE, which makes them part of an important but often anonymous group of people: the first African people abducted in their homelands and brought across the Atlantic Ocean to European colonies in the Americas.

Read The 500-year-old bones of African slaves tell a traumatic story via Ars Technica


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Creative Photography Exercises to do at Home (video) via Digital Photography School

May 20th, 2020 Comments off
 
Already bored at home? Well, don’t you worry because the COOPH photographers do their best even during this extraordinary time to provide you with fresh ideas and inspiration. They put together a list of creative things you can shoot during your time at home. Equipment or props? They only used things that you should already have in your home, so you can start shooting right away!
Find more books on Bookshop and Help Indie Book Stores!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Send Your Kids to Design School With Free Lessons From the Frank Lloyd Wright Virtual Classroom via Departures

May 12th, 2020 Comments off
 
While we won’t call entertaining and educating kids stuck at home an easy task, we can at least say there are plenty of places stepping up to fill the virtual void. That includes museums offering virtual tours, destinations providing virtual views, and even national parks hosting virtual hikes, all of which make for excellent virtual field trips. But, if your kid is more into math and science now’s their time to shine thanks to The Frank Lloyd Wright Virtual Classroom.
 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright for Kids: His Life and Ideas


Home School: Why do Ex-British Colonies use Dollars Instead of Pounds? via History Matters on YouTube

May 4th, 2020 Comments off
You’ll notice that many ex-British Colonies, like Australia, Canada and New Zealand don’t use pounds like their former British overlords but instead use dollars. Why? What caused these nations to switch currencies and why did they prefer America’s style of currency of the Britain’s? Find out in this video, the latest in my very short, animated historical documentaries (about history).

Watch Why do Ex-British Colonies use Dollars Instead of Pounds? via History Matters on YouTube

Home School: Why didn’t Mao Conquer Taiwan? via History Matters on YouTube [History]

April 28th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: The Spherical Earth Society via Google Maps Mania

April 26th, 2020 Comments off

Currently the British Library is busy digitizing its collection of around 150 globes and making them available as 3D interactive visualizations. Not wanting to be outdone the National Maritime Museum has also released a virtual 3D visualization of one of its historical globes.

The Mercator Terrestrial Globe was made by Gerard Mercator in 1541. Ten years later, in 1551, he made a companion celestial globe. You can also view 3d versions of Mercator’s Earth Globe and Mercator’s Celestial Globe on the University of Lausanne’s website.

Read The Spherical Earth Society via Google Maps Mania




An interesting link found among my daily reading