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On This Day On My Word...


2018 - Family Christmas 1965 with Grandparents and cousins via My Instagram
2018 - Channel Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis), Santa Cruz Island via My Instagram
2018 - Column Capital at Getty Villa via My Instagram
2017 - Noted: Amazon brings Alexa to the iPhone
2017 - Step in and smell the woods with these tops, scarves, sleeves and cases – 20% Off Everything Today
2017 - Agave in Black and White
2016 - Azalea #azalea #flowers #nature #naturephotography #plants #garden #gardenersnotebook #storrierstearnsjapanesegarden #storrierstearns via Instagram [Photo]
2016 - Settling in for a hit of music and murder! A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder #theater #ahmanson #ahmansontheatre #losangeles #la #entertainment #nightout via Instagram [Photo]
2016 - Window into the garden #tree #flowers #plants #garden #gardenersnotebook #nature #outdoors #japanese #japanesegarden via Instagram [Photo]
2016 - In the new greenhouse today. #garden #greenhouse #outdoors #nature #gardenersnotebook #garden #grow #plants #flowers #tree via Instagram [Photo]



Parents Rejoice! Sesame Workshop Has Made 110 Sesame Street eBooks Free via Gizmodo

March 27th, 2020 No comments

If your recent transition to working from home every day was made all the more challenging with a house full of kids not able to go to school, Big Bird and his Sesame Street gang are offering a little relief by making 110 ebooks for kids absolutely free on all the major online book platforms.

Accessing the free titles, which include everything from books teaching kids timely lessons like sitting still to sparking an interest in becoming the President one day, does require access to a mobile device like a smartphone, tablet, or ereader. But the Sesame Workshop has extended this offer to platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, Google Play, Barnes & Noble Nook, and even Kobo, with no specified expiration date just yet.

An Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Sourdough Starter and Bread via Kitchn

March 25th, 2020 No comments
An Absolute Beginner's Guide to Sourdough Starter and Bread via Kitchn
As we stay home, wait out this crisis, and bake our hearts out, sourdough is surging. No yeast needed, sourdough lets anyone turn flour, water, and time into absolutely spectacular bread. If you’ve thought about trying sourdough yourself, now is the time. Today I and the rest of the Kitchn team are kicking off Sourdough for Beginners, the perfect starting place for a baking adventure. Are you in?
Read An Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Sourdough Starter and Bread via Kitchn




An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Monarchs by the Millions: Welcome to Butterfly Forest via Great Big Story On YouTube [Video]

March 25th, 2020 No comments
The largest insect migration in the world ends each year in Michoacán, Mexico. Millions of monarch butterflies travel from the United States and Canada to pass the cold months in the towering trees of this beautiful forest. On their incredible journey, the butterflies travel around 2,800 miles.

A bunch of Amazon kids shows are now free even if you’re not a Prime member via TechHive

March 23rd, 2020 No comments

Attention parents with school-aged kids who have way too much time on their hands: Amazon has opened up 40 of its most popular family shows to stream for free to all, meaning you don’t need to be a Prime member to enjoy them.

Among the titles available are full seasons of Amazon animated originals such as Bug Diaries and Pete the Cat, as well as older fare including Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street and Just Add Magic. Additionally, PBS Kids has taken down the Prime paywall for much of its content, so shows such as Arthur and Caillou are now free. You can browse the full selection of titles on a dedicated page, but it’s unclear how long the offer will last or whether new shows will be added over time.

Coronavirus Kitchen: Risotto Milanese

March 23rd, 2020 No comments

Sunday night was the night for Risotto all milanese (Saffron Risotto in the Style of Milan). This is one of our “Recipes in Rotation” that we make about once a month. Rosanne had spent Saturday making stock and we often use it to make risotto and soup. The recipe is below. It is quite tasty. You can serve it with your favorite vegetables like asparagus, spinach, cauliflower, broccoli and more. 

Recipe Below

Sweating the onions

The first stock goes in

Adding some of the saffron steeped in the warm stock

Ready to eat


Risotto alla milanese RISOTTO, MILAN STYLE

For 6 persons 1 quart Homemade Meat Broth (page 10) OR 1 cup canned chicken broth mixed with 3 cups of water
2 tablespoons diced beef marrow, pancetta, or prosciutto
2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots or yellow onion
5 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups raw Italian Arborio rice
1/3 teaspoon powdered saffron OR 1/2 teaspoon chopped whole saffron, dissolved in 1 1/2 cups hot broth or water
Salt, if necessary
Freshly ground pepper, about 4 twists of the mill or more to taste cup
freshly grated Parmesan cheese

1. Bring the broth to a slow, steady simmer.

2. In a heavy-bottomed casserole, over medium-high heat, saute the beef marrow and shallots in 3 tablespoons of the butter and all the oil. As soon as the shallots become translucent, add the rice and stir until it is well coated. Saute lightly for a few moments and then add 1/2 cup of the simmering broth, about a ladleful. Proceed accord-ing to the basic directions for making risotto (page 180), adding a ladleful of hot broth as the rice dries out, and stirring it very frequently to prevent it from sticking. After 15 minutes add half the dissolved saffron. When the rice has dried out, add the rest of the saffron. ( The later you add the saffron, the stronger the taste and aroma of saffron will be at the end. Herbs that call too much attention to themselves are a rude intrusion upon the general harmony of a dish, but if you like a stronger saffron presence wait another 5 to 8 minutes before adding the diluted saffron. But be careful it doesn’t upstage your risotto.) When the saffron liquid has been absorbed, finish cooking the risotto with hot broth. (If you run out of broth, add water.)

3. When the rice is done, tender but al dente, firm to the bite, taste for salt. ( If the broth was salty, you might not need any. Con-sider, too, the saltiness of the cheese you will be adding.) Add a few twists of pepper to taste, and turn off the heat. Add 2 tablespoons of butter and all the cheese and mix thoroughly. Spoon into a hot platter and serve with a bowl of freshly grated cheese on the side.

MENU SUGGESTIONS Risotto Milan Style is traditionally served with Braised Veal Shanks, Milan Style ( page 256), one of the rare instances when a first course is served together with the meat course in an Italian menu. It is a well-justified exception, because the two dishes are an ideal complement to each other. This risotto can also be served as a regular first course when the second course is a roasted or braised meat or fowl.

Historical Cooking Books – 49 in a series – Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions

March 22nd, 2020 No comments

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 49 in a series – Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions

Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions  with correction 0000

Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions  with correction 0001

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

 

RATION HINTS.

1. To clarify fat for cooking:—

(a) Put into saucepan with plenty of water. Bring to the boil, then stand in a cool place till set. Lift out the set fat, scrape any sediment from the under side. All gravy and sediment will remain in saucepan.

(b) Melt fat and add a potato cut in quarters. When the potato is browned, and the fat stops bubbling, strain the fat through a double cheese cloth and store in a cool, dry place.

• • • •

Substitute for Whipped Cream.

2. Add a sliced banana to the white of an egg, and beat until very stiff. The banana will dissolve.

• • • •

Instead of Dry Toast.

To Those Who Like Their Bread Buttered Before It Is Toasted.

3. Did you ever try bacon dripping instead of the hard-to-get butter? Just spread it on lightly before toasting.

• • • •

How to Tell When a Cake is Done.

4. If layer cake pan is used, press very lightly on top of cake with flat of your finger. If the slight dent springs back, cake is done. If deep pan or loaf pan is used, insert a wire cake tester, or if you do not have one, a clean straw in centre of cake. If it comes out dry, without dough sticking to it, your cake is finished baking.

• • • •

To Save Sugar. . .

5. To save sugar add pinch of soda when stewing fruit.

Read More

 



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Some of our favorite things to watch on Netflix and YouTube

March 22nd, 2020 No comments

Home School: Whale experts launch free, virtual marine biology camp to entertain and inform kids via GeekWire

March 22nd, 2020 No comments

The scientists running Seattle-based Oceans Initiative more typically apply their marine mammal expertise to research on endangered orcas or conservation of white-sided dolphins in Washington’s Puget Sound.

But the upside-down world of the new coronavirus and the closure of their nearly 6-year-old daughter’s school inspired them this week to launch what they’ve dubbed their Virtual Marine Biology Camp.

Home School: Download 435 High Resolution Images from John J. Audubon’s The Birds of America via Open Culture

March 21st, 2020 No comments
While we are all stuck at home, we might as well learn something. Check out these amazing Audubon bird painting then get outside yourself. — Douglas
 
 

In our experience, bird lovers fall into two general categories:

Keenly observant cataloguers like John James Audubon …

And those of us who cannot resist assigning anthropomorphic personalities and behaviors to the 435 stars of Audubon’s The Birds of America, a stunning collection of prints from life-size watercolors he produced between 1827 and 1838.

Our suspicions have little to do with biology, but rather, a certain zestiness of expression, an overemphatic beak, a droll gleam in the eye.

The Audubon Society’s newly redesigned website abounds with treasure for those in either camp:

  • Free high res downloads of all 435 plates.
  • Mp3s of each specimen’s call.
  • And vintage commentary that effectively splits the difference between science and the unintentionally humorous locutions of another age.

Coronavirus Kitchen – One Pot Chicken Marsala

March 21st, 2020 No comments

Tonight’s dinner was my own ”cheater” version of chicken marsala – one of Rosanne’s favorite dishes.

My version is a bit of a hodgepodge without a recipe but here my take.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbls Olive Oil
  • 2 tsp corn starch
  • 1 lb chicken breast
  • 1 cup milk or 1/2 cup half-n-half
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup Marsala Wine (or more to taste)
  • 1 tsp oregano or majorum
  • 1 tsp dried parsley
  • 1 lb spaghetti or other pasta
  • 2 tsp butter

Directions:

Heat olive oil in large pan with lid
Season chicken with salt and paper.
Dredge in corn starch and shake off excess
Fry chicken breast until mostly cooked through
Add onions and garlic
Saute onions and garlic
When lightly browned add spaghetti to pan
Add chicken stock, oregano, parsley, stock, marsala wine, milk, butter
Add more stock or water to cover spaghetti, if needed
Season with salt and pepper as desired
Cover with lid and bring to boil, then set heat to low
Simmer until spaghetti is almost cooked through
Remove lid, raise heat to medium and reduce sauce to consistency of your choice
Serve