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We Tried 6 Methods of Caramelizing Onions and Found a Clear Winner via Kitchn

February 18th, 2020 No comments
 
Even though I’ve been cooking personally and professionally for more than a decade, perfectly caramelized onions have always been elusive. This is probably because I’m extremely impatient, and as Slate once famously pointed out, many recipes lie about just how long it really takes to achieve true caramelization (doing it in five minutes is not a thing).
 
Despite that, there is no end to the methods that claim to make the task faster or easier. I was determined to try as many methods as I could find. After some careful research, I found six that looked interesting: a basic stovetop method from Bon Appétit, a quicker (15-minute) method from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, a slow cooker method from the Pioneer Woman, an oven-roasted method from Food Network, an Instant Pot method from Martha Stewart, and finally a stovetop method from Cooks Illustrated that suggested using a little baking soda.

Literally The Best Mix-In for Pasta Ever via Spoon University

February 13th, 2020 No comments
There are a couple of tricks in this article I am going to try in my own kitchen. As we get older, I am finding we need to amp-up the flavors in our foods to keep them appealing. Some say this is due to worn out tastebuds as we age, but I think it also has to do with providing a variety to our palate to keep food interesting and delightful. — Douglas
 
Literally The Best Mix-In for Pasta Ever via Spoon University
I love pasta in all its forms. Recently, I’ve become obsessed with a Youtube channel called Pasta Grannies, which is about (you guessed it) Italian grandmas making all kinds of pasta types. One of the first videos I saw was of a Pasta Granny making su filindeu, or “threads of God,” a Sardinian pasta type that is typically served in a rich broth as a soup to feed travelers on pilgrimages.
Read Literally The Best Mix-In for Pasta Ever via Spoon University


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Historical Cooking Books – 45 in a series – New York World’s Fair cook book: the American kitchen (1939) by Crosby Gaige

February 9th, 2020 No comments

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 45 in a series – New York World’s Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby Gaige

Historical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby GaigeHistorical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby Gaige

Historical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby GaigeHistorical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby Gaige

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

Preface

The association of good food and fairs is traditional in America, its roots going back to the very beginnings of the country to the first live stock fairs held in agricultural communities. At these gatherings of the farming and village gentry there was a seemly display of American food on the hoof, in the raw so to speak. Fine hogs, little lambs that went baa-a, handsome cattle, proud and dignified, chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys, prize pumpkins, rosy apples, superb cabbages — shown, to be sure, not so much as prospective edibles to the admiring throng gath ered around them, but as examples of what the well-stocked farm should have as starters. Progenitors of a nation’s food supply were these displays. Incidentally some of the best things ever eaten by man were carried to these fairs in the basket lunches of the farm wives and vil lagers of the day.

From crossroads fairs we progressed to county and state fairs, and now in 1939 comes the greatest fair the land has ever known — an inter national exhibition representative of every industry and art in our broad continent and reflecting at the same time the arts and industries of nearly every country of the rest of the world.

Now since the character of our fairs has been expanded so widely there, nevertheless, is still an occasion for food to be discussed in rela tion to such an event. I doubt if there will be many basket lunches carried to the New York World’s Fair of 1939. Certainly there will be no need for such burdens, no matter how savory the contents, be cause to feed the hungry thousands who will attend there are distin guished restaurants set up, staffed and operated by foreign exhibitors, with their native dishes superbly cooked by native chefs. And of course, in addition, there will be many American restaurants on the grounds of the New York fair, not to mention the several thousands of tearooms, restaurants, hotel dining rooms and cafes of Manhattan which always function and which will be especially on their toes to appeal to the vis itors of the fair. Basket luncheons indeed!

Just the same, this occasion calls to mind those old-time baskets over flowing with the delicious simples of our early kitchens. And to those good housewives of bygone days whose arts of the kitchen were the forerunners of our modern cookery, I present my gratitude. No attempt has been made in this collection to present a uniform cook book in the pattern of the standard volumes usually prepared. This is a selection of recipes from the six geographical sections of the United States ; count less delicious dishes had to be omitted from each section, for one reason or another, but it is hoped that the most typical and characteristic dishes of each are included. Or if they are so similar to famous dishes of another state, as is often the case, then to avoid repetition they are omitted and other local favorites stressed.

Here is American cookery from coast to coast, and here, too, are some of the dishes you will eat when you visit the World of Tomorrow as it is depicted by the imagination and engineering and skill of those who planned the New York World’s Fair of 1939.

March 1, 1939.



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The Fall-Inspired Sheet Pan Gnocchi We’re Making All Season Long via The Kitchn

November 13th, 2019 Comments off
This sounds like something to try. I could imagine using sweet potatoes instead of the squash, which I don’t  like as much. Certainly an Autumn comfort meal. — Douglas
 
With the holiday season quickly approaching, our schedules are only getting busier — and trying to squeeze in dinner between all the hustle and bustle can be challenging. Enter: this quick sheet pan dinner. Roasting the gnocchi in the oven means you get to skip the step of boiling it altogether, which not only results in a faster, less messy meal, but it also yields crispy, caramelized potato nuggets that are arguably much tastier.
Read The Fall-Inspired Sheet Pan Gnocchi We’re Making All Season Long via The Kitchn



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What I’m Reading: All The President’s Men – 44 in a series – “…and they could count on executive clemency after a few months in jail.”

October 21st, 2019 Comments off

”According to the man on the plane, Hunt had been visiting the four men from Miami for a week, urging them to change their pleas to guilty; their families would be cared for financially, and they could count on executive clemency after a few months in jail. In the enduring CIA fraternity, Hunt, the seasoned case officer, was again passing out the orders to his lower-level operatives. For more than a decade, the men had had unquestioned trust in Hunt, even after he had supervised their participation in the Bay of Pigs operation.”

All The President’s Men by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein

All the presidents men 9781416527572 lg

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Recipe: Cacio e Pepe Pasta Pie via spoon fork bacon

October 3rd, 2019 Comments off
Yum! I love Cacio e Pepe and this sounds and looks like a great way to mix things up a bit. I DO love those crunchy edges. Ummm…nibble-y bits! — Douglas
 
I love love love Cacio e Pepe. Cheese and pepper with pasta, it’s like the pasta version of grilled cheese. Simple and delicious, and you don’t really need to mess with it. We however decided to slightly mess with it. We made it into pasta pie. I love this because you get some crispy pasta on the top, but on the inside you still get all that gooey cheesy sauce. It’s a pretty great combo. Enjoy!
Read Cacio e Pepe Pasta Pie via spoon fork bacon



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6 Holiday Cookies You’ll Want to Bake, Swap, and Share on Repeat via Bon Appetit

September 21st, 2019 Comments off
My family treats Christmas cookie baking as part gladiatorial sport, part opera. The tradition started with my Italian-American grandmother, Erminia, who would push herself and her oven to the limit every December, waking up at 5 a.m. and baking until she had filled every old cookie tin and ancient Tupperware with hermit slices, pizzettes, spritz cookies, anise cookies, biscotti, candy cane twists, Polish rum balls…. It didn’t end until Christmas Day, or until the oven gave out (she went through three). She was a five-foot-tall sugar-dealing spitfire who pushed cookies into the hands of every friend and family member within a hundred-mile radius. The only way she would cut you off is if you forgot to give her the tins back.
Read 6 Holiday Cookies You’ll Want to Bake, Swap, and Share on Repeat via Bon Appetit



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Sip on the Classic Taste of a Whiskey Daisy via The Spruce Eats

September 4th, 2019 Comments off

The whiskey daisy is a classic whiskey cocktail that has long been a favorite among whiskey lovers and cocktail enthusiasts. It is an easy recipe that uses just a few ingredients and it is a perfect cocktail for any occasion.
 
The daisy cocktail is a true classic when it comes to the thousands of cocktail recipes that we have known and loved over the years. There are many daisies and they differ from one another because of the base spirit used. In the case of the whiskey daisy, that base is obviously going to be whiskey but precisely which whiskey to use, well, that is another question.

Read Sip on the Classic Taste of a Whiskey Daisy via The Spruce Eats



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Apple Peel Bourbon Recipe via Food52

September 2nd, 2019 Comments off
Bourbon is my favorite tipple and I made some peach-infused bourbon using perfectly ripe peaches from the farmer’s market a few weeks ago, and this sounds just as tasty. — Douglas
 
This is the best, and booziest, way to use apple peels. I got the idea from Tara Duggan’s “Root to Stalk” (Ten Speed, 2013). Tara suggests serving it over ice, topped with ginger beer and a big squeeze of lime — and I agree. —Marian Bull
Read Apple Peel Bourbon Recipe via Food52



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Tequila Old Fashioned Recipe via Garden & Gun

February 13th, 2019 Comments off
Even in the cocktail-forward South, tequila sometimes gets an unfair rep as the shot of choice for college kids, or something to hide beneath a margarita mix. But a fine tequila, such as Jalisco, Mexico’s Patrón Añejo, is aged in white oak barrels for twelve to fifteen months, and is a smooth, nuanced sipper. The oak imparts a warmth and depth reminiscent of bourbon. Just in time for the Mexican holiday Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead), swap in aged tequila for bourbon in a twist on an Old Fashioned.

 

Find more Old Fashioned Recipes in this book

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An interesting link found among my daily reading