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A Time for Making via Kanopy [Video]

August 22nd, 2020 Comments off
A Time for Making via Kanopy [Video]
 
 

Nine artisans on secluded Gabriola Island in Canada reveal the differences between mass manufactured and authentic locally handmade crafts through intimate portraits of their work and lifestyle.

Watch A Time for Making via Kanopy


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Film Adaptations of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol via Gresham College on YouTube

June 9th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: Film Adaptations of Dickens' A Christmas Carol via Gresham College on YouTube

How do the different film versions of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol reflect the politics and culture of their own particular times?

A lecture by Dr Christine L. Corton, Wolfson College Cambridge
10 December 2019 6PM GMT

A Christmas Carol (1843) is the most filmed and televised of Dickens’ works. Many will warmly remember the 1951 Alastair Sim version, but how many are aware of A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), a propaganda film produced in support of the UN, or The Passions of Carol (1975), which attempted to highlight the evil of the pornographic industry? How do the different versions reflect the politics and culture of their own particular times? What makes a good Carol movie? Is it truth to the original or is it something else?

Visit Gresham College on YouTube


A Christmas Carol: With Original Illustrations In Full Color
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Home School: How KLAUS Was Rendered via Tom Preston on YouTube

April 13th, 2020 Comments off

This is a quick summary of how the film Klaus was lit and colored based on research and a few clips demonstrating the technology used.

Please keep in mind this is based on a handful of interviews and demonstration clips I’ve found online and may not be 100% exactly how the process was done, but I’ve tried my best to summarize the process as clearly as I can. The whole process is still being kept rather secretive and the information is limited.

I freely admit I might be wrong about some of the finer details.

Watch How KLAUS Was Rendered


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter

April 3rd, 2020 Comments off
Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter
MeFite malevolent trawled some lists of public domain movies (lots of great film noir) and put together a new, improved, or at least free version of Netflix. Behold: Voleflix! Includes films featuring Ed Wood, Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn, Vincent Price, Barbara Stanwyck, Cary Grant, Stanley Kubrick, Boris Karloff, Frank Sinatra and more… It also has daft Voleflix Originals and rates your taste in movies from your watchlist. [via mefi projects]
Read Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Gertie the Dinosaur (1914) – World’s 1st Keyframe Animation Cartoon – Winsor McCay via Change Before Going Productions on YouTube

September 3rd, 2019 Comments off
Watch this classic from the very beginning of film. — Douglas
 

Released on September 15th, 1914. Sometimes called the world’s oldest cartoon (erroneously), it is still the first to be created using keyframe animation. This movie required Winsor McCay and his assistant John A. Fitzsimmons (who traced the backgrounds) to create 10,000 drawings, which they inked on rice paper and mounted on cardboard.

Gertie is a dinosaur based on the Brontosaurus (nowadays known as Apatosaurus) skeleton in the American Museum of Natural History. McCay’s employer, William Randolph Hearst, was displeased with McCay’s success outside of the newspapers, and used his contractual power to reduce McCay’s stage activities.

Read Gertie the Dinosaur (1914) – World’s 1st Keyframe Animation Cartoon – Winsor McCay via YouTube



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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Learn Something New: Paper Prints from Film History

July 7th, 2019 Comments off

Today I was spending a bit of my Sunday afternoon watching a documentary on Kanopy, which is free from my local library.

Edison: The Invention Of The Movies, Part 1

As part of the discussion of very early films, a historian shows a “paper print” for The Great Train Robbery. Outwardly, it looks like a reel of film, except that it is a similarly sized roll of photographic paper onto which the individual frames were photographed. This was created as a method of registering films for copyright purposes. Many films were preserved solely because these paper prints long outlasted their nitrate film prints.

Learn Something New: Paper Prints from Film History

I had never heard about these paper prints before despite living with a film historian and delving rather deeply into film history my self. It is always amazing what you can learn each day — oftentimes just by accident.

You can find more on paper print at


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Tiffen Open House & Stabilizer Gear Expo – A Minute in Los Angeles 11 from My Word [Video]

June 5th, 2018 Comments off

Reading – Cinemaps: An Atlas of 35 Great Movies by by Andrew Degraff and‎ A.D. Jameson – 12 in a series

February 26th, 2018 Comments off

I’ll be highlighting books that I am reading (or re-reading) on all sorts of topics this year — Douglas

Reading – Cinemaps: An Atlas of 35 Great Movies by by Andrew Degraff and A.D. Jameson – 12 in a series

Reading - Cinemaps: An Atlas of 35 Great Movies by by Andrew Degraff and  A.D. Jameson - 12 in a series

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See more cinemaps on the author’s web site

All movies take place in a world of their own design and Cinemaps helps to map out those spaces for 35 of our favorite movies from Star Wars to Pulp Fiction to Back to the Future. Each map details the passage of the main charactear, showing how and where they encounter one another, diverge, and meet again throughout the passage the film. This is a new way of understanding films, providing a visual summary of the movies and a piece of art in its own right. A.D Jameson’s essays on each film provide more illumination to the “illuminated” maps showing how one informs the other.

A great gift for movie and map buffs!

** My version of this book was available from the Los Angeles Public Library in print and ebook versions.

From Amazon.com…

This beautifully illustrated atlas of beloved movies is an essential reference for cinephiles, fans of great films, and anyone who loves the art of mapmaking.

Acclaimed artist Andrew DeGraff has created beautiful hand-painted maps of all your favorite films, from King Kong and North by Northwest to The Princess Bride, Fargo, Pulp Fiction, even The Breakfast Club—with the routes of major characters charted in meticulous cartographic detail. Follow Marty McFly through the Hill Valley of 1985, 1955, and 1985 once again as he races Back to the Future. Trail Jack Torrance as he navigates the corridors of the Overlook Hotel in The Shining. And join Indiana Jones on a globe-spanning journey from Nepal to Cairo to London on his quest for the famed Lost Ark. Each map is presented in an 11-by-14-inch format, with key details enlarged for closer inspection, and is accompanied by illuminating essays from film critic A. D. Jameson, who speaks to the unique geographies of each film.

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library.
Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

Previously in (Re)Reading:

My Los Angeles 44 – Bradbury Building, Downtown Los Angeles via Instagram

January 30th, 2018 Comments off

My Los Angeles 43 – Bradbury Building, Downtown Los Angeles via Instagram

January 27th, 2018 Comments off