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Posts Tagged ‘home school’

Home School: Petardier – The Most Dangerous Job in History? via Simple History on YouTube

April 25th, 2020 Comments off

How to Keep Your Photographic Muscles Flexing During the Times of Isolation via Digital Photography School

April 23rd, 2020 Comments off

We’re currently facing challenges that most of us haven’t faced before. How do you keep photographing when you can’t visit interesting locations or meet your models? Here are some ideas for you to exercise your photographic muscles during this time of isolation.

According to where you live, you may be more or less constrained regarding your travel distances. Maybe the problem is not even reaching an adventurous place but you can’t even get to your studio. Whichever is your case, these ideas are meant for you to keep photographing with minimum resources.

Home School: Divine Caesar Augustus, Master of Propaganda – January 1, 2020 via TimeGhost on YouTube [Video]

April 21st, 2020 Comments off

Home School: MoMA Now Offers Free Art Classes Online via Gizmodo

April 19th, 2020 Comments off

While New York’s Museum of Modern Art is closed to the public right now, its virtual doors are open in the form of a few free classes from the museum.

MoMA is offering nine free classes through Coursera:

  • Fashion as Design
  • In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Paining
  • What is Contemporary Art?
  • Art & Ideas: Teaching with Themes
  • Art & Inquiry: Museum Teaching Strategies For Your Classroom
  • Seeing Through Photographs
  • Art & Activity: Interactive Strategies for Engaging with Art
  • Modern Art & Ideas
  • Sheying (taught in Chinese)

Classes take anywhere from 12 to 38 hours to complete and can be done at whatever speed you’d like.

Read MoMA Now Offers Free Art Classes Online via Gizmodo





An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: A Photographer’s Guide To ‘Slow Seeing’ The Beauty In Everyday Nature via NPR.org

April 18th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: A Photographer's Guide To 'Slow Seeing' The Beauty In Everyday Nature via NPR.org

At first glance, you might see a jumble of weeds, a thicket of twigs, a heap of dying leaves. You might be inclined to stop looking at this point.

Janelle Lynch invites you to look closer, and slower. She’d want you to see each image as a world in itself — not an accidental grouping of plant matter, but a well-ordered composition created by nature and fixed in time and space by her 8-by-10-inch large-format camera.

Read A Photographer’s Guide To ‘Slow Seeing’ The Beauty In Everyday Nature via NPR.org




An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Netflix puts free documentaries on YouTube for students and teachers via Engadget

April 17th, 2020 Comments off
To help teachers and students learning from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, Netflix is making a handful of documentaries available for free on its Netflix US YouTube channel. At the moment, there are 10 documentary films and series available, including 13th, Babies, Chasing Coral, Knock Down the House and Our Planet. Each comes with educational resources, like discussion questions, ways to take action and more info. Netflix says it plans to add Q&As with some of the project creators soon.

Home School: Paris Museums Put 100,000 Images Online for Unrestricted Public Use via Kottke

April 16th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: The Vatican Library Goes Online and Digitizes Tens of Thousands of Manuscripts, Books, Coins, and More via Open Culture

April 13th, 2020 Comments off
If any one of us ran our own country, we’d surely drive no small amount of resources toward building an impressive national library. That would be true even if we ran a country the size of the Vatican, the smallest sovereign state in the world — but one that, unsurprisingly, punches well above its weight in terms of the size and historical value of its holdings. “It was in 1451 when Pope Nicholas V, a renowned bibliophile himself, attempted to re-establish Rome as an academic center of global importance,” writes Aleteia’s Daniel Esparza. That formidable task involved first “building a relatively modest library of over 1,200 volumes, including his personal collection of Greek and Roman classics and a series of texts brought from Constantinople.”

Home School: Why Should We Read William Shakespeare? Four Animated Videos Make the Case via Open Culture

April 10th, 2020 Comments off

Sooner or later, we all encounter the plays of William Shakespeare: whether on the page, the stage, or—maybe most frequently these days—the screen. Over four hundred years after his death, Shakespeare is still very much relevant, not only as the most recognizable name in English literature, but also perhaps as its most famous storyteller, even if we don’t recognize his hand in modern adaptations that barely resemble their originals.

But if we can turn Shakespeare’s plays into other kinds of entertainment that don’t require us to read footnotes or sit flummoxed in the audience while actors make archaic jokes, why should we read Shakespeare at all? He can be profoundly difficult to understand, an issue even his first audiences encountered, since he stuffed his speeches not only with hundreds of loan words, but hundreds of his own coinages as well.