Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format
Close

Archive

Archive for the ‘Shared Items’ Category

Home School: Hotel Room Opened With “Privacy” Card! from The Lockopicking Lawyer on YouTube

April 5th, 2020 No comments

Nikon School Online – Free online courses for April via @NikonUSA

April 5th, 2020 No comments
 
Make the most of this time.
Nikon’s mission has always been to empower creators. In these uncertain times, we can do that by helping creators stay inspired, engaged and growing. That’s why we’re providing all of our courses free for the entire month of April. Let’s come out of this even better.

Read Nikon School Online – Free online courses for April via @NikonUSA





An interesting link found among my daily reading

These are the two COVID-19 data sites I incessantly check via Boing Boing

April 4th, 2020 No comments

How to Adapt to a Long-Term Crisis via kottke.org

April 4th, 2020 No comments
How to Adapt to a Long-Term Crisis via kottke.org

From Dr. Aisha Ahmad, some advice for how to adapt to conditions of a long-term crisis like the pandemic we are currently facing. (This was written specifically for educators, but applies to anyone.) First, the necessary sobering bit (italics mine):

The answer to the question everyone is asking — “When will this be over?” — is simple and obvious, yet terribly hard to accept. The answer is never.

Global catastrophes change the world, and this pandemic is very much akin to a major war. Even if we contain the Covid-19 crisis within a few months, the legacy of this pandemic will live with us for years, perhaps decades to come. It will change the way we move, build, learn, and connect. There is simply no way that our lives will resume as if this had never happened. And so, while it may feel good in the moment, it is foolish to dive into a frenzy of activity or obsess about your scholarly productivity right now. That is denial and delusion. The emotionally and spiritually sane response is to prepare to be forever changed.

Read How to Adapt to a Long-Term Crisis via kottke.org


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Children are leading archaeological investigations in Scotland – and enriching whole communities via The Next Web

April 3rd, 2020 No comments

Keig, Aberdeenshire. A gaggle of excited children are instructing community archaeologist Colin Shepherd when to drop a china mug on the floor so that they can see how it breaks on impact.

They will use the results of this experiment to better understand an archaeological find: the broken pieces of an old marmalade jar, last used for breakfast around 100 years ago. The children had recently excavated the jar from woodland in which they usually build dens and play hide and seek as part of an archaeological investigation.

Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter

April 3rd, 2020 No comments
Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter
MeFite malevolent trawled some lists of public domain movies (lots of great film noir) and put together a new, improved, or at least free version of Netflix. Behold: Voleflix! Includes films featuring Ed Wood, Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn, Vincent Price, Barbara Stanwyck, Cary Grant, Stanley Kubrick, Boris Karloff, Frank Sinatra and more… It also has daft Voleflix Originals and rates your taste in movies from your watchlist. [via mefi projects]
Read Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter


An interesting link found among my daily reading

This new quarantine game lets you play with friends from home + your smart speaker via RouteNote Blog

April 3rd, 2020 No comments
 

This party game sets you the task of talking to your Smart Speaker in just the right way to win this new quarantine game.
Hey Robot is a game that’s been building support on Kickstarter and is yet to launch in full. However it’s lovely creators saw everyone getting bored whilst stuck at home self-isolating and have launched a rough version early that is free to play.

You need either an Amazon Alexa or Google Home speaker, they say it doesn’t work so well with phones. You place that near to your computer and call your friends to bring them in and you’re off in one of the two game modes.

To play Hey Robot, you have to make your Smart Speaker say a word or certain phrase without saying it yourself. It’s like taboo with a robotic and sometimes nonsensical player who also happens to have a hell of a lot at their disposal.

Amazon and SXSW will host a 10-day online film festival this month via Input

April 2nd, 2020 No comments
Categories: Shared Items Tags: , ,

Home School: The history of the world according to corn – Chris A. Kniesly via TedEd on YouTube

April 2nd, 2020 No comments

Trace the 9,000 year old history of the domestication of corn, or maize, and its effects on global agriculture.

Corn currently accounts for more than one tenth of our global crop production. And over 99% of cultivated corn is the exact same type: Yellow Dent #2. This means that humans grow more Yellow Dent #2 than any other plant on the planet. So how did this single variety of this single plant become the biggest success story in agricultural history? Chris Kniesly investigates the rise of this wonder-crop.

Lesson by Chris A. Kniesly, directed by Artrake Studio.

Watch The history of the world according to corn – Chris A. Kniesly via TedEd on YouTube

Home School: Evelyn Lambart and Animation: “I was always fascinated by cutouts…” via MetaFilter

April 2nd, 2020 No comments
Evelyn Lambart and Animation:

Stricken with hearing loss from an early age, Lambart flourished at the National Film Board, where she became the first woman animator in Canada. She collaborated with esteemed animator Norman McLaren for many years, notably on the innovative, jazzy Begone Dull Care (1949).

Lambart’s first solo film was The Impossible Map (1947), a quirky, earnest experiment with grapefruit, knives and cartography. Making Movie History: Evelyn Lambart is an excellent 5-minute doc about her career.

Lambart also used her distinctive black-background animation style in The Story of Christmas (1973). Her meticulous cutout process is shown in the NFB documentaries Eleven Moving Moments with Evelyn Lambart (see 32:00) and The Light Fantastick (see 47:00). She died in 1999.