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Archive for the ‘Audio’ Category

Headspace offers free guided meditations and workouts for New Yorkers via Mashable!

April 6th, 2020 No comments
 

New York is the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, so Headspace is bringing a little bit of relief to the Empire State. 

Headspace announced a partnership with Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office to offer free guided meditations, sleep sounds, exercises, and mindfulness content for kids on a New York-specific webpage. In case you’re not aware, Headspace is a popular mindfulness mobile app that offers all of those things under normal circumstances, but usually charges a subscription fee to access everything.

“Now more than ever it’s critical that New Yorkers stay healthy both physically and mentally, and these resources will help people cope with rising levels of stress and anxiety during this unprecedented public health crisis,” Cuomo said in a statement.

The Internet Archive Is Digitizing & Preserving Over 100,000 Vinyl Records: Hear 750 Full Albums Now via Open Culture

March 30th, 2020 No comments
 

There seems to be widespread agreement—something special was lost in the rushed-to-market move from physical media to digital streaming. We have come to admit that some older musical technologies cannot be improved upon. Musicians, producers, engineers spend thousands to replicate the sound of older analog recording technology, with all its quirky, inconsistent operation. And fans buy record players and vinyl records in surprisingly increasing numbers to hear the warm and fuzzy character of their sound.

Neil Young, who has relentlessly criticized every aspect of digital recording, has dismissed the resurgence of the LP as a “fashion statement” given that most new albums released on vinyl are digital masters. But buyers come to vinyl with a range of expectations, writes Ari Herstand at Digital Music News: “Vinyl is an entire experience. Wonderfully tactile…. When we stare at our screens for the majority of our days, it’s nice to look at art that doesn’t glow and isn’t the size of my hand.” Vinyl can feel and look as good as it sounds (when properly engineered).

FREE Audiobooks for kids (and adults) from Audible

March 20th, 2020 Comments off
No need to download or log in or anything. Click the book and start listening immediately! Maybe it’s time you finally read/listened to one of those classics, like Frankenstein, that you have always been meaning to read. — Douglas
 
For as long as schools are closed, we’re open. Starting today, kids everywhere can instantly stream an incredible collection of stories, including titles across six different languages, that will help them continue dreaming, learning, and just being kids.
Read Audible Stories | Audible.com via Audible.com


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Christmas Past – 13 in a series – Hark! the Herald Angels Sing by Trinity Choir (1911)

December 13th, 2019 Comments off

Christmas Past – 13 in a series – Hark! the Herald Angels Sing by Trinity Choir (1911)

Christmas Past - 13in a series - Hark! the Herald Angels Sing by Trinity Choir (1911)

Christmas Hymn; Mixed Voices with orchestra.

Digitized at 78 revolutions per minute. Four stylii were used to transfer this record. They are 3.8mil truncated conical, 2.3mil truncated conical, 2.8mil truncated conical, 3.3mil truncated conical.

Download and Listen to more on Archive.org



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Audio, Christmas, History, Music Tags:

Christmas Past – 4 in a series – A Christmas Carol (1947), Performed by Lionel Barrymore; Richard Hale [Audio]

December 4th, 2019 Comments off

Christmas Past – 4 in a series – A Christmas Carol (1947), Performed by Lionel Barrymore; Richard Hale

Christmas Past - 4 in a series - A Christmas Carol (1947), Performed by Lionel Barrymore; Richard Hale [Audio]

Play and Download This Recording  from the Internet Archive

“Of all the roles I’ve done, the one I’d like best to be remembered for is Scrooge. It is unquestionably one of my favorites.” Lionel Barrymore, Dec. 21, 1947. The New York Times. (Interview with Dorothy O’Leary).

When MGM Records released A Christmas Carol in 1947, Lionel Barrymore had been playing Ebenezer Scrooge for twelve years on the radio. Starting in 1934, CBS presented the Charles Dickens’ classic story each year and it soon became a much loved Christmas tradition. Barrymore, in his radio debut, embodied Scrooge to perfection. As he  revealed in a 1947  New York Times interview, “I seem to shrink and an unnatural meanness of disposition comes over me. I seem to be Scrooge in body and mind.”

Barrymore went on to play the role 17 times before his death in November, 1954, and only the direst of circumstances prevented him from playing it. When his wife died in 1936 he was unable to perform, and his brother John rushed to fill in for him. He also missed the performance of 1938 when serious illness forced Orson Welles to substitute. — Library of Congress

History: How Britain fought Hitler with humour via BBC

December 2nd, 2019 Comments off
It’s a late night in London in 1940, and Austrian exile Robert Lucas is writing at his desk. Bombs are raining down on the city every night, Hitler’s army is winning throughout Europe and the invasion of England has become a genuine prospect. In spite of the air-raid sirens and, as he put it “the hell’s noise of the war machinery” going off all around him, Lucas is focused on the job at hand: to “fight for the souls of the Germans”. He is composing a radio broadcast aimed at citizens of the Third Reich. But this is not a passionate plea for them to come to their senses. This is an attempt to make them laugh.
 
Read How Britain fought Hitler with humour via BBC – Homepage


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Ghosts Of The Internet 2019: An Hour Of Spooky And Silly Halloween Listening! [Audio]

October 30th, 2019 Comments off
Categories: Announcement, Audio, Podcast, Show, Theater Tags:

Huge trove of digitized 78rpm records via kottke.org

September 17th, 2019 Comments off
Another great free collection from the Internet Archive — this time an audio collection instead of images. Dig in and enjoy! — Douglas
 
Through the Great 78 Project, the Internet Archive has been digitizing the audio from 78rpm records produced from 1898 to the 1950s. Over 25,000 high-quality recordings are currently available from artists like Edith Piaf, Irving Berlin, Lena Horne, and Duke Ellington. This preservation is important because the discs are fragile:
Read Huge trove of digitized 78rpm records via kottke.org



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

The Mentoris Project Podcast: Fermi’s Gifts with Author, Kate Fuglei [Audio]

May 20th, 2019 Comments off

I am the technical producer on this podcast which is hosted by my wife, Dr. Rosanne Welch! A true family project! — Douglas

The Mentoris Project Podcast: Fermi's Gifts with Author, Kate Fuglei [Audio]The Mentoris Project Podcast: Fermi's Gifts with Author, Kate Fuglei [Audio]

The Mentoris Project Podcast: Fermi’s Gifts with Author, Kate Fuglei

Hosted by Dr. Rosanne Welch

Listen Now


Today’s guest is Kate Fuglei, author of Fermi’s Gifts: A Novel Based on the life of Enrico Fermi. Fermi is known as the “architect of the nuclear age” and for his work on the Manhattan Project during World War II. 


About the Author

An actress, singer, and writer, Fuglei created a one-woman show, Rachel Calof,  based on the memoir of a Jewish homesteader, and has performed it around America. It won Best Musical at the 2015 United Solo Festival in New York City. Fuglei has appeared in more than forty roles in episodic television and film, and she was in the First National Broadway tour of Spring Awakening

Based in Los Angeles, she has played leading roles in regional theaters across the country, among them Arena Stage, the Public Theater in NYC, and the La Jolla Playhouse. Two of her short stories appear as part of Sister Writereaters, a book of essays about motherhood and food. katefuglei.com

Fuglei is the author of two Mentoris Project books: Fermi’s Gifts: A Novel Based on the Life of Enrico Fermi and The Soul of a Child: A Novel Based on the Life of Maria Montessori.

Follow @mentorisproject on Instagram

Visit the Mentoris Project for more!


Also from the Mentoris Project

 

Want to use these books in your classroom? Contact the Mentoris Project!`

The Mentoris Project Podcast: A.P. Giannini: The People’s Banker by Francesca Valente [Audio]

May 7th, 2019 Comments off

I am the technical producer on this podcast! — Douglas

Giannini Icon 3 28Valente+photo

The Mentoris Project Podcast: A.P. Giannini: The People’s Banker by Francesca Valente

Hosted by Dr. Rosanne Welch

Listen Now

Play

Today’s guest Francesca Valente, author of A.P. Giannini: The People’s Banker.

In spite of devastating personal obstacles, such as the death of his father, Giannini became the world’s leading banker of the twentieth century. Raised by hardworking peasant immigrants in what was considered a backwater area of California, Giannini received his economic education in an unconventional way, paving the way for his rise to prosperity.  

Founding the Bank of Italy for poor immigrant families, he wanted to overcome the barriers put in place by the conservative current banking elite to fulfill the dreams of “little guys.”  

Soon, the Bank of Italy became the Bank of America and the poor Italian was now in a position to help dreamers such as Walt Disney achieve their own dreams. Giannini also shaped the San Francisco skyline by financing the bold Golden Gate Bridge. His influences and hard work can be seen all over the country, simply because he believed in “a more general distribution of wealth and happiness.” 

About the Author

A journalist and a cultural mediator, Dr. Francesca Valente was director of several Italian Cultural Institutes (IIC) in North America for more than thirty years. In her most recent post in Los Angeles, she coordinated the eight IIC of USA and Canada. She produced several short films, edited over 100 catalogues and publications, and translated thirty-five works by such renowned authors as Margaret Atwood, Giorgio Bassani, Leonard Cohen, Northrop Frye, Marshall McLuhan, Michael Ondaatje, and Pier Paolo Pasolini. She has lectured at University of California at Berkeley; University of Southern California; LUISS University and La Sapienza, Rome.

Follow @mentorisproject on Instagram

Visit the Mentoris Project for more!


Also from the Mentoris Project

 

Want to use these books in your classroom? Contact the Mentoris Project!`

Categories: Audio, Books, History, Podcast, Show, Writing Tags: