Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format
Close

Archive

Archive for the ‘Audio’ Category

Listening To: BBC In Our Time: Albrecht Dürer [Podcast]

November 20th, 2020 No comments

What I'm Listening To: In Our Time: Albrecht Dürer [Podcast]

Albrecht Düre – BBC In Our Time

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the great German artist Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) who achieved fame throughout Europe for the power of his images. These range from his woodcut of a rhinoceros, to his watercolour of a young hare, to his drawing of praying hands and his stunning self-portraits such as that above (albeit here in a later monochrome reproduction) with his distinctive A D monogram. He was expected to follow his father and become a goldsmith, but found his own way to be a great artist, taking public commissions that built his reputation but did not pay, while creating a market for his prints, and he captured the timeless and the new in a world of great change.

With

Susan Foister
Deputy Director and Curator of German Paintings at the National Gallery

Giulia Bartrum
Freelance art historian and Former Curator of German Prints and Drawings at the British Museum

Ulinka Rublack
Professor of Early Modern European History and Fellow of St John’s College, University of Cambridge

Listen to this podcast

Links and Further Reading on the BBC Web Site

‎99% Invisible: 403- Return of the Yokai via Apple Podcasts

July 8th, 2020 Comments off
In the US, mascots are used to pump up crowds at sporting events, or for traumatizing generations of children at Chuck E. Cheese, but in Japan it’s different. There are mascots for towns, aquariums, dentists’ offices, even prisons. There are mascots in cities that tell people not to litter, or remind them to be quiet on the train. Everything has a mascot and anything can be a mascot. The reason why mascots and character culture flourish in Japan is connected with the nation’s fascinating history with mythical monsters known as Yokai.

800px Amaterasu cave crop 600x1151




An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎99% Invisible: 401- The Natural Experiment via Apple Podcasts [Audio]

May 26th, 2020 Comments off
99% Invisible: 401- The Natural Experiment via Apple Podcasts [Audio]
In general, the coronavirus shutdowns have been terrible for academic research. Trips have been canceled, labs have shut down, and long-running experiments have been interrupted. But there are some researchers for whom the shutdowns have provided a unique opportunity—a whole new data set, a chance to gather new information, or to look at information in a new way. And so, this week, we’re bringing you stories very different academic fields, about researchers who are using this bizarre, tragic moment to learn something new about the world.

‎Home School: The Boring Talks: #50 – Windows via Apple Podcasts [Audio]

May 11th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: The Boring Talks: #50 - Windows  via Apple Podcasts

Where does the word ‘Window’ derive from? And what does it have to do with a Norwegian architectural historian and a bohemian Austrian poet? On a lyrical journey from death to inspiration, Anne Ulrikke Andersen takes a look through the windows in the life of Christian Norberg-Schulz.

James Ward introduces another curious talk about a subject that may seem boring, but is actually very interesting…. maybe.

Listen To  The Boring Talks: #50 – Windows via Apple Podcasts


An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts

May 8th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts
Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts
 

They are either 12, 14 or 16 inches wide, they live just outside our doors, and they come in a variety of striking designs. So why has no one heard of coal holes?

Local historian Amir Dotan explores the streets of London to find the small metal discs you may not have noticed before, but may well have stepped over thousands of times.

James Ward introduces another curious talk about a subject that may seem boring, but is actually very interesting…. maybe.

 


An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Home School: The Boring Talks: #37 – Watergate Tape ‘Silence’ via Apple Podcasts

April 21st, 2020 Comments off
The Boring Talks: #37 - Watergate Tape 'Silence' on Apple Podcasts via Apple Podcasts

The neuroscientist Sophie Scott takes a close listen to the long ‘silent’ gap on the Watergate Tapes.

Buzz. Click. Buzz. Click. Buzz.

Presenter: James Ward
Contributor: Sophie Scott
Producer: Luke Doran

Listen To The Boring Talks: #37 – Watergate Tape ‘Silence’ via Apple Podcasts




An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Twenty Thousand Hertz: #80 I Virtual Choir on Apple Podcasts via Apple Podcasts

April 19th, 2020 Comments off
Twenty Thousand Hertz: #80 I Virtual Choir on Apple Podcasts via Apple Podcasts
Singing with others is a powerful form of expression. That’s why the composer Eric Whitacre started the Virtual Choir; an experiment that connects singers from every corner of the globe. In this episode, we hear how a choir can unite people from different backgrounds to achieve a common goal – creating beautiful music.

Headspace offers free guided meditations and workouts for New Yorkers via Mashable!

April 6th, 2020 Comments off
 

New York is the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, so Headspace is bringing a little bit of relief to the Empire State. 

Headspace announced a partnership with Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office to offer free guided meditations, sleep sounds, exercises, and mindfulness content for kids on a New York-specific webpage. In case you’re not aware, Headspace is a popular mindfulness mobile app that offers all of those things under normal circumstances, but usually charges a subscription fee to access everything.

“Now more than ever it’s critical that New Yorkers stay healthy both physically and mentally, and these resources will help people cope with rising levels of stress and anxiety during this unprecedented public health crisis,” Cuomo said in a statement.

The Internet Archive Is Digitizing & Preserving Over 100,000 Vinyl Records: Hear 750 Full Albums Now via Open Culture

March 30th, 2020 Comments off
 

There seems to be widespread agreement—something special was lost in the rushed-to-market move from physical media to digital streaming. We have come to admit that some older musical technologies cannot be improved upon. Musicians, producers, engineers spend thousands to replicate the sound of older analog recording technology, with all its quirky, inconsistent operation. And fans buy record players and vinyl records in surprisingly increasing numbers to hear the warm and fuzzy character of their sound.

Neil Young, who has relentlessly criticized every aspect of digital recording, has dismissed the resurgence of the LP as a “fashion statement” given that most new albums released on vinyl are digital masters. But buyers come to vinyl with a range of expectations, writes Ari Herstand at Digital Music News: “Vinyl is an entire experience. Wonderfully tactile…. When we stare at our screens for the majority of our days, it’s nice to look at art that doesn’t glow and isn’t the size of my hand.” Vinyl can feel and look as good as it sounds (when properly engineered).

FREE Audiobooks for kids (and adults) from Audible

March 20th, 2020 Comments off
No need to download or log in or anything. Click the book and start listening immediately! Maybe it’s time you finally read/listened to one of those classics, like Frankenstein, that you have always been meaning to read. — Douglas
 
For as long as schools are closed, we’re open. Starting today, kids everywhere can instantly stream an incredible collection of stories, including titles across six different languages, that will help them continue dreaming, learning, and just being kids.
Read Audible Stories | Audible.com via Audible.com


An interesting link found among my daily reading