Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format
Close

Archive

Archive for the ‘Audio’ Category

‎99% Invisible: 401- The Natural Experiment via Apple Podcasts [Audio]

May 26th, 2020 Comments off
99% Invisible: 401- The Natural Experiment via Apple Podcasts [Audio]
In general, the coronavirus shutdowns have been terrible for academic research. Trips have been canceled, labs have shut down, and long-running experiments have been interrupted. But there are some researchers for whom the shutdowns have provided a unique opportunity—a whole new data set, a chance to gather new information, or to look at information in a new way. And so, this week, we’re bringing you stories very different academic fields, about researchers who are using this bizarre, tragic moment to learn something new about the world.

‎Home School: The Boring Talks: #50 – Windows via Apple Podcasts [Audio]

May 11th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: The Boring Talks: #50 - Windows  via Apple Podcasts

Where does the word ‘Window’ derive from? And what does it have to do with a Norwegian architectural historian and a bohemian Austrian poet? On a lyrical journey from death to inspiration, Anne Ulrikke Andersen takes a look through the windows in the life of Christian Norberg-Schulz.

James Ward introduces another curious talk about a subject that may seem boring, but is actually very interesting…. maybe.

Listen To  The Boring Talks: #50 – Windows via Apple Podcasts


An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts

May 8th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts
Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts
 

They are either 12, 14 or 16 inches wide, they live just outside our doors, and they come in a variety of striking designs. So why has no one heard of coal holes?

Local historian Amir Dotan explores the streets of London to find the small metal discs you may not have noticed before, but may well have stepped over thousands of times.

James Ward introduces another curious talk about a subject that may seem boring, but is actually very interesting…. maybe.

 


An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Home School: The Boring Talks: #37 – Watergate Tape ‘Silence’ via Apple Podcasts

April 21st, 2020 Comments off
The Boring Talks: #37 - Watergate Tape 'Silence' on Apple Podcasts via Apple Podcasts

The neuroscientist Sophie Scott takes a close listen to the long ‘silent’ gap on the Watergate Tapes.

Buzz. Click. Buzz. Click. Buzz.

Presenter: James Ward
Contributor: Sophie Scott
Producer: Luke Doran

Listen To The Boring Talks: #37 – Watergate Tape ‘Silence’ via Apple Podcasts




An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Twenty Thousand Hertz: #80 I Virtual Choir on Apple Podcasts via Apple Podcasts

April 19th, 2020 Comments off
Twenty Thousand Hertz: #80 I Virtual Choir on Apple Podcasts via Apple Podcasts
Singing with others is a powerful form of expression. That’s why the composer Eric Whitacre started the Virtual Choir; an experiment that connects singers from every corner of the globe. In this episode, we hear how a choir can unite people from different backgrounds to achieve a common goal – creating beautiful music.

Headspace offers free guided meditations and workouts for New Yorkers via Mashable!

April 6th, 2020 Comments off
 

New York is the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, so Headspace is bringing a little bit of relief to the Empire State. 

Headspace announced a partnership with Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office to offer free guided meditations, sleep sounds, exercises, and mindfulness content for kids on a New York-specific webpage. In case you’re not aware, Headspace is a popular mindfulness mobile app that offers all of those things under normal circumstances, but usually charges a subscription fee to access everything.

“Now more than ever it’s critical that New Yorkers stay healthy both physically and mentally, and these resources will help people cope with rising levels of stress and anxiety during this unprecedented public health crisis,” Cuomo said in a statement.

The Internet Archive Is Digitizing & Preserving Over 100,000 Vinyl Records: Hear 750 Full Albums Now via Open Culture

March 30th, 2020 Comments off
 

There seems to be widespread agreement—something special was lost in the rushed-to-market move from physical media to digital streaming. We have come to admit that some older musical technologies cannot be improved upon. Musicians, producers, engineers spend thousands to replicate the sound of older analog recording technology, with all its quirky, inconsistent operation. And fans buy record players and vinyl records in surprisingly increasing numbers to hear the warm and fuzzy character of their sound.

Neil Young, who has relentlessly criticized every aspect of digital recording, has dismissed the resurgence of the LP as a “fashion statement” given that most new albums released on vinyl are digital masters. But buyers come to vinyl with a range of expectations, writes Ari Herstand at Digital Music News: “Vinyl is an entire experience. Wonderfully tactile…. When we stare at our screens for the majority of our days, it’s nice to look at art that doesn’t glow and isn’t the size of my hand.” Vinyl can feel and look as good as it sounds (when properly engineered).

FREE Audiobooks for kids (and adults) from Audible

March 20th, 2020 Comments off
No need to download or log in or anything. Click the book and start listening immediately! Maybe it’s time you finally read/listened to one of those classics, like Frankenstein, that you have always been meaning to read. — Douglas
 
For as long as schools are closed, we’re open. Starting today, kids everywhere can instantly stream an incredible collection of stories, including titles across six different languages, that will help them continue dreaming, learning, and just being kids.
Read Audible Stories | Audible.com via Audible.com


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Christmas Past – 13 in a series – Hark! the Herald Angels Sing by Trinity Choir (1911)

December 13th, 2019 Comments off

Christmas Past – 13 in a series – Hark! the Herald Angels Sing by Trinity Choir (1911)

Christmas Past - 13in a series - Hark! the Herald Angels Sing by Trinity Choir (1911)

Christmas Hymn; Mixed Voices with orchestra.

Digitized at 78 revolutions per minute. Four stylii were used to transfer this record. They are 3.8mil truncated conical, 2.3mil truncated conical, 2.8mil truncated conical, 3.3mil truncated conical.

Download and Listen to more on Archive.org



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Audio, Christmas, History, Music Tags:

Christmas Past – 4 in a series – A Christmas Carol (1947), Performed by Lionel Barrymore; Richard Hale [Audio]

December 4th, 2019 Comments off

Christmas Past – 4 in a series – A Christmas Carol (1947), Performed by Lionel Barrymore; Richard Hale

Christmas Past - 4 in a series - A Christmas Carol (1947), Performed by Lionel Barrymore; Richard Hale [Audio]

Play and Download This Recording  from the Internet Archive

“Of all the roles I’ve done, the one I’d like best to be remembered for is Scrooge. It is unquestionably one of my favorites.” Lionel Barrymore, Dec. 21, 1947. The New York Times. (Interview with Dorothy O’Leary).

When MGM Records released A Christmas Carol in 1947, Lionel Barrymore had been playing Ebenezer Scrooge for twelve years on the radio. Starting in 1934, CBS presented the Charles Dickens’ classic story each year and it soon became a much loved Christmas tradition. Barrymore, in his radio debut, embodied Scrooge to perfection. As he  revealed in a 1947  New York Times interview, “I seem to shrink and an unnatural meanness of disposition comes over me. I seem to be Scrooge in body and mind.”

Barrymore went on to play the role 17 times before his death in November, 1954, and only the direst of circumstances prevented him from playing it. When his wife died in 1936 he was unable to perform, and his brother John rushed to fill in for him. He also missed the performance of 1938 when serious illness forced Orson Welles to substitute. — Library of Congress