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Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

‎99% Invisible: 403- Return of the Yokai via Apple Podcasts

July 8th, 2020 No comments
In the US, mascots are used to pump up crowds at sporting events, or for traumatizing generations of children at Chuck E. Cheese, but in Japan it’s different. There are mascots for towns, aquariums, dentists’ offices, even prisons. There are mascots in cities that tell people not to litter, or remind them to be quiet on the train. Everything has a mascot and anything can be a mascot. The reason why mascots and character culture flourish in Japan is connected with the nation’s fascinating history with mythical monsters known as Yokai.

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Home School: Did Ancient Rome and China Know About Each Other? via History Matters on YouTube [Video]

July 1st, 2020 No comments

Historical Cooking Books – 58 in a series – Perfection in baking (1900) by Emil Braun

June 28th, 2020 No comments

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 58 in a series – Perfection in baking (1900) by Emil Braun

Historical Cooking Books - 58 in a series - Perfection in baking (1900) by Emil Braun

Perfectioninbaki03brau 0021

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PREFACE.

IN no other land has the baking and consumption of bake-stuffs grown to such an extent as it has within the past few years in this country. Even in the household of the most humble workman, as in the mansion of the rich and prosperous merchant, the American cook and housewife is generally more praised and esteemed for her good bread, pastry and desserts, than for meat cooking. In looking over the numerous cook books that are now placed so freely before the public, the inexperienced can find no way of learning how or why the recipes read as they do. Before any success in baking can be expected, the cook, baker or housewife must be educated to all the particulars of the materials they are about to use.

It is the main object of this work to show in plain language all who are interested how to become successful in baking; the theories of how to put together and how to change recipes, when the same grades or brands of materials are not on hand. Judgment and common sense must be displayed to insure success. Did you ever hear a woman say, “I had good luck to-day with my cakes,” but alas, the next time, “Oh, I had such bad luck with my baking”? There it is; one day good luck, the next time ashamed to show the result of her labor, and all the good materials wasted. It is the lack of theoretical knowledge about baking that brings the bad luck, and many a professional baker is not able to explain the real cause of the mishap. The theories herein laid out plainly before the reader are all the result of careful, practical experiments, and are based upon accomplished facts. Being confident of the success of my efforts in demonstrating some new and practical points to all interested in baking, and wishing to prepare delicious desserts, I shall herewith give my recipes in several parts, each part treating upon a different branch in the art of baking.

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Publication date 1900
Topics BakingCookerycbk
Publisher New York, J. S. Ogilvie publishing company
Collection library_of_congressamericana
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Contributor The Library of Congress
Language English


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

How a Former Rocket Scientist Makes the Best Copper Pots in America — Handmade via Eater on YouTube

June 24th, 2020 Comments off
Rocket scientist-turned-coppersmith Jim Hamann’s devotion to cookware came from a beautiful vintage pot he found on a trip to France. After starting a business restoring copper pots and pans for others, he decided to begin handcrafting his own, honoring the methods and quality of the centuries-old tradition at his company Duparquet Copper Cookware.
Watch How a Former Rocket Scientist Makes the Best Copper Pots in America — Handmade via Eater on YouTube




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Historical Cooking Books – 57 in a series – Sponge cakes (1928) by United States. Department of Agriculture. Radio Service; United States. Bureau of Home Economics

June 21st, 2020 Comments off

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 57 in a series – Sponge cakes (1928) by United States. Department of Agriculture. Radio Service; United States. Bureau of Home Economics

Historical Cooking Books - 57 in a series - Sponge cakes (1928) by United States. Department of Agriculture. Radio Service; United States. Bureau of Home Economics

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

 

Last night I had a telephone call from a young housewife who wanted to know how to make a sponge cake. She said she had never yet made a sponge cake which was anything but a flat and dismal failure.In order to please this young woman, I promised to give a little lecture today entitled “Sponge Cakes, and How to Make Them.” Perhaps other homekeepers will be interested in my directions, for surely a light and delicate sponge cake is worth striving for.

 

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Publication date 1928
Topics Formulas, recipes, etcCakeBaking
Publisher [Washington, D.C.] : United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Information, Radio Service
Collection usda-housekeeperschatusdanationalagriculturallibraryfedlinkamericana
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1928


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Categories: Baking, Books, Canada, Cooking, Education, Food, History, Home, Recipe Tags:

Home School: The Romanian Revolution: Explained via History Matters on YouTube

June 15th, 2020 Comments off
I love learning about history I haven’t been exposed to before. These short videos fill in blank spots in my knowledge and help knit together the story of the past. — Douglas
 
In 1989, a wave of revolution swept across Eastern Europe, disrupting the Communist governments of Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary and of course, Romania. But how did the Romanian Revolution play out and why couldn’t Nicolae Ceaușescu or the authorities stop it like they had done previously? And why did it end the way it did? With the same people still in power and the Ceaușescu’s subject to a mock trial.
Watch The Romanian Revolution: Explained via History Matters on YouTube


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Historical Cooking Books – 56 in a series – The Maple Leaf Canadian Recipe Book By Kathleen K. Bowker

June 14th, 2020 Comments off

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 56 in a series – The Maple Leaf Canadian Recipe Book By Kathleen K. Bowker

 Historical Cooking Books - 56 in a series - The Maple Leaf Canadian Recipe Book By Kathleen K. Bowker

Historical Cooking Books - 56 in a series - The Maple Leaf Canadian Recipe Book By Kathleen K. Bowker

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MESSAGE TO BRITISH HOUSEWIVES

By The

HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR CANADA Canada House, London, S.W. 1

THIS little book contains recipes for a number of delectable dishes that can be prepared easily and quickly from preserved or packaged foods and is intended to provide several more links in the chain of distribution between the Canadian producer and the consumer.

The book tells you something of which Canadians are justly very proud: that no other country produces food under more hygienically perfect conditions. The same standards are maintained in our home and export markets: the former because the health of the people is a paramount concern; the latter because we jealously guard our good name.

The principal Canadian pure food products which the recipes cover are dealt with under separate headings and you are asked not only to use them but to give them a fair trial by preparing them in the most appetizing manner. They are good, wholesome, and delicious: each in its own class as near perfection as can be attained. You are urged to buy them because they are good, and not simply because they are Canadian. All things being equal, you are requested to give a logical preference to the Canadian product over the foreign.

The recipes given are quite comprehensive within the field that the book covers, and it is felt that they will prove extremely useful.

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Topic Formulas, recipes, etc
Published London : High Commissioner for Canada
Collection queens_universitytoronto
Digitizing sponsor Queen’s University – University of Toronto Libraries
Contributor Queen’s University Library, W.D. Jordan Special Collections and Music Library
Language English


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

How to Create a Photogram Effect with a Digital Process via Digital Photography School

June 13th, 2020 Comments off
One of the first photographic processes I learned was how to make a photogram. Since then, I’ve often wondered if a digital process could adequately mimic the appearance of the finished photogram aesthetic. The difference between the original and digital processes means that the results of any digital technique can’t really be called a photogram as such (I’ll call it a photogram effect). Nevertheless, there are digital processes that do hearken back to the appearance of the photogram.
Read How to Create a Photogram Effect with a Digital Process via Digital Photography School


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Home School: Film Adaptations of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol via Gresham College on YouTube

June 9th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: Film Adaptations of Dickens' A Christmas Carol via Gresham College on YouTube

How do the different film versions of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol reflect the politics and culture of their own particular times?

A lecture by Dr Christine L. Corton, Wolfson College Cambridge
10 December 2019 6PM GMT

A Christmas Carol (1843) is the most filmed and televised of Dickens’ works. Many will warmly remember the 1951 Alastair Sim version, but how many are aware of A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), a propaganda film produced in support of the UN, or The Passions of Carol (1975), which attempted to highlight the evil of the pornographic industry? How do the different versions reflect the politics and culture of their own particular times? What makes a good Carol movie? Is it truth to the original or is it something else?

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A Christmas Carol: With Original Illustrations In Full Color
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NASA Shows California Poppies in Bloom with Photo Captured from Space via My Modern Met

June 8th, 2020 Comments off
NASA Shows California Poppies in Bloom with Photo Captured from Space via My Modern Met

 

Each spring, California’s Antelope Valley explodes with color as vast quantities of flowers bloom. While there are several types of wildflowers in the mix, it’s the state flower—the California poppy—that is the star of the show. Typically visitors flock to the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve to take in the breathtaking scene, but this year is proving a bit different.

With the reserve temporarily closed due to COVID-19 measures, in-person poppy watching isn’t possible. But thanks to NASA, we’re able to have a whole different perspective on the event. As the poppy fields are located close to NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, it’s only fitting that a land imager aboard the Landsat 8 satellite captured the superbloom at its peak.