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Etna Erupts, August 12, 2011 via Instagram

September 19th, 2020 No comments

Etna Erupts, August 12, 2011

Etna Erupts, August 12, 2011 via Instagram

The view from my window at the family home in Mascalucia, Sicily. Imagine this outside your window each morning.

 

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Duomo di Milano in Watercolor via Instagram

August 20th, 2020 Comments off

Free to Use and Reuse: Historical Travel Pictures  | Free to Use and Reuse Sets via The Library of Congress

August 15th, 2020 Comments off
Free to Use and Reuse: Historical Travel Pictures  | Free to Use and Reuse Sets via The Library of Congress
Take a century-old “grand tour” of the world in these historical travel images. This set is just a teaser from the stunning Photochrom Prints Collection. This collection features, in color, Europe, the Middle East, Canada, Asia and the South Pacific as they appeared in the 1890s and early 1900s. Browse more content that is free to use and reuse.

Home School: The History of the World in Four Maps via Google Maps Mania

August 11th, 2020 Comments off
The History of the World in Four Maps via Google Maps Mania

The animated map above shows the changing borders of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa during the Twentieth Century. It is a a pretty good illustration of how geo-political developments demand frequently updated maps.

I created this animated map using Mundipedia. Munipedia is an interactive map which shows country borders for different dates in history. Enter a date into Munipedia and you can view how the world looked in that year. For example enter the year 1984 and you will see a divided Germany, split into East and West Germany. Skip forward a few years and in 1990 the map shows just the one Germany.

Read The History of the World in Four Maps via Google Maps Mania




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Recently Purchased: Temple of Castor and Pollux Stickers and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

August 8th, 2020 Comments off

Recently Purchased: Temple of Castor and Pollux Stickers and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

I took over 200 photos as we walked around the Valley with our Sicilian relatives. The sun was blazing but we soaked in the history of the site through these remains from antiquity. It is difficult to truly understand that Greek speaking people walked, played, ate and worshiped at this site so many years before. You almost have to remind yourself that this isn’t some movie set made for your entertainment, but rather the survivors of humans long history on the planet. — Douglas

Recently Purchased: Temple of Castor and Pollux Stickers and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

Available exclusively from
DouglasEWelch.com/shop/222

Also available on throw blankets, pillows, tops, tees, iPhone cases and much more!

*Redbubble has discounts when purchasing multiple items and also gives 10%-20% discounts on a regular basis. Check back often!


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Home School: Archeologists Unearth Ancient Roman Mosaic Under a Vineyard via My Modern Met

June 7th, 2020 Comments off
Archeologists Unearth Ancient Roman Mosaic Under a Vineyard via My Modern Met

Thanks to Italy’s rich history, if you dig a little bit you’re sure to find something special—even in unexpected places. This was made clear in Verona, where the city has been excavating a privately owned vineyard since the fall. And now, their hard work has paid off as archaeologists have uncovered a pristine mosaic floor dating back to the 1st century CE.

It’s an incredible find in an area that’s long been recognized to house treasures from ancient Rome. In fact, according to local sources, the land was known to sit on top of Roman artifacts since at 19th century. Some mosaics, which are on display in a city museum, were already excavated from the site in the 1960s.

Read Archeologists Unearth Ancient Roman Mosaic Under a Vineyard via My Modern Met




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Enjoy The Glow From These Nighttime Neon Tees and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

May 23rd, 2020 Comments off

Get Lost in the Stacks of These Stunning Libraries You Can Virtually Tour via House Beautiful

May 9th, 2020 Comments off
Get Lost in the Stacks of These Stunning Libraries You Can Virtually Tour
There’s nothing better than getting lost in a stack of books—bonus if it’s amidst impressive architecture. Given that it’s currently National Library Week, there is no better time to visit (albeit virtually) some of the most impressive libraries in the world. Below, House Beautiful has rounded up a list of virtual tours of libraries in places like England, Austria, New York, Massachusetts, Mexico, Portugal, and Prague, and we cannot wait to bask in the joy that these magnificent libraries have to offer. Happy library hopping, bibliophiles!
 

 
Read about our own LA Public Library
 
The Library Book
Susan Orlean (Author)

An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts

May 8th, 2020 Comments off
Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts
Home School: Coal Holes from The Boring Talks via Apple Podcasts
 

They are either 12, 14 or 16 inches wide, they live just outside our doors, and they come in a variety of striking designs. So why has no one heard of coal holes?

Local historian Amir Dotan explores the streets of London to find the small metal discs you may not have noticed before, but may well have stepped over thousands of times.

James Ward introduces another curious talk about a subject that may seem boring, but is actually very interesting…. maybe.

 


An interesting link found among my daily reading

100 Years of Designing for U.S. National Parks via CityLab

February 23rd, 2020 Comments off
From the beginning, the history of America’s national parks has been indelibly linked to images. In the 1870s, Thomas Moran painted dramatic views of Yellowstone, prompting Congress to make it the country’s first national park; some 50 years later, Ansel Adams’s photos of Kings Canyon, California, led to the protection of that remote region of the Sierra Nevada. Since then, park maps and brochures have become essential in more quotidian ways—helping visitors navigate the premises, providing valuable safety information, and serving as beloved souvenirs.