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Historical Cooking Books – 90 in a series – Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821)

February 28th, 2021 No comments

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Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery, with concise instructions for preparing good and wholesome pickles, vinegar, conserves, fruit jellies, marmalades, and various other alimentary substances employed in domestic economy, with observations on the chemical constitution and nutritive qualities of different kinds of food. With copper plates by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821)

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821) Cover

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821) Preface

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821) Plate showing kitchen tools

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PREFACE. LONDON, COMPTON STREET, SOHO.

The following pages are intended to exhibit a popular view of the philosophy of cookery, to enable the reader to understand the chemical principles, by means of which alimentary substances are rendered palatable and nutritious. The subject may appear frivolous ; but let it be remembered that it is by the application of the principles of philosophy to the ordinary affairs of life, that science diffuses her benefits, and perfects her claim to the gratitude of mankind.

The art of preparing good and wholesome food is, undoubtedly, a branch of chemistry $ the kitchen is a chemical laboratory ; all the processes employed for rendering alimentary substances fit for human sustenance, are chemical processes ; and much waste of the materials, as well as labour to the parties, might often be spared, were those who practise this art, made acquainted with some simple chemical truths which invariably would lead to certain results. I have, in the first place, premised, as introductory to what follows, some general observations on the various kinds of alimentary substances commonly used for food ; in which I haye noticed their chemical constitution, and comparative nutritive qualities. After these preliminary statements, I have proceeded to explain the summary processes of the culinary art, as practised in the English kitchen, to render obvious the chemical effects produced by the operations of roasting, boiling, stewing, broiling, frywing, and other means employed for dressing food.

I have given concise, but accurate directions for preparing good and wholesome pickles, and other condiments employed in domestic economy.

I have pointed out the rules to be attended to in the art of con serving recent fruits, and other vegetable substances, in the state of what are called preserves, marmalades, fruit jams, and jellies, to enable the reader to prepare those kinds of comfitures with economy and success.

I have given concise directions for preserving butcher’s meat, fish, and fowl, after being cooked, to render them fit for sea store, or domestic use, at a future time.

I have stated the most approved processes for curing bacon, hams, smoked beef, and salted fish T to which I have added instructions for the choice of butcher’s meat, and the best methods of constructing pantries, larders, and meat safes.

I have pointed out the loss of weight which different kinds of meat suffers in the usual operations of cooking.

I have described the most approved methods for preserving recently gathered fruits in their natural state, as nearly as possible, with directions for constructing fruit rooms, and the circumstances to be attended to u storing esculent roots and other vegetables*

I have animadverted on certain material errors, sometimes committed through ignorance or negligence, in the preparation of food, and various delicacies of the table ; and I have also given hints that will be found useful, with regard to the practice of making tea and coffee. And lastly, I have made some remarks on the construction of kitchen fire-places, to which I have added designs, exhibiting the most approved cooking apparatus, calculated for the use of private families or public establishments. In resuming the whole, I have endeavoured (and I hope with some degree of success,) to communicate to those to whom the superintendance of a family is entrusted, such useful culinary information as may lead to beneficial consequences.

FREDRICK ACCUM. 1821.

 

 

PEACH MARMALADE.

Peel the peaches and take out the stones, simmer them till half done, then drain them, reduce them to a pulp, and squeeze the mass through a coarse splinter sieve. Weigh the pulp, and to every pound add twelve ounces of powdered loaf sugar; simmer the mass till it has acquired a stiff pasty consistence.

 

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Publication date 1821
Topics CookingFood
Publisher London : published by R. Ackermann
Collection leedsuniversitylibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 89 in a series – Official hand-book and guide by Bartenders’ Association of New York City (1895)

February 21st, 2021 No comments

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Historical Cooking Books – 89 in a series – Official hand-book and guide by Bartenders’ Association of New York City (1895)

Historical Cooking Books - 89 in a series - Official hand-book and guide by Bartenders' Association of New York City (1895) cover

Historical Cooking Books - 89 in a series - Official hand-book and guide by Bartenders' Association of New York City (1895)

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Important to Bartenders.

The large and constantly increasing popularity of Mixed Drinks makes it advisable to place before the members of this Association, in clear and concise form, the best and newest recipes in use.

In order that the members might have the benefit of the experience, not of one or two, but of all the leading saloons, cafes, restaurants and clubs of this city, we have spent much time and labor in collecting, in this Guide,, all information of value bearing on this important subject.

Of all those who have profited by similar information obtained through our Association, many have derived very gratifying results and a decided gain in their business from the time of adopting our suggestions.

If the within instructions are strictly adhered to, success will necessarily follow. The American people will have the best, and you can be successful only by giving them the best. It is hardly necessary to state that, of ail mixed drinks, none are so universally popular as the cocktails. Be sure to use the best material and go strictly according to instructions contained in the Guide.

Phil’a Boating Punch.
(Use large bar glass. )

2 dashes of lemon juice
2 dashes of lime juice.
Water to dissolve the above.
Fill the glass with fine ice.
1 wine glass of St. Croix rum
1 pony of brandy.

Mix well

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Publication date 1895
Topics CocktailsBartending
Publisher [New York : Bartenders’ Association of New York City]
Collection durstoldyorklibraryColumbiaUniversityLibrariesamericana
Digitizing sponsor The Durst Organization
Contributor Columbia University Libraries
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 88 in a series – The Inglenook cook book (1911)

February 14th, 2021 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 88 in a series – The Inglenook cook book (1911)

Historical Cooking Books - 88 in a series - The Inglenook cook book (1911)

Historical Cooking Books - 88 in a series - The Inglenook cook book (1911) Preface

Historical Cooking Books - 88 in a series - The Inglenook cook book (1911) Recipes

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Family Apple Pie. — Make dough the same as for other pies, using about 1 pint of sweet milk for a good-sized pie. Have ready 3 quarts of thinly-sliced baking apples. Line a bread pan with the dough and fill half full of the apples. Sprinkle it with sugar enough to sweeten to suit the taste ; then put in a thin layer of the dough and finish filling to the top with the apples and sweeten, after which place on the cover and bake an hour. Serve warm with sweetened cream or fresh butter. — Sister Alary J. Huffman, Churchville, Va.

Banana Pie. — Bake a crust ; let it cool ; slice 2 bananas into the crust. Boil 1 cupful of milk, y 2 cup of sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, and 2 tablespoonfuls of flour until thick. Let it cool and then pour over the bananas. Beat the whites of egg-s and spread over the top. Put in a quick oven to brown, but do not let pie get hot through. — Sister F. J. Weimer, Greenville, Ohio.
Bob Andy Pie. — Take }i cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls of flour and mix together with the yolks of 3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of cloves and 1 tablespoonful of cinnamon. Beat and add whites of eggs. Then add 3 small cups of milk. Bake like pumpkin pie. This will make two pies. — Sister Laura Gibson, Vir- den, III.

Boston Pie. — Take 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, 1 / 2 cup of sour cream, 1 / 2 cup of sweet milk, 2 cups of flour, 1 small teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk, and 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar sifted in the flour. Bake in 2 jelly pans. When done, as soon as cool, split with a sharp knife, and spread with a custard made as follows : Take 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 large tablespoonful of corn- ^ starch, 1 egg, sweeten well, and a pinch of salt. For the top take 1 square of chocolate, 6 tablespoonfuls of sugar, and 2 tablespoonfuls of sweet cream ; melt gently over boiling water. When it comes to a boil, remove from the fire and beat until cool. This will make 2 pies. — Sister Jas. M. Rozdand, Hagerstoivn, Md

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Publication date 1911
Topics Cooking, American
Publisher Elgin, Ill., Brethren Pub. House
Collection library_of_congressamericana
Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress
Contributor The Library of Congress
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 87 in a series – 365 Breakfast Dishes: A Breakfast Dish For Every Day In The Year (1906)

February 8th, 2021 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 87 in a series – 365 Breakfast Dishes: A Breakfast Dish For Every Day In The Year (1906)

Historical Cooking Books - 87 in a series - 365 Breakfast Dishes: A Breakfast Dish For Every Day In The Year (1906)

Historical Cooking Books - 87 in a series - 365 Breakfast Dishes: A Breakfast Dish For Every Day In The Year (1906)

Historical Cooking Books - 87 in a series - 365 Breakfast Dishes: A Breakfast Dish For Every Day In The Year (1906)

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FEBRUARY, .
1. — Eggs in Boxes.

Cut slices of bread 1 1/2 inches thick; trim them off neatly and scoop out the centre to make a box. Dip them in beaten egg and fry them in hot fat until a light brown. Drain on brown paper. Into each of these boxes drop an egg, dust lightly with salt and cook them in the oven for 2 or 3 minutes.

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Publication date 1906
Topics CookingBreakfasts
Publisher London : Dean & Son
Collection leedsuniversitylibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 86 in a series – Breakfast, Luncheon, And Tea (1875) by Marion Harland

January 31st, 2021 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 86 in a series – Breakfast, Luncheon, And Tea (1875) by Marion Harland

Historical Cooking Books - 86 in a series - Breakfast, Luncheon, And Tea (1875) by Marion Harland

Historical Cooking Books - 86 in a series - Breakfast, Luncheon, And Tea (1875) by Marion Harland

Historical Cooking Books - 86 in a series - Breakfast, Luncheon, And Tea (1875) by Marion Harland

Historical Cooking Books - 86 in a series - Breakfast, Luncheon, And Tea (1875) by Marion Harland

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BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON, AND TEA

FAMILIAR TALK WITH THE READER.

I SHOULD be indeed flattered could I believe that you hail with as much pleasure as I do the renewal of the “Common-Sense Talks,” to which I first invited you four years ago. For I have much to say to you in the same free-masonic, free-and-easy strain in which you indulged me then.

It is a wild March night. Winter and Summer, Spring- time and Autumn, the wind sings, or plains at my sitting- room window. To-night its shout is less fierce than jocund to my ear, for it says, between the castanet passages of hail and sleet, that neither friend nor bore will interrupt our conference. Shutters and curtains are closed ; the room is still, bright, and warm, and we are no longer strangers. The poorest man of my acquaintance counts his money by the million, has a superb mansion he calls “ home,” a wife and beautiful children who call him “ husband ” and “ father.” He has friends by the score, and admirers by the hundred, for human nature has not abated one jot in pru- dential sycophancy since the Psalmist summed up a volume of satirical truth in the pretended “ aside ” — “ and men will praise thee when thou doest well unto thyself.” For all that, he of whom I write is a pauper, inasmuch as he makes his boast that he never experienced the emotion of gratitude. He has worked his own way in the world, he is wont to say : has never had helping hand from mortal man or woman. It is a part of his religion to pay for all he gets, and never to ask a favor.

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Publication date 1875
Topics Cooking, EnglishBreakfastsLuncheons
Publisher London : George Routledge and Sons
Collection leedsuniversitylibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 84 in a series – 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

January 17th, 2021 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 84 in a series – 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Historical Cooking Books - 84 in a series - 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Historical Cooking Books - 84 in a series - 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Historical Cooking Books - 84 in a series - 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

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HOME BAKING SIMPLIFIED.

Eiffel Tower Bun Flour is a real help to the housewife, to the experienced cook, or to the expert chef. From the making of the plainest buns, cakes, or pastry for the most modest household to the making of the richest varieties for the banquet it is invaluable and equally successful.

Eiffel Tower Bun Flour is entirely distinct from any other preparation. There is an ease and certainty in its use which has made it famous among lovers of dainty buns, digestible home¬ made cakes, and light pastry. Try a packet at once.

Home-made buns, cakes and pastries made with Eiffel Tower Bun Flour have a daintiness and sweetness which is quite distinct from those made any other way.

Sold in 1d. and 31/2d. pkts. Lemon, Almond, Vanilla and Plain.

NOTICE.“Every Recipe in this Book is Good.

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Publication date 1880
Topics CookingFlourFood IndustryAdvertising as TopicGreat Britain
Publisher [Place of publication not identified] : [publisher not identified]
Collection wellcomelibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Wellcome Library
Contributor Wellcome Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 83 in a series – Fruits and their cookery (1921) by Harriet Schuyler Nelson

January 11th, 2021 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 83 in a series – Fruits and their cookery (1921) by Harriet Schuyler Nelson

Historical Cooking Books - 83 in a series - Fruits and their cookery (1921) by Harriet Schuyler Nelson

Historical Cooking Books - 83 in a series - Fruits and their cookery (1921) by Harriet Schuyler Nelson

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Publication date 1921
Topics Cookery (Fruit)Dessertscbk
Publisher New York : E.P. Dutton & company
Collection bostonpubliclibraryamericana
Digitizing sponsor Boston Public Library
Contributor Boston Public Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 82 in a series – For Danish appetites : cook book (19??) by Lyla G. Solum

January 3rd, 2021 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 82 in a series – For Danish appetites : cook book (19??) by Lyla G. Solum

Historical Cooking Books - 82 in a series - For Danish appetites : cook book (19??) by Lyla G. Solum

Historical Cooking Books - 82 in a series - For Danish appetites : cook book (19??) by Lyla G. Solum

Historical Cooking Books - 82 in a series - For Danish appetites : cook book (19??) by Lyla G. Solum

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The recipes in this book have been collected over a period of years by the writer. All of them are dear to the heart of a Danish immigrant who brought this little bit of her homeland with her to the new country and all of them were do- nated to this book as somethings precious from the giver.

LYLA G. SOLUM

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Publication date [19–?]
Topics Cookery, Danish
Publisher Sovang, Calif. : Danish Village Gifts
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Contributor University of California Libraries
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 81 in a series – Dr. Price’s Delicious Desserts : Containing Practical Recipes Carefully Selected And Tested : Excellent, Simple, Delicate (1904)

December 27th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 81 in a series – Dr. Price’s Delicious Desserts : Containing Practical Recipes Carefully Selected And Tested : Excellent, Simple, Delicate (1904)

Historical Cooking Books - 81 in a series - Dr. Price's Delicious Desserts : Containing Practical Recipes Carefully Selected And Tested : Excellent, Simple, Delicate (1904)

Historical Cooking Books - 81 in a series - Dr. Price's Delicious Desserts : Containing Practical Recipes Carefully Selected And Tested : Excellent, Simple, Delicate (1904)

Historical Cooking Books - 81 in a series - Dr. Price's Delicious Desserts : Containing Practical Recipes Carefully Selected And Tested : Excellent, Simple, Delicate (1904)

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Dr. Price’s Extracts have been in use for nearly half a century. They have acquired a world-wide popularity, due entirely to the care exercised in their manufacture, every stage of which is under the supervision of an experienced chemist. The aroma of every flavor is developed to its full extent by a process known only to ourselves. Their high degree of strength makes them unexcelled for economical cookery. The fruits from which they are made are selected with care, and all objectionable substances removed. Chemical com- pounds, natural to all fruits, which disguise the true flavor, are eliminated by our process, thus producing an extract many times stronger, more durable and delicious than any other in the market. In consequence of the high degree of purity attained, Dr. Price’s Delicious Flavoring Extracts can be carried in stock indefinitely without any loss of strength or change in flavor. Their freedom from ethers, poisonous oils, coal-tar substances, and artificial coloring removes all danger from chemical reaction, assuring their healthfulness and wholesomeness

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Publication date c1904
Topics CookeryBakingFlavoring essencesDesserts
Publisher Chicago : Price Flavoring Extract Co.
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor msn
Contributor University of California Libraries
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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Historical Cooking Books – 80 in a series – The Italian confectioner (1823)

December 20th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 80 in a series – The Italian confectioner (1823)

Historical Cooking Books - 80 in a series - The Italian confectioner (1823)

Historical Cooking Books - 80 in a series - The Italian confectioner (1823)

Historical Cooking Books - 80 in a series - The Italian confectioner (1823)

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PREFACE.

The art of the Confectioner, in common with almost every other art, has been greatly improved by the aid of modern chemistry ; the events of the French Revo- lution, also, which deprived many ingenious men of their situations in noble families, and compelled them to seek a subsistence by laying before the public the secrets of Confectionery, have done much towards the perfection of this agreeable art. The Confectioner is not without books which pre- tend to teach the principles of his profession ; but these are, in general, more applicable to the theory than the practice of Confectionery, and most of them are very imperfect ; some recent publications being totally silent on matters of the first importance.

No. 11 . — A Caramel . It breaks, as just observed, making a noise, like glass. When the Sugar is at the crack , add to it five or six drops of lemon juice to prevent its graining. When boiled, take it from the fire and put the bottom of the pan into cold water to prevent its burning. The production of caramel is attended with some difficulty, and great attention is necessary. As we can see in a moment the colour of caramel we wish to obtain, we must use the lemon juice cautiously, as too large a quantity would spoil the sugar. If no lemon juice be at hand, a few drops of vinegar, honoy. or butter — any acid or grease will smooth the sugar, which is naturally disposed to grain. As the sugar has no longer any moisture, it requires a strong fire, but this must be applied to the body of the sugar only ; for, if the fire be too fierce, it will burn the sugar to the sides of the pan, which will completely spoil it. The edges of the pan must be kept clean with a smalL sponge.

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Publication date 1823
Topics DessertsConfectionery
Publisher London : sold by John Harding; and by the author
Collection leedsuniversitylibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!