Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format
Close

Archive

Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup – 5 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch [Video]

July 4th, 2016 Comments off

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup – 5 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch 

This Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) has become an almost daily visitor to the garden in the last few weeks, so I’ll be sharing a series of video clips of its behaviors for those interested in raptors.

In this video, more Cooper’s Hawk closeups.

Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup - 5 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch

 

More information on Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooper):

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup – 4 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch [Video]

June 30th, 2016 Comments off

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup – 4 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch 

This Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) has become an almost daily visitor to the garden in the last few weeks, so I’ll be sharing a series of video clips of its behaviors for those interested in raptors.

In this video, you can see the hawk in closeup and in direct sunlight.

Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup - 4 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch [Video]

 

More information on Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooper):

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup – 3 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch [Video]

June 26th, 2016 Comments off

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup – 3 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch 

This Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) has become an almost daily visitor to the garden in the last few weeks, so I’ll be sharing a series of video clips of its behaviors for those interested in raptors.

In this video, you can see the hawk in closeup.

Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Closeup - 3 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch

 

More information on Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooper):

The Squirrel, The Hawk and the Hummingbird – 2 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch

June 23rd, 2016 Comments off

The Squirrel, The Hawk and the Hummingbird – 2 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch 

This Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) has become an almost daily visitor to the garden in the last few weeks, so I’ll be sharing a series of video clips of its behaviors for those interested in raptors.

In this video, the Cooper’s Hawk sits on the birdbath while a squirrel feeds below and a hummingbird sits on the feeder in the foreground.

The Squirrel, The Hawk and the Hummingbird - 2 in a series from My Word with Douglas E. Welch

 

More information on Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooper):

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) – 1 in a series [Video]

June 21st, 2016 Comments off

Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) – 1 in a series

This Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) has become an almost daily visitor to the garden in the last few weeks, so I’ll be sharing a series of video clips of its behaviors for those interested in raptors.

In this video you can see the hawk spreading its wings when a squirrel on the ground approaches too closely. I have seen this behavior several times in the past. sometimes with the squirrel actively chasing off the hawk.

Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) - 1 in a series

 

More information on Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooper):

Join us for Arduino NIght at Hackerspace LA! – Wed, June 8, 2016

June 4th, 2016 Comments off
I’ll be at this upcoming Hackerspace LA meetup showing off what I’ve learned about Arduino in the last few months. Join me for demos and discussion. Bring your own projects to share!

Join this free meetup as we learn about more and tinker with the Arduino electronic microcontrollers and learn about building all types of circuits. Arduinos are small electronics boards that can be used to create easy to sophisticated circuits with wires and sensors. Bring your own laptop, Arduino and bread board.  This is for anyone, at any level, to come and have some fun tinkering, learning, and showing off your own projects.


RSVP for Arduino Night via Meetup
RSVP for Arduino Night via Eventbrite

Seeing Differently 13: Raindrop Ripples in Slow Motion [Video] (1:02)

April 20th, 2016 Comments off

Liked: Arduino Radar Project [Video]

April 8th, 2016 Comments off

Planes, Gliders and Paper Rockets: Simple Flying Things Anyone Can Make–Kites and Copters, Too! [Book]

February 9th, 2016 Comments off
Planes, Gliders and Paper Rockets: Simple Flying Things Anyone Can Make–Kites and Copters, Too!
Rick Schertle and James Floyd Kelly

I wish I had found this book a few years ago when my son was younger. It would have greatly helped established my “Dad Credentials” when he came to me with his imaginative and fun project ideas. I am somewhat handy and can make some basic things, but having Planes, Gliders and Paper Rockets around as a ready reference guide sure would have helped. That said, if you have kids who want to start “making”, this is a great, fun place to start.

Planes, Gliders and Paper Rockets provides several projects from paper helicopters (with optional, but cool, LED lights), Rubber band airplanes, kites, foam air rockets and more. According to the book’s preface, this is the first in a series of books from Maker Media and sets a good example for the other books in the series. I’ll certainly be on the lookout for more like this.

Each project provides some basic discussion starters about the scientific concepts involved in each project and then moves into a careful and well illustrated step-by-step guide for building and then flying the project. All the photos are clear and well-captioned. Templates are included when useful and a complete supplies list are provided for each project. Some projects can also be purchased from Make as complete kits, ready to be assembled.

Planes, Gliders and Paper Rockets would be a great book for kids and adults to work through together, over the course of several weeks or months — growing in skills with each project. Older kids could put together many of these projects on their own, if they were looking for a place to start their own maker adventures.

Of course, a book like this is could also be used in any educational environment to discuss a wide variety of engineering, aeronautical and scientific concepts. Hands-on activities are a great way of clarifying and solidifying new concepts by applying theories as soon as possible after they are learned.

If you’re looking to get away from your computer for a while and enjoy some time making things with your hands instead of just your mind, Planes, Gliders and Paper Rockets is a great place to start.

Rick Schertle is a master at the craft of teaching middle school in San Jose and a novice maker at home. His diverse interests include backyard chickens, adventure travel, veggie oil-fueled cars and geocaching – all made more fun with the enthusiastic support of his wife and the crazy antics of his young son and daughter.

James is a writer who lives in Atlanta, GA with his wife and two young sons. He has degrees in Industrial Engineering and English and enjoys making things, writing about those things, and training young makers. He has written over 25 books on a variety of subjects from LEGO robotics to Open Source software to building your own CNC machine and 3D printer.

Recommended

Categories: Books, DIY, Fun, Make, Science Tags:

Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) in the Los Angele River (Silent) [Video]

December 28th, 2015 Comments off

1.5 minutes of footage of Black-necked Stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in the Los Angeles River taken on December 20, 2015 in Burbank, California.

Black-necked Stilt

 

From Wikipedia…

The black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) is a locally abundant shorebird of American wetlands and coastlines. It is found from the coastal areas of California through much of the interior western United States and along the Gulf of Mexico as far east as Florida, then south through Central America and the Caribbean to northwest Brazil southwest Peru, east Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands. The northernmost populations, particularly those from inland, are migratory, wintering from the extreme south of the United States to southern Mexico, rarely as far south as Costa Rica; on the Baja California peninsula it is only found regularly in winter.[2]

It is often treated as a subspecies of the common or black-winged stilt, using the trinomial name Himantopus himantopus mexicanus.[3] However, the AOU has always considered it a species in its own right, and the scientific name Himantopus mexicanus is often seen. Matters are more complicated though; sometimes all five distinct lineages of the Common Stilt are treated as different species. But the White-necked Stilt from southern South America (H. h. melanurus when only one species is recognized), parapatric and intergrading to some extent with its northern relative where their ranges meet, would warrant inclusion with the Black-necked stilt when this is separated specifically, becoming Himantopus mexicanus melanurus. Similarly, the Hawaiian stilt, H. m. knudseni, is likely to belong to the American species when this is considered separate; while some treat it as another distinct species, the AOU, BirdLife International and the IUCN do not.[4] Thus, in their scheme the black-necked stilt is properly named Himantopus mexicanus mexicanus.[5]

Read the entire article

Google+