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Posts Tagged ‘Feedly’

Children are leading archaeological investigations in Scotland – and enriching whole communities via The Next Web

April 3rd, 2020 No comments
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Voleflix, a public domain movie site via MetaFilter

April 3rd, 2020 No comments
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This new quarantine game lets you play with friends from home + your smart speaker via RouteNote Blog

April 3rd, 2020 No comments
 

This party game sets you the task of talking to your Smart Speaker in just the right way to win this new quarantine game.
Hey Robot is a game that’s been building support on Kickstarter and is yet to launch in full. However it’s lovely creators saw everyone getting bored whilst stuck at home self-isolating and have launched a rough version early that is free to play.

You need either an Amazon Alexa or Google Home speaker, they say it doesn’t work so well with phones. You place that near to your computer and call your friends to bring them in and you’re off in one of the two game modes.

To play Hey Robot, you have to make your Smart Speaker say a word or certain phrase without saying it yourself. It’s like taboo with a robotic and sometimes nonsensical player who also happens to have a hell of a lot at their disposal.

Amazon and SXSW will host a 10-day online film festival this month via Input

April 2nd, 2020 No comments
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Home School: The history of the world according to corn – Chris A. Kniesly via TedEd on YouTube

April 2nd, 2020 No comments

Trace the 9,000 year old history of the domestication of corn, or maize, and its effects on global agriculture.

Corn currently accounts for more than one tenth of our global crop production. And over 99% of cultivated corn is the exact same type: Yellow Dent #2. This means that humans grow more Yellow Dent #2 than any other plant on the planet. So how did this single variety of this single plant become the biggest success story in agricultural history? Chris Kniesly investigates the rise of this wonder-crop.

Lesson by Chris A. Kniesly, directed by Artrake Studio.

Watch The history of the world according to corn – Chris A. Kniesly via TedEd on YouTube

Home School: Evelyn Lambart and Animation: “I was always fascinated by cutouts…” via MetaFilter

April 2nd, 2020 No comments
Evelyn Lambart and Animation:

Stricken with hearing loss from an early age, Lambart flourished at the National Film Board, where she became the first woman animator in Canada. She collaborated with esteemed animator Norman McLaren for many years, notably on the innovative, jazzy Begone Dull Care (1949).

Lambart’s first solo film was The Impossible Map (1947), a quirky, earnest experiment with grapefruit, knives and cartography. Making Movie History: Evelyn Lambart is an excellent 5-minute doc about her career.

Lambart also used her distinctive black-background animation style in The Story of Christmas (1973). Her meticulous cutout process is shown in the NFB documentaries Eleven Moving Moments with Evelyn Lambart (see 32:00) and The Light Fantastick (see 47:00). She died in 1999.

Coronavirus Kitchen: These Pumpkin Bars Are Like Eating a Pie, a Cookie, and a Crumble All at Once via The Kitchn

April 2nd, 2020 No comments
Sounds like a lovely bit of comfort food to brighten your day! — Douglas
 
If the hardest decision at your holiday table is choosing between desserts — be it a slice of pumpkin pie, a scoop of seasonal fruit crumble, or even a simple sugar cookie — these pumpkin pie bars are a sweet solution to your Thanksgiving troubles. Made with a sweet cookie crust, a spiced pumpkin filling, and a buttery oat crumble, these pumpkin pie bars will satisfy all your cravings — and they couldn’t be easier to make.

Isolation Entertainment: The Globe is streaming a Shakespeare play for free every fortnight via Time Out London

March 31st, 2020 No comments
 

The latest London theatre to step up to the plate with free high-quality content is Shakespeare’s Globe. The iconic Elizabethan-style playhouse already had its own public streaming platform in the form of Globe Player, but watching it has always come at a fairly steep rate, with productions rented or purchased at individual prices that usually exceed a month’s full access to many TV streaming platforms. As of next Monday (April 6), that changes.

First up is a full English-language Shakespeare play per fortnight available for free. The line-up kicks off with 2018’s ‘Hamlet’, starring Globe boss Michelle Terry in the title role of the doomed Danish prince.

 Second up, every single production from the 2012 Globe to Globe series will be made available for free, for the whole period. So that’s a Korean ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, a Macedonian ‘Henry VI Part 3’, a Polish ‘Macbeth’, a Hebrew ‘The Merchant of Venice’ and so on and so forth. You can find the full list here.

Isolation Entertainment: London’s National Theatre Starts Streaming Its Most Famous Productions Across The World For Free via Forbes

March 31st, 2020 No comments

The Internet Archive Is Digitizing & Preserving Over 100,000 Vinyl Records: Hear 750 Full Albums Now via Open Culture

March 30th, 2020 No comments
 

There seems to be widespread agreement—something special was lost in the rushed-to-market move from physical media to digital streaming. We have come to admit that some older musical technologies cannot be improved upon. Musicians, producers, engineers spend thousands to replicate the sound of older analog recording technology, with all its quirky, inconsistent operation. And fans buy record players and vinyl records in surprisingly increasing numbers to hear the warm and fuzzy character of their sound.

Neil Young, who has relentlessly criticized every aspect of digital recording, has dismissed the resurgence of the LP as a “fashion statement” given that most new albums released on vinyl are digital masters. But buyers come to vinyl with a range of expectations, writes Ari Herstand at Digital Music News: “Vinyl is an entire experience. Wonderfully tactile…. When we stare at our screens for the majority of our days, it’s nice to look at art that doesn’t glow and isn’t the size of my hand.” Vinyl can feel and look as good as it sounds (when properly engineered).