Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Close

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘blog’

Do you remember how unique you once were? from the Career Opportunities Podcast

October 16th, 2017 Comments off

  Career op logo 2012 itunes

Listen to this podcast

Take a moment to look around you while you read this column or listen to the podcast. Take in all your surroundings. Notice the clothes you wear, the furniture in your office, the books on your bookshelves. Look at the art on your walls, the DVDs near your player. Now, consider what all this says about you. Do all these things represent a unique individual or could this be the home or office of the mythical “Everyman”? Do these items present you as someone special or yet another cog in the world’s machinery?

The fact is, the nature of the modern advertising world and the nature of our corporate work within that world is to make us all like those around us. Where we once started out with all sorts of unique points and edges and curves, the world slowly grinds these off, often leaving us as round and smooth as everyone around us. There was a time, though, when we truly saw ourselves as unique individuals in the world. Long before kindergarten, peer pressure, high school, job interviews, and years of work, we once reveled in our individuality, our uniqueness. There was no other Doug, Rosanne, Jenny, Tracy or Jennifer quite like us.

Read this entire article – Do you remember how unique you once were?

 


Now available exclusively to Career Opportunities readers and Listeners.

Click for more information and pricing 



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs 

** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

Podcasting, YouTube and Live streaming from Two Challenges in Building Your Career [Audio] (0:52)

April 11th, 2016 Comments off

A Clip from Two Challenges in Building the Career You Deserve with Douglas E. Welch. 

Watch the entire presentation.

Podcasting, YouTube and Live streaming from Two Challenges in Building Your Career

Listen to this clip

 

Douglas E. Welch (http://douglasewelch.com) presents to the class Career Development – Theories and Techniques at Pepperdine Graduate School of Education & Psychology taught by fellow CareerCamp Co-Chair, Danielle Gruen

The two biggest challenges are deciding what you want to do as a career and then building the career you deserve once you decide.

I discuss the Career Compass method of discovering your career wants, needs and desires and then using various social media tools to show people “What you do and how well you do it”

Transcript:

Last year, podcasting has exploded — with The Serial podcast and all these other — for whatever reason it has suddenly hit its moment. And so, I am recommending to people — if you have and interest in that — if you have have an interest either an audio podcast or a video podcast. Most of my gardening podcasts are video podcasts, which I also post to YouTube and elsewhere. If you have an interest in that, pursue it. It’s not as scary as it once was and it’s not as technically fraught as it once was. Literally, with your phone now, there’s the YouTube Capture app. I can send — record a video and post it to YouTube directly from my phone. Last week, as South by Southwest, and app came out called Meerkat which is basically, bring it up, click this, click that, I’m live streaming right now. Boom. And we’re live streaming on the Internet. It automatically got tweeted out and people can start to watch right now.

Links for items mentioned in this talk:

Help Support Career Opportunities!

Podcasting, YouTube and Live streaming from Two Challenges in Building Your Career [Video] (0:52)

April 11th, 2016 Comments off

A Clip from Two Challenges in Building the Career You Deserve with Douglas E. Welch. 

Watch the entire presentation.

Podcasting, YouTube and Live streaming from Two Challenges in Building Your Career

 

Douglas E. Welch (http://douglasewelch.com) presents to the class Career Development – Theories and Techniques at Pepperdine Graduate School of Education & Psychology taught by fellow CareerCamp Co-Chair, Danielle Gruen

The two biggest challenges are deciding what you want to do as a career and then building the career you deserve once you decide.

I discuss the Career Compass method of discovering your career wants, needs and desires and then using various social media tools to show people “What you do and how well you do it”

Transcript:

Last year, podcasting has exploded — with The Serial podcast and all these other — for whatever reason it has suddenly hit its moment. And so, I am recommending to people — if you have and interest in that — if you have have an interest either an audio podcast or a video podcast. Most of my gardening podcasts are video podcasts, which I also post to YouTube and elsewhere. If you have an interest in that, pursue it. It’s not as scary as it once was and it’s not as technically fraught as it once was. Literally, with your phone now, there’s the YouTube Capture app. I can send — record a video and post it to YouTube directly from my phone. Last week, as South by Southwest, and app came out called Meerkat which is basically, bring it up, click this, click that, I’m live streaming right now. Boom. And we’re live streaming on the Internet. It automatically got tweeted out and people can start to watch right now.

Links for items mentioned in this talk:

Help Support Career Opportunities!

Archive: Our passions — from the Career Opportunities Podcast

October 24th, 2014 Comments off

Our Passions

Career Opportunities Logo 2012

From the Career Opportunities Archives…

Two weekends ago I attended the latest incarnation of BarCampLA. This unconference has become one of the highlights of my year as I get to “confer, converse and otherwise hobnob with my fellow wizards!” For a more detailed overview of what BarCamp is, you can visit the web site at http://barcampla.org. While that will give you a somewhat technical definition of BarCamp, for me is it a weekend devoted to passions. Passions about life, work and the world at large. 

Read this entire column – Our Passions

Listen to this Podcast


Enjoy this podcast? Consider a donation via PayPal to support further career talks, videos, podcasts and clips. 

 


Archive: Bad reputations follow you everywhere — from the Career Opportunities Podcast

January 3rd, 2014 Comments off

Career Opportuntiies Logo 2012

All it takes is one indiscretion, one moment of anger, to brand you with a bad reputation. Even worse, once people develop an opinion of you as a troublemaker, they may see issues where none really exist. Sometimes, we can damage our own reputation so badly that other’s expect us to be a problem. This was brought home to me again, as I watched my son’s latest Little League game.

The story goes back about 2 weeks. During another baseball game, the coaches and managers of one team had words with the coaches and parents of our team over the style of play they encouraged. The umpire (I can never imagine trying to do that job) had to sort things out, but the damage was already done. Complaints were filed with the league about one particular coach. As usual, word of this incident got around among the other teams and, most importantly, the other umpires.

Listen to this Podcast


 

 
 
Books by Douglas E. Welch
  

Fast forward to this week, when my son’s team faced this same coach. Sitting in the stands, I overheard the umpire’s instructions to the coaches and thought they seemed adversarial right from the start. Hmm. Had this umpire heard about the previous incident? Around the second inning of the game, I notice that the opposing coach had been removed from the game and was loudly complaining to league officials in the parking lot. I wondered what had happened, as I hadn’t seen anything overt.

As far as I can tell, the umpire for this game had heard about the previous incident and was determined to avoid any sort of repeat occurrence. In that light, he was looking for even the slightest infraction and then took advantage of that to resolve the problem as quickly as possible. Was this fair? I don’t really know, as I don’t know what precipitated the coach’s removal, but it points up the problem with how quickly developing any sort of bad reputation can effect your work.

The same thing can happen to you in your work and career. Once people have developed an opinion about you, it can color every other interaction. If you complain once, you might be branded as the complainer in the company. Slack off once and you are the slacker. It is horribly unfair, but it occurs every day. In order to deal with the speed at which life comes at us, we often fall back on making assumptions, snap judgments and stereotypes. This coping mechanism serves no one well, though. We can be labeled unfairly and we can also label others unfairly. This then leads to further complications, which can derail personal relationships and leave us wondering where it all went wrong.

Develop a reputation for one trait and it will dog you for a long time, just as it did this coach. Those around you will expect you to act in a certain way and each time you do, it will only confirm their judgment further. Over time you can dig yourself a very deep hole.

So, how do you combat this “pigeonhole” effect? You must start with the very first occurrence. If you feel that you are starting to develop a bad reputation in a particular area, you must address it immediately. Had this coach talked with previous umpires and coaches and tried to find an amicable understanding the first time, he might not have had to face this second confrontation. Instead, those around him simply assumed that he would continue to act as he had in the past.

Next, this coach also had to turn around these expectations by going out of his way to act in exactly the opposite fashion. For example, if you are seen as “the complainer”, “the hothead” or “the slacker,” you have to do everything in your power to counteract these opinions. In some cases you may simply have to “bite your tongue” in public and address issues in private with individuals. If you get angry during a meeting, you will have to spend weeks NOT getting angry. Changing perceptions is extremely difficult so you have to work at least twice as hard to change them as you did to develop these perceptions.

Think of Ebenezer Scrooge in Dicken’s A Christmas Carol. He didn’t get just a little bit better, he changed completely. To quote, “He was better than his word. He did it all and infinitely more.” The best career advice is to always work to build the best reputation possible and, if you stumble, immediately correct your actions so you aren’t saddled with a bad reputation that can limit your effectiveness in your job and your career.

***

Archive: Make your resume a blog — from the Career Opportunities Podcast

July 26th, 2013 Comments off

Career Opportuntiies Logo 2012

You can find advice on how to build, design and send your resume almost anywhere. They will tell you how to format it, which font to choose and what information to include. Heck, even I’ve written my share of columns on resumes. Despite this, though, I want to offer one more bit of resume wisdom. In this age of ubiquitous Internet access, search engines and an increase in the serendipity of finding the right job for you, the next step may be to make your resume a blog, because, in many ways, your blog might already be turning into your resume.


Books by Douglas E. Welch
  

Even in today’s high-tech world, resumes are still seen as relatively static, paper-based documents. Even if they eventually make it into electronic systems, in our minds we still see them as little sheets of paper that get shuffled around on someone’s desk. Just as the professionally printed resume has long gone out of style, I believe any form of printed resume is on its way out, as well.

In past columns I have preached the gospel of a portfolio-based approach to advertising your skills and work experience. Yes, I use the word advertising purposely, as that is exactly what you are doing. You are advertising what you know and what you do, in hopes of someone buying your services.
Part of building a great portfolio is documenting your interesting projects past and present and documenting them as soon after completion as possible. In some cases, you will probably want to do it even while you are completing the project. You want to capture the best “stories” about your project now so you can use them in your resume and in your interviews. It is these stories of actual work and projects that will best communicate your skills to perspective employers.

So, with these ideas in mind, one great way of exposing your work portfolio and resume to the widest group of potential employers is to put it into a blog. Sure, you will probably still have to produce the standard, one-page resume for those people stuck in the past, but producing your resume as a blog has many distinct advantages.

First, a resume blog allows all your stories to be slurped up by any number of search engines including Google, Yahoo and more. This increases the chance that someone might randomly stumble across you when they are looking for just the right person. Sure, an online version of your paper resume might do in a pinch, but you can do better.

Instead of having only one small description of each past job, I encourage you to post to your resume blog as often as necessary. Minimally, this would include a wrap-up after any major projects or accomplishments. Again, all this information becomes searchable and it helps to lock the stories into your mind so you can easily recall them during interviews or casual meetings with potential employers.

Now, go even further. Document any training you receive and your impressions of how it will be useful to your future work. Describe the hardware and software tools you use and why. The general rule is to include anything that would give a potential employer deeper insight into you and your work. The goal in all of this, beyond finding the best job possible, is to use the easy-to-use features of a blog to capture and share as much information about your work and skills as possible. The more information that is available, the better your chances of getting an interview and a job.

It is so much easier to update a resume blog than updating a paper resume and it can say so much more. Your resume blog can become the hub of your online portfolio, available 24/7 from any where in the world. Sure, you can then use this information to update your paper resume, but my hope is that paper resume will soon go the way of the 386 processor and dot matrix printers — useful in their time, but long, long gone.

Get your work experience, your skills and your career stories out onto the net where they can do you the most good. Don’t hide your light under a bushel. Let it shine and help build the career you deserve.

***

Google+