Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Close

Archive

Archive for June, 2008

Not everyone is happy when you change

June 27th, 2008 Comments off

Career Opportunities podcast logoNot everyone is happy when you change
By Douglas E. Welch

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen: Not everyone is happy when you change

Despite the struggle it can sometimes be, growth and change are an important part of any career. If you aren’t growing and changing every day, you are probably falling behind. You should constantly be looking for new skills, new challenges and new positions where you can have the most impact. Usually, those around us, our friends and family, are supportive of our changes. They want to see us grow, too. On occasion, though, there are people who see changes in your life as threatening to their own status quo. If you gain success by changing, what does that mean for them if they remain the same. Humans can be caring individuals, but sometimes they can get wrapped up in their own emotions.

I am sure you have seen this in action in your own life. You decide to lose some weight and then a friend constantly entices you to go to one restaurant or another. You disclose your desire to move to a new town, only to hear all the negative aspects of living there. You are looking for a promotion and your co-workers try to convince you that it would either be too hard of a job or that you could never succeed at it. This natural desire to maintain the status quo can take many forms from benign to destructive, but you always need to look beyond what your friends are saying and find the underlying cause.

Jealousy is often a big factor when others are resistant to changes in your life. This doesn’t mean that they are doing it out of malice, or even doing it with conscious thought. It often means that they are simply feeling an unrequited need in their own life or career which your change highlights. Sure, some people can take this to ugly extremes, but typically people are just bemoaning the fact that they haven’t made the changes you are making.

Think about a time when you were jealous of someone else’s success. How did you feel? How did you react? Don’t kid yourself, either. We all feel jealousy. We might feel it to greater and lesser degrees and some of us might let it go more easily, but we all feel it on occasion.

Listen to the advice of your friends and family, then do it anyway.

Another cause of conflict comes from some people’s sense of scarcity. Despite all the abundance in our world, they can easily fall into the thought that every reward someone else receives is a reward that is lost to them. Every job someone else gets is one they lost. Every bit of praise, every promotion, every dollar is something they lose. You might imagine how this could make someone bitter. Worse still, it has nothing to do with you particularly, but only with their overriding view of how the world works.

You need to be especially aware of these people, as they can be the most destructive to your ability to change and grow. They will poison every contact, every conversation and might even actively try to thwart your change by spreading rumors and other attacks on your skills and work. These people can easily turn their disappointment to malice.

So, now that you know what may face you when you announce any major change in your life, do it. No one can stop us from making the changes we need, except ourselves. Listen to the advice of your friends and family, then do it anyway. Listen to the negative aspects proposed by your co-workers, and do it anyway. Face all the resistance that you will receive, and do it anyway. Will you change your methods, adjust your goals, postpone a move? Maybe. If you do, though, you will do it with the full knowledge of the feelings of those around you and how it might effect their behavior.

We are all flawed human beings and we sometimes don’t do the right thing for ourselves or others. We need to recognize that fact and allow ourselves to pursue change, even when it might cause friction with those around us. We need to see them as human and understand that our great success might bring out some bitter or painful thoughts and memories. It doesn’t mean you shouldn’t change, simply to avoid this, but rather that you should change anyway, and help those around you change, as well.


Get daily career tips via Twitter — follow careertips


Join me on these networks:

Follow Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn

Become a Facebook Fan of Career Opportunities


Support Career Opportunities:

One time:


Monthly ($2):














iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

Archive: By Example – May 20, 2005

June 25th, 2008 Comments off

(This podcast is pulled “from the archives” and presented here as a service to more recent listeners — Douglas)

Career Opportunities podcast logo

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen to this episode
Read the entire article

Ask any married couple and you will quickly learn that you can’t make anyone change. You can wish them to change, ask them to change, demand they change, even threaten them to change, but, in the end, change can’t be imposed from the outside, it can only grow from within. This is also true of your work relationships. As much as you would like to change your co-workers, your manager or your employees, you can’t. There is hope though. When people are given a good example to follow, they can, eventually, discover for themselves that there are benefits to change. So, instead of sighing, shouting or screaming, your main task is to simply provide a good example.


Join me on these networks:

Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn


Support Career Opportunities:


iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

Elsewhere Online: Career Change from the Inside Out

June 25th, 2008 Comments off

I will definitely be checking out both of these books in the near future. I mentioned Johnny Bunko a couple of weeks ago and linked to the “trailer” for the book, but I haven’t yet acquired it.

From the description of the books, they fit right into the Career Opportunities philosophy of career, where you focus on what is best for you.

Career Change from the Inside Out

Pamela Skilling’s Escape from Corporate America and Daniel H. Pink’s The Adventures of Johnny Bunko

I just read something scary on Twitter. Jonathan Fields – entrepreneur extraordinaire (I interviewed him on Lifehack Live) – posted about a conversation he’d had with a friend who “didn’t get how I could live w/ ‘stress’ of being entrepreneur and not having someone else pay me.”

It’s true: there are people in the world who will take an amazing amount of crap – layoffs, verbal abuse, boredom, office politics, and more – in exchange for the perceived security of having someone else write them a check every week.

This isn’t a post about becoming an entrepreneur, it’s a post about doing something to deal with a job that drags you down. More specifically, it’s a post about two inspiring books I’ve recently read, both of which take on the subject of career change in interesting, creative, and very different ways.

(Continue reading on the web site)

Categories: Books, Elsewhere, News/Opinion Tags:

Summer Solstice is time for reflection and projection

June 20th, 2008 Comments off

Career Opportunities podcast logoSummer Solstice is time for reflection and projection
By Douglas E. Welch

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen: Summer Solstice is time for reflection and projection

I woke up today and was utterly amazed that it was rapidly approaching the end of June. Tomorrow is the Summer Solstice,the longest day of the year. The days only grow shorter until they reach the nadir of the year on December 21, the shortest day of the year. Yearly mileposts like this always get me thinking about where I have been and where I am going. You should do the same. You might not have the time later in the year.

Looking back

Take a few moments today to go back over your calendar for the first six months of 2008. Which projects have you accomplished? Which remain to be completed? What deadlines where met, which ones were missed entirely and which ones are rapidly approaching in the second half of the year? Much like today, it will be here almost before you realize it.

If you keep a journal, paper or electronic, look over the ideas you captured since January. Are there any ideas you would like to start implementing? Any forgotten tasks that need to be put on the front burner? In my case, I often find that I spoke with a client about implementing a new system or procedure, but other concerns pushed it out of our minds. This is the time to re-dedicate yourself and get some of these projects back on track.

Finally, get together with friends — something that is fairly natural in the summer — let your conversations spur new ideas and new projects. Sharing our lives with our friends and families is often one of the most productive things we can do.

Looking forward

One of the first items I look at is calendar items for the next 6 months. In many cases, we know what major deadlines are coming many months in advance. It is important to get these into your calendar now, so that they give you a series of mileposts into the future. Even something as simple as scheduling your semi-annual dentist appointment or notating the start date for your son’s school helps to give you a feeling for the rest of the year. Organization expert, David Allen, calls this the “hard landscape” of your life. Some of these events can be rescheduled, but many are outside your control. You need to have them in place so you can think about how you will fit more flexible tasks around them. Also, I know for myself, seeing these items in my calendar as I schedule and plan gives me a feeling for the direction of my work and life. They are gentle reminders of the tasks I need to complete today in order to be ready for tomorrow.

Summer provides us a great time for thinking and planning, as life is usually somewhat slower, unless you are heavily involved in a seasonal business. In that case, Winter Solstice might be your major planning time. For most folks, though, we get a few more minutes to sit in the garden or at the beach, or hover over the barbecue, where thoughts can come to us unhindered. Families are typically together more, so planing for major family events can also be a bit easier. The important part is to capture your thoughts, ideas and plans when they come to you. Keep a journal and calendar near you, so you can jot down ideas, schedule events and generally plan your year in a very casual way.

Taking advantage of the summer months can bring great benefits later in the year when life and business speeds up again. As Fall arrives, school and work get back in gear and simply living our lives can reduce the time for planning and consideration. A little planning now can save you many headaches down the road.

Seasonal Tips:

• Start buying holiday gifts now. Don’t wait until the holiday rush is upon you
• Start making holiday gifts now in order to easily complete them in time.
• Plan school milestones for this year. Do you have Science Fair? Senior Play?
• Plan tax-related purchases, etc as you approach end of your fiscal year
• Plan auto maintenance before Winter arrives. Schedule dates now for snow tires, antifreeze, etc.
• Plan and budget for upcoming conferences, business meetings and travel


Get daily career tips via Twitter — follow careertips


Join me on these networks:

Follow Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn

Become a Facebook Fan of Career Opportunities


Support Career Opportunities:

One time:


Monthly ($2):














iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

What do you think? — You’ll Pay to Quit This Job! One Company’s Nightmare Hiring Policy…

June 19th, 2008 Comments off

I have my own opinions on policies like this, but before I own up to them, I want to know your feelings? Is charging employees the answer to company turnover? Is it even legal?

You can leave both text and video comments by using the Comments link below.

You’ll Pay to Quit This Job! One Company’s Nightmare Hiring Policy…

One of the best email newsletters I subscribe to is Nick Corcodilos’ Ask the Headhunter

It is a fun newsletter that’s very informative.  And today’s issue was especially so.  A reader wrote in asking about an email received by a recruiter.  Apparently, the company in question requires all employees sign an agreement to stay on for 18 months and if they don’t, they have to pay to leave:

(Continue reading on the web site)

(Via Achieve IT!.)

Categories: News/Opinion Tags:

Archive: Never Enough – May 13, 2005

June 18th, 2008 Comments off

(This podcast is pulled “from the archives” and presented here as a service to more recent listeners — Douglas)

Career Opportunities podcast logo

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen to this episode
Read the entire article

Would you rather work for someone who praised you for your good work, or someone who constantly denigrated your efforts? It seems an easy choice to make, but every day I see people, managers and high-tech staffers alike trapped in relationships where praise is in short supply. Even more, these same businesses often fail or never even approach their optimal levels of success. Yet, these people often see no connection between the lack of praise and the fortunes of a store, department or company. The “Never Enough” syndrome can drive many a high-tech worker into other jobs, if not other careers.


Join me on these networks:

Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn


Support Career Opportunities:


iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

Retirement is not a goal, it is a path

June 13th, 2008 Comments off

Career Opportunities podcast logoRetirement is not a goal, it is a path
By Douglas E. Welch

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen: Retirement is not a goal, it is a path

For over a century, workers have been taught that the end goal, the final payoff of any career is retirement — that blissful time at the end of our lives when we won’t have to work anymore. It should be obvious by now, though, that retirement is not the golden dream it once was. Some might even argue that postponing your happiness until you are too old to enjoy it was never a very good idea. In today’s work world, retirement should not be the main goal of your career. Instead, replace that with the twin goals of having more freedom and more effect in your career throughout your life.

Again and again we hear stories of people trapped in a career they hate and their only sense of a lifeline — an escape route — is retirement. How sad this is to me. I can’t imagine the daily grind they must experience or how disappointed they are likely to be when retirement finally arrives. Furthermore, I can’t imagine how they can justify the wasting of their time and their lives in pursuit of goals they care nothing about. Surely a career has to mean something more than this.

In this new century, a career is not something to be survived. A career is an important part of your life, not something that merely supports you. Today’s career should serve multiple goals. First, it should support you with the money necessary to survive. Along with that, though, it should offer you a way to dramatically effect the world around you and it should provide you with a growing sense of freedom as you progress through your life. Sure, traditional retirement may provide you with a sense of freedom at the end, but in today’s career this is a continuum of freedom that grows along with your skills and influence. Retirement becomes the culmination of a lifelong process instead of an abrupt ending.

In some cases, you might never completely retire. I know that I cannot foresee a future where I would retire in any traditional sense. I will always want to be working on something — some project, some foundation, some book — until the day I die. For me, it will be a progression of more and more freedom in how I spend that very precious gift — time. So should it be for you.

Worse still, you will eventually come to a place in your career where you are simply “killing time” until retirement arrives.

Sure, early in a career, our lives are dictated by the needs of our employers, but each day, each week, each year, we should, through our good work, develop ways of expressing our own ideas, our own desires and our own goals more and more. If you allow yourself to become a mere cog in the machine of industry, your life will become more controlled, more circumscribed by your work. In many cases, you will fall into the traditional idea of retirement as your only way out. Worse still, you will eventually come to a place in your career where you are simply “killing time” until retirement arrives.

You are depriving more than yourself when you fall into this trap. You won’t accomplish many of the goals you might have had over the years, but even more important, the world will be denied the great successes you might have accomplished had you sought to increase your effectiveness and freedom every day. Our school teachers often called it “not living up to our potential” and saw it as a great waste. This is how I see it as well — a great waste of whatever gifts you were given at birth. For me, living only with retirement in mind is a great waste of your talent, skills and insight. You deserve the benefit of your talent and so does the world.

I am always greatly disturbed when I talk to a young person, maybe only in their mid-twenties, who has already given in to the retirement trap. You see this most often in more traditional career such as law, medicine and big business, but it can effect almost anyone. I want to shake them by the shoulders and tell them there is so much more to life, if only they would reach out for it. I guess you could say that that is often a driving force in many of these columns. The world has changed, but many of us are still living with our parents’, or grandparents’, idea of work and career. We owe it to ourselves and our children to embrace the new possibilities of career versus work.

Starting today, live each day as if it mattered, because it truly does. Find ways to express your own unique thoughts and desires. Find ways to develop a small piece of freedom in your life. See retirement as a continuous process of improvement and growth instead of something you achieve simply by putting in the required number of days, months and years. If you do, your satisfaction with your life and your career will surely grow, your freedom to make decisions that are best for you and your family will take precedence, while you career becomes something important instead of something to survive until you get your gold watch. That is truly the career you deserve.


Get daily career tips via Twitter — follow careertips


Join me on these networks:

Follow Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn

Become a Facebook Fan of Career Opportunities


Support Career Opportunities:

One time:


Monthly ($2):














iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

Archive: A Technological World – May 6, 2005

June 11th, 2008 Comments off

(This podcast is pulled “from the archives” and presented here as a service to more recent listeners — Douglas)

Career Opportunities podcast logo

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen to this episode
Read the entire article

If you want to be very clear about your feelings towards your current job, here is a little test. Find a child (son, daughter, nephew, niece, friend’s kid) and try to explain to them what you do for a living. If you are really lucky, you will have a child come to you with the same question. Don’t think about your answers. Just talk. You might be surprised at what comes out of your mouth. If so, capture those thoughts any way you can, because they represent your true feelings about your work.


Join me on these networks:

Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn


Support Career Opportunities:


iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

The end of the week, but also the beginning

June 6th, 2008 1 comment

Career Opportunities podcast logoThe end of the week, but also the beginning
By Douglas E. Welch

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen: The end of the week, but also the beginning

Ahhhhh, Another Friday. Another end to another long week. Now we can all stop thinking about work for 2 days. Right? Well, while I’m as fond of “kicking back” on the weekend as anyone, I also realize that the weekends are when we can, and should, make things happen in our own lives and our own long term careers. The weekend is when we can place a little focus on those projects that mean the most to us. In fact, it might be the only time available to us, if our jobs encompass our entire week.

I am not suggesting your abandon relaxation, fun and family to pursue your great career endeavors each weekend – surely family comes first. That said, there are times when we move from relaxation into complete shut down. I enjoy my cold brew on the weekends, but if you are moving from your 3rd beer to your 4th, you might find better ways of engaging your time and your mind. Your weekend is time to explore new worlds, and old relationships, and not simply shut down. Instead of just tuning out, look for opportunities to engage.

I enjoy my cold brew on the weekends, but if you are moving from your 3rd beer to your 4th, you might find better ways of engaging your time and your mind.

Engagement in your weekend can take a myriad of forms. Maybe you have a pet project you want to move forward. Perhaps you like to work in the garden. Engaging your weekend can even be simply sitting on your patio, sipping the aforementioned beverage and actively thinking or planning. No one says you can work only with your hands. Your mind needs time to think, too. It matters little how you decide to engage your weekend. It is much more important to just do it.

The fact is, working on your own projects and ideas on the weekend can greatly improve your work during the week. Your new thinking and new discoveries on the weekend can often help you solve issues at work – and vice versa. You might think it odd, but building a robot with your son can often open your mind to new solutions at the office. Even if there is no direct correlation between your weekend and weekday work, though, engaging in your own fun activities on the weekend can help to reenergize you for the week ahead. Doing something unusual for yourself can make your day job seem just a bit more interesting.

Even more, engaging in your weekend can help to fight the “Sunday Night Blues” that some of us experience each week. We start to think about all the problems we will face come Monday morning, instead of enjoying the last few hours of our weekend. I know that when I worked at a corporate job I often suffered from this problem myself.

So, in what ways can you engage your weekend? They are almost as varied as life itself, but here are a few to get your started.

• Have a face-to-face meeting with someone you don’t see that often.
• Take your child out for an activity, alone.
• Get loud!
• Get quiet.
• Eat out or stay in and cook from scratch
• Play an instrument – or learn to!
• Learn something new (programming language, foreign language, dancing, cooking, drawing – anything)
• Visit a museum or art gallery
• Go hiking

Whatever you do, don’t just sit around doing nothing. Do something for yourself and your life and your career can only benefit. It might not seem like work, but it can help to build the career you deserve.


Get daily career tips via Twitter — follow careertips


Join me on these networks:

Follow Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn

Become a Facebook Fan of Career Opportunities


Support Career Opportunities:

One time:


Monthly ($2):














iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:

Archive: What do you do? – April 29, 2005

June 4th, 2008 Comments off

(This podcast is pulled “from the archives” and presented here as a service to more recent listeners — Douglas)

Career Opportunities podcast logo

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen to this episode
Read the entire article

If you want to be very clear about your feelings towards your current job, here is a little test. Find a child (son, daughter, nephew, niece, friend’s kid) and try to explain to them what you do for a living. If you are really lucky, you will have a child come to you with the same question. Don’t think about your answers. Just talk. You might be surprised at what comes out of your mouth. If so, capture those thoughts any way you can, because they represent your true feelings about your work.


Join me on these networks:
Douglas on Twitter | Douglas on MySpace | Douglas on Facebook | Douglas on LinkedIn


Support Career Opportunities:


iTunes Review | Career-Op Forums | Digg.com | Podcast Alley | Reader/Listener Line @ 818-804-5049

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Audio, Podcast Tags:
Google+