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Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Recipe: Nutty Banana Sheet Cake via Kitchn

April 28th, 2020 Comments off
Sounds Tasty! Might be a nice one for the Coronavirus Kitchen Series— Douglas
 
Recipe: Nutty Banana Sheet Cake via Kitchn
Now here’s a wholesome cake you can feel equally happy about for dessert as you can for breakfast. A fluffy sheet of banana cake is the perfect partner to a mix of crunchy, earthy nuts and seeds. To make this wholesome cake a bit more sweet, we’re finishing it off with a drizzle of bittersweet chocolate.

Read Recipe: Nutty Banana Sheet Cake via Kitchn


An interesting link found among my daily reading

5 Things Every “Adult” Kitchen Has, According to These Pros via The Kitchn

April 27th, 2020 Comments off

I can’t say I agree with all of these recommendations, but there are a few I could add to my own kitchen. – Douglas

Your kitchen, of all places, is where it can be easy to feel most like an adult. Whipping up homemade oat milk? Meal-prepping on a Sunday? Tending to your sourdough starter? Wait, are you using a digitized thermometer to make sure you’re following proper food safety protocol? High fives all around.

To define exactly what a grown-up kitchen looks like, we turned to home stagers. Here are the five things they say “adult” kitchens have in common.

An interesting link found among my daily reading

How to Make Cannabutter via Food52

April 20th, 2020 Comments off

Over the past decade, I’ve become an expert on cannabis-infused food products, aka edibles. Years ago, I taught myself how to infuse my own confections and since then, I’ve cooked with top chefs on VICE’s stony cooking show Bong Appétit.

I’ve picked up many techniques and tips along the way, but one of the first things I discovered on my magical, edible journey: The effect feels entirely different from smoking a joint. I realized this pretty quickly after baking my first infused apple pie, emptying an entire jar of cannabutter into my homemade crust. Roughly one hour post-devouring a massive slice—and scrounging for the best caramelized, gooey bits stuck to the pan—it hit me all at once (and not in a good way).

Read How to Make Cannabutter via Food52


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Cooking Books – 51 in a series – The new London family cook; or town and country housekeeper’s guide by Duncan MacDonald (1808)

April 20th, 2020 Comments off

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 51 in a series – The new London family cook; or town and country housekeeper’s guide by Duncan MacDonald (1808)

Historical Cooking Books - 51 in a series - The new London family cook; or town and country housekeeper's guide by Duncan MacDonald (1808)

Historical Cooking Books - 51 in a series - The new London family cook; or town and country housekeeper's guide by Duncan MacDonald (1808)

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

 

CONVINCED by my own experience, and by the numerous Complaints of others’, of the deficiency of all former books relating to Cookery and Domestic Economy, I have been induced to pre- pare the following work; in which I trust it will be found that many of the imperfections incidental to earlier publications, have been obviated.

 



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

An Archive of Handwritten Traditional Mexican Cookbooks Is Now Online via Open Culture

April 14th, 2020 Comments off
An Archive of Handwritten Traditional Mexican Cookbooks Is Now Online via Open Culture
“The search for authentic Mexican food—or rather, the struggle to define what that meant—has been going on for two hundred years,” writes Jeffrey Pilcher at Guernica. Arguments over national cuisine first divided into factions along historical lines of conquest. Indigenous, corn-based cuisines were pitted against wheat-based European foods, while Tex-Mex cooking has been “industrialized and carried around the world,” its processed commodification posing an offense to both indigenous peoples and Spanish elites, who themselves later “sought to ground their national cuisine in the pre-Hispanic past” in order to fend off associations with globalized Mexican food of the chain restaurant variety.

Another Day, Another Coffee via Instagram

April 14th, 2020 Comments off

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Another Day, Another Coffee via Instagram

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Wholesale restaurant supply chain opens to the public for the first time — I left with TP, milk, and more (photos/tips) via Boing Boing

April 13th, 2020 Comments off
For the first time in its 40-year history, Restaurant Depot has opened their doors to the public. The wholesale food service supplier has 135 locations in the United States and it just so happens there is one half a mile away from me. I have long wanted to check out, so, after hearing the news on Thursday night, I was in line first thing Friday morning. The promise of in-stock toilet paper, cleaning supplies, and food — at wholesale prices — was just too tempting. Here’s some of what I saw in my nearly two-hour shopping excursion.

Historical Cooking Books – 50 in a series – The still-room (19003) by Charles Roundell, Mrs Harry Roberts

April 13th, 2020 Comments off

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 50 in a series – The still-room (19003) by Charles Roundell, Mrs Harry Roberts

Historical Cooking Books - 49 in a series - The still-room (19003) by Charles Roundell, Mrs Harry Roberts

Historical Cooking Books - 49 in a series - The still-room (19003) by Charles Roundell, Mrs Harry Roberts

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

A PLEA FOR HOUSEWIFERY

WE live in an age which may well be called the age of the purveyor ; and, if we continue travelling along the road upon which we have entered, the time cannot be far distant when it will be held ridiculous to do anything at all for ourselves. To appreciate, to criticize, to display taste in selection — these are the hall-marks of to-day, and home is but another name for a private restaurant. Homes such as those in which Goldsmith and Dickens delighted are now calculated to bring a blush to the cheeks of the superior and the ” artistic.” Of few of our fine ladies can it be said that “they are excellent Housewives, and as capable of descending to the kitchen with propriety as of acting in their exalted stations with dignity.”



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Risotto with Taleggio Cheese (and a Glass of Wine) with Friends via La Cucina Italiana

April 11th, 2020 Comments off
We love risotto and this sounds like an excellent variation to add to our Recipes In Rotation. While the Italians really don’t do macaroni and cheese, this seems a more than worthy substitute. — Douglas
 
You know summer’s over when it’s time to turn back the clock. All you can do is revel in whatever warmth is left and get ready for the arrival of winter. The warmth that never fades, though, comes from the pleasure of cooking for friends. You know those evenings when you’re all together, laughing and telling each other about your latest adventures in front of a good glass of wine? On those evenings there’s no dish better than a risotto. Specifically, a risotto with Taleggio, a rich and creamy cheese, which gives a velvety softness to every dish. It’s a full meal, delicious and satisfying, perfect with a glass of full-bodied but elegant red, like a Pinot Noir or a Barolo.
Read Risotto with Taleggio Cheese (and a Glass of Wine) with Friends via La Cucina Italiana





An interesting link found among my daily reading

Coronavirus Kitchen: Gnocchi alla Ciociaria

April 10th, 2020 Comments off

This is one of our Recipes in Rotation — items we make on a monthly (or so) basis. I used pre-made gnocchi for this yesterday, b often make fresh gnocchi when making this for friends. Gnocchi is one of the easiest pastas to make and can give you the confidence to make different pastas— Douglas

Gnocchi alla Ciociaria

Gnocchi alla Ciociaria

Gnocchi alla Ciociaria

Ingredients

  • 1 pound russet potatoes
  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 ounces pancetta, diced Finely chopped bacon works in a pinch
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 rib celery, finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch Italian parsley, finely chopped to yield 1/4 cup
  • 4 sweet Italian sausage links, removed from casing
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1 (16-ounce) can San Marzano tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon red chili flakes
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Freshly grated pecorino romano

Instructions

Place the whole potatoes in a saucepan with water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook at a low boil until they are soft, about 45 minutes. While still warm, peel the potatoes and pass them through a vegetable mill onto a clean pasta board.

The pasta sauce will take just about as long to cook as the gnocchi takes to make, so get the sauce started and bubbling away and then make the gnocchi.

For sauce…

In a 12 to 14-inch skillet, heat the olive oil over high heat until almost smoking. Add the pancetta, garlic, onion, celery, carrot, parsley and the sausage meat and cook over high heat until sausage and vegetables are browned. Add the red wine, let it evaporate, then add the tomatoes and the pepper flakes. Adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper and lower heat to a simmer. Let cook for 45 minutes.

For gnocchi…

Make a well in the center of the potatoes and sprinkle all over with the flour. Break the egg into the center of the well, add the salt, and, using a fork, stir into the flour and potatoes as if you were making pasta. Once the egg is mixed in, bring the dough together, kneading gently until a ball is formed. Knead gently another 4 minutes, until ball is dry to the touch.

Divide the dough into 2 large balls. Roll each ball into 3/4 inch-diameter ropes and cut the ropes into 1-inch-long pieces. Flick the pieces off of a fork or along the concave side of a cheese grater to score the sides. Drop the dough pieces into the boiling water and cook until they float to the surface, about 1 minute. 

Once the sauce is thickened to the proper consistency, cook the gnocchi f in the boiling water until they float aggressively. Drain the gnocchi and add to the simmering sauce. Toss very gently over heat 30 seconds to coat, then divide evenly among 4 warmed pasta bowls. Top with freshly grated pecorino and serve.