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The 7 Best Cheap Whiskeys Under $40 via Gear Patrol

April 1st, 2019 Comments off
Always looking for that next, great tasting, deal! — Douglas
 
Too often, whiskey lists are compilations of fancy, limited-run bottles that are either impossible to track down or simply too expensive – usually both. After all, when there’s rent to pay and mouths to feed, people can’t always slap down hundreds of dollars on a bottle of hooch, regardless of its age or collectability. And truth be told, you don’t have to. There are still great deals to be had on unique and delicious bourbons, single malts and even Japanese bottles if you know where to look. But seeking out undervalued whiskey is not without risk – there’s a lot of nasty stuff out there. So avoid the swill and check out these fine bottles that deliver maximum bang for under 40 bucks.
Read The 7 Best Cheap Whiskeys Under $40 via Gear Patrol





An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Cooking Books: Famous old receipts used a hundred years and more in the kitchens of the North and the South (1908) by Jacqueline Harrison Smith – 25 in a series

March 26th, 2019 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Famous old receipts used a hundred years and more in the kitchens of the North and the South (1908) by Jacqueline Harrison Smith – 25 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: Famous old receipts used a hundred years and more in the kitchens of the North and the South (1908) by Jacqueline Harrison Smith - 25 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Famous old receipts used a hundred years and more in the kitchens of the North and the South (1908) by Jacqueline Harrison Smith - 25 in a series

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


INTRODUCTION.

The title of this book by itself conveys so much that any intro- duction to the many good things told in its pages seems superfluous. It certainly should not require any urging to induce all who can to read, mark, learn and inwardly digest them.

“One hundred years ago and more” brings before us a delightful period in our country’s history, and recalls the generous, cordial feel- ings which prevailed among our ancestors — that ” open-handed spirit, irank and blythe, of ancient hospitality,” which made the homes of the New World all that a stranger could desire.

We may reconcile ourselves to the passing of ” the fugaceous hospitalities of the snuffbox ” as needing the powdered wig and three- cornered hat to justify them. What a genuine ring there is in the words of Washington, referring to Mount Vernon, when he said : ” T.et the hospitality of the house with respect to the poor be kept up; let no one go hungry away.” And the cordiality of Jefferson while living in Philadelphia is delightfully expressed in a letter to Richard Peters: “Call on me whenever you come to town, and if it should be about the hour of three, I shall rejoice the more. You will find a bad dinner, a good glass of wine, and a host thankful for your favour and desirous of encouraging repetitions of it, wathout number, form, or ceremony.”

It was a time when there was truly that ” hospitality sitting with gladness,” w-hich all the luxuries of the present day cannot supply.

Publication date 1908
Publisher Philadelphia : J. Winston
Digitizing sponsor Boston Public Library
Language English


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† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

The 5 Best Whiskeys for an Old Fashioned via MyDomaine

February 20th, 2019 Comments off
I have to say I totally agree with their top choice — Buffalo Trace. In a recent cross tasting I found to be the best whether sipping straight or mixing into a cocktail. In fact, it tastes so good, it almost seems wasted in a cocktail. — Douglas
 

Broadly acclaimed as the original cocktail, the old fashioned is a core element of any whiskey lover’s repertoire. Variations of the recipe date back to the Civil War era, with the name “old fashioned” attributed to the Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky. The fact that the cocktail was already called an “old fashioned” in 1881 certainly speaks to its old-school cred. To this day (as evidenced by its presence on the most mouthwatering cocktail menus), few recipes have made a bigger impact on craft-cocktail culture.

The drink is comprised of bourbon or whiskey and usually just a bit of sugar, bitters, and an orange peel to garnish. Although the recipe itself is simple, picking the perfect whiskey can be a challenge. There’s rye whiskey, Kentucky bourbon, and many more options to choose from. All are made in their own unique way and offer different flavors.

Read The 5 Best Whiskeys for an Old Fashioned via MyDomaine




An interesting link found among my daily reading

Tequila Old Fashioned Recipe via Garden & Gun

February 13th, 2019 Comments off
Even in the cocktail-forward South, tequila sometimes gets an unfair rep as the shot of choice for college kids, or something to hide beneath a margarita mix. But a fine tequila, such as Jalisco, Mexico’s Patrón Añejo, is aged in white oak barrels for twelve to fifteen months, and is a smooth, nuanced sipper. The oak imparts a warmth and depth reminiscent of bourbon. Just in time for the Mexican holiday Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead), swap in aged tequila for bourbon in a twist on an Old Fashioned.

 

Find more Old Fashioned Recipes in this book

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis – 24 in a series

February 10th, 2019 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis – 24 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: Simple Italian cookery (192) by Mabel Earl McGinnis - 24 in a series

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


Risotto with Ham

Cut into small pieces one ounce of raw ham, fat and lean. Chop up fine a small piece of onion, and put it with the ham into a frying-pan with one-half a table- spoon of butter. Fry slowly until the ham and onions are golden. Then add one-half cup of uncooked rice; when it has cooked for a few minutes, add twice its height of bouillon (or water), salt and pepper, a dash of nutmeg, and mix well and allow it to boil for twenty minutes over a good fire. Then take off the stove, add two tablespoons of butter and two tablespoons of Parmesan cheese grated; mix well and serve.


Publication date 1912
Publisher New York and London, Harper & brothers
Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation
Language English
 
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

Historical Cooking Books: Twenty-five cent dinners for families of six (1879) by Corson, Juliet – 23 in a series

January 27th, 2019 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Twenty-five cent dinners for families of six (1879) by Corson, Juliet – 23 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

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Twentyfivecentdi00corsrich 0008Twentyfivecentdi00corsrich 0009

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


PREFACE TO THE REVISED AND ENLARGED EDITION.

DURING the time that this little book has been a candidate for public favor, it has attained a success far beyond the expectations of its most sanguine advocates ; and in issuing this revised and enlarged edition the author returns her sincere thanks to both press and public, who have so substantially seconded her efforts for culinary reform. In this edition an additional chapter has been devoted to the preparation of fruit for dessert, withspecial reference to the needs of American housewives. Most American ladies prepare fruit for table use either by canning it, or making it into rich and expensive preserves; while both of these methods are palatable, and available for winter use, the receipts given in the closing chapter will provide a welcome variety for serving fresh fruits at the table, and will tend to increase the healthy consumption of those abundant and excellent domestic productions, while they cannot fail to decrease the deplorable prevalence of that objectionable national compound, the pie. Recent investigations concerning retail prices in different sections of the country confirm the author in the estimate of cost given in this work ; in certain localities some of the articles quoted are more expensive, while others are cheaper ; but the average is about equal.


Publication date 1879
Publisher New York, O. Judd Company
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

First Starbucks in Italy – Piazza Cordusio, Milano, Italy via Instagram

January 17th, 2019 Comments off

What do you want to see in Italy? Share in the comments!

First Starbucks in Italy - Piazza Cordusio, Milano, Italy via Instagram

First Starbucks in Italy – Piazza Cordusio, Milano, Italy

We Happened to be in Milan the day the Starbucks opened.

Didn’t go the first day as it was packed, but took some photos and video on day two.

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Learn more about Milan

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Bruschetta and Wine to start the meal via Instagram

January 15th, 2019 Comments off

What’s your favorite Italian Food? Share in the comments!

Bruschetta and Wine to start the meal via Instagram

Bruschetta and Wine to start the meal

Bio Solaire, Milano, Italia

From our September 2018 trip to see family and attend the SRN Conference. 

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Learn more about Italian Food with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Lakota Coffee, Columbia, Missouri via Instagram

January 15th, 2019 Comments off

What’s your favorite coffee drink? Share in the comments!

Lakota Coffee, Columbia, Missouri via Instagram

Lakota Coffee, Columbia, Missouri

My favorite spot to caffeinate and hang out when we are in Columbia for the Citizen Jane Film Festival. 

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Learn more about coffee with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Getting a “roast” on at Shortwave Coffee, Columbia, Missouri via Instagram

January 14th, 2019 Comments off