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Archive for the ‘COVID19’ Category

How to Take Interesting Photos in Uninteresting Places via Digital Photography School

May 29th, 2020 Comments off
Having spent the past several months traveling extensively to some pretty exciting places, coming back home to small-town suburbia was a rude awakening for me to say the least. I was so used to having interesting subjects – be it people, landscapes, flora and fauna – at my doorstep everyday. I didn’t have to think much about what I wanted to photograph, I could just step outside and find something new and interesting every time.
Read How to Take Interesting Photos in Uninteresting Places via Digital Photography School

The Art of Photography, 2nd Edition: A Personal Approach to Artistic Expression

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Home School: Free to Use and Reuse: Maps of Cities via Library of Congress Blog

May 27th, 2020 Comments off

Cities grow, adapt and change, like all living things. The Library’s map collections show this in all sorts of unexpected ways, offering a vision of days gone by, of what “normal” once looked like.  We present you with some fascinating glimpses of the cities of yesteryear in this edition of the Library’s Free to Use and Reuse sets of copyright-free images.

The good news about these, if you haven’t seen them before, is that they are yours for the taking — print them out, blow them up into huge posters, use them for laptop screensavers. It’s your choice. In the past few months, we’ve highlighted classic movie theaters, genealogy, maps of discovery and exploration and so on, but there are lots more.

Read Free to Use and Reuse: Maps of Cities via Library of Congress Blog


An interesting link found among my daily reading

‎99% Invisible: 401- The Natural Experiment via Apple Podcasts [Audio]

May 26th, 2020 Comments off
99% Invisible: 401- The Natural Experiment via Apple Podcasts [Audio]
In general, the coronavirus shutdowns have been terrible for academic research. Trips have been canceled, labs have shut down, and long-running experiments have been interrupted. But there are some researchers for whom the shutdowns have provided a unique opportunity—a whole new data set, a chance to gather new information, or to look at information in a new way. And so, this week, we’re bringing you stories very different academic fields, about researchers who are using this bizarre, tragic moment to learn something new about the world.

Home School: Virtual Art Galleries via Google Maps Mania

May 25th, 2020 Comments off

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the largest art gallery in the United States. It has over two million works of art in its permanent collection.

The Met 360° Project is a series of six 360° movies which allow you to explore the museum and some of its galleries. The videos include tours of the Great Hall, the Met Cloisters and the Charles Engelhard Court. As each video plays you can pan around 360°, just like you can in Google Maps Street View.

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Home School: What did Native Americans do during the Civil War? via History Matters on YouTube [History]

May 23rd, 2020 Comments off

Watch Home School: What did Native Americans do during the Civil War? via History Matters on YouTube

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Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

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Home School: The 500-year-old bones of African slaves tell a traumatic story via Ars Technica

May 23rd, 2020 Comments off

Archaeologists found the bones of three young African men in a 500-year-old mass grave in what is now Mexico City. The chemical makeup of their bones sheds light on their earlier lives in Africa, and forensic analysis reveals hard, painful lives and young deaths.

How the dead speak

Archaeologists unearthed the mass grave in 1992 while digging a new subway line in Mexico City. Five hundred years earlier, the site had been the grounds of the Hospital Real de San José de los Naturales. The Spanish colonizers had built the hospital to treat indigenous people—that’s what “los Naturales” means in Spanish—but these three men were African, not North or Central American. Their bones radiocarbon-dated to the 1500s CE, which makes them part of an important but often anonymous group of people: the first African people abducted in their homelands and brought across the Atlantic Ocean to European colonies in the Americas.

Read The 500-year-old bones of African slaves tell a traumatic story via Ars Technica


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Home School: Creative Photography Exercises to do at Home (video) via Digital Photography School

May 20th, 2020 Comments off
 
Already bored at home? Well, don’t you worry because the COOPH photographers do their best even during this extraordinary time to provide you with fresh ideas and inspiration. They put together a list of creative things you can shoot during your time at home. Equipment or props? They only used things that you should already have in your home, so you can start shooting right away!
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States Are Reopening: See How Coronavirus Cases Rise or Fall via Articles and Investigations – ProPublica

May 20th, 2020 Comments off

ProPublica is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up to receive our biggest stories as soon as they’re published.

Many states are lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions on social and business activity that were put in place to curb the spread of COVID-19. Questions linger, however, about whether some states meet criteria set by public health experts and the federal government for doing so. Experts are keeping a close eye on whether states that have reopened are seeing an uptick in cases or a worsening in other key metrics.

To give people context on state reopenings, and what happens afterward, we are tracking metrics derived from a set of guidelines published by the White House for states to achieve before loosening restrictions. Even if these criteria are met, without a vaccine, reopening may cause an increase in cases. What’s more, some states may meet all of the criteria and still have a high infection rate.

Home School: Who Named the United States? via History Matters on YouTube

May 17th, 2020 Comments off
 
The United States of America. The USA. America. The Land of the Free. These are just some of the names for that continental sized nation which Alaska wishes it could touch. You’ll be surprised to know that other names were considered for the new nation during the American Revolution against Britain and that a name wasn’t settled on until the Constitutional Congress. Until other ideas, like Columbia or Fredonia were proposed. So why did the Founding Fathers choose the name ‘United States of America’.

Moby-Dick Marathon: The Story Hour Series via New Bedford Whaling Museum

May 17th, 2020 Comments off
Moby-Dick Marathon: The Story Hour Series
 
Relive one of New Bedford Whaling Museum’s most beloved events with a twist! The annual Moby-Dick Marathon takes place each winter and runs for 25 consecutive hours. Melville aficionados, scholars, and others enter a lottery months in advance for their chance to be a part of the reading. In this re-imagined, virtual event, a past marathon will be released in nightly, hour-long segments. Get cozy as you listen or follow along from the comfort of your home.