Local Gardening Books…from A Gardener’s Notebook

Local Gardening Books…from A Gardener's Notebook

You need to find gardening books that speak to your geographic area, your urban vs rural balance, your wildlife — basically everything that defines the natural and relatively unchangeable aspects of your garden. It does little good to read about “banking” your roses for Winter if the temperature never drops below 60 degrees. Conversely, reading about harvesting tropical fruits like bananas and papayas when you are snowed in can only lead to frustration.

From A Gardener’s Notebook by Douglas E. Welch DouglasEWelch.com

Buy or Download a sample of From A Gardener’s Notebook via Amazon.com

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Previously from A Gardener’s Notebook:

Video: The pomegranates next door…from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Gardener's Notebook Artwork

The pomegranates next door
are ready to harvest
and hard to resist
might have to beg!

Video: The pomegranates next door...from A Gardener's Notebook

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


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“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Noted: Japanese maples and other choice acer, with Adam Wheeler of Broken Arrow via A Way to Garden

Japanese maples and other choice acer, with Adam Wheeler of Broken Arrow via A Way to Garden

Japanese maples and other choice acer, with Adam Wheeler of Broken Arrow via A Way to Garden

I HAVE A FOLIAGE THING, probably more so than for flowers, so no surprise that a genus of trees I’m particularly passionate about is Acer, or maple, and especially the so-called Japanese maples—which do technically flower, of course, but not in the obvious way a magnolia or dogwood might. I invited Adam Wheeler, Broken Arrow Nursery’s propagation and plant development manager, to my public-radio podcast to talk maples.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items

Noted: DIY on a Budget: $30 Mini Concrete Planters by Dalilah Arja via Gardenista

DIY on a Budget: $30 Mini Concrete Planters by Dalilah Arja via Gardenista

DIY on a Budget: $30 Mini Concrete Planters by Dalilah Arja via Gardenista

File this one under trial and error: I started the project with high hopes of making a 2-gallon cement planter that I could stock with a variety of succulents. But while struggling to free the large planter from its mold, I dropped it on the ground, rendering it into…concrete chunks. The good news is I still ended up with two adorable mini concrete pots.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items

Video: Sweet Potato Rootlings – A Gardener’s Notebook Minute

A Gardener's Notebook Artwork

Sweet potato rootlings

Checking in on the sweet potato rootlings which are just about ready for delivery to a neighbor.

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music:  “Groove Grovei” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License 

Please Like this video and/or subscribe to my channel on YouTube.

Your likes and subscriptions directly reflect how many other viewers are suggested this video.

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel

 


Enjoy this post? Consider a donation via PayPal to support more garden posts, podcasts and videos!

  

“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Video: In the garden…September 24, 2014: Bauhinia

A Gardener's Notebook Artwork

Learning more about this neighborhood bauhinia that I have started growing from seed.

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music:  “Whiskey on the Mississippi” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License 

Please Like this video and/or subscribe to my channel on YouTube.

Your likes and subscriptions directly reflect how many other viewers are suggested this video.

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel

 


Enjoy this post? Consider a donation via PayPal to support more garden posts, podcasts and videos!

  

“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Garden Decor: Twig Screen via Salvage Savvy

Twig Screen via Salvage Savvy

An amazing bit of repurposing from garden or woodlot scraps. This twig screen is amazing complicated and interesting and would serve as a great wall hanging or backdrop either indoors or out. Lit from the front it could also create some wonderful shadows on the ground or a wall behind it.

Twig Screen via Salvage Savvy 

Via Pinterest User Rosemary Raynes

More Adirondack Stick Style and Decor

 * a portion of each Amazon sales goes directly to support A Gardener’s Notebook
** some of these books may be available at your local library. Check it out!
 
Previously in Garden Decor:

Noted: Growing backyard mushrooms, with Michael Judd via A Way to Garden

Growing backyard mushrooms, with Michael Judd via A Way to Garden

Growing backyard mushrooms, with Michael Judd via A Way to Garden

I’VE CONFESSED BEFORE to a fascination with fungus–as in mushrooms—that sprout unexpectedly in the garden. Perhaps surprising is that I have never intentionally grown any edible mushrooms. Ecological and edible landscape designer Michael Judd, author of “Edible Landscaping With a Permaculture Twist” (win a copy!), joined me on radio from his Frederick, Maryland, homestead, to teach me how easy it is to cultivate edible mushrooms outdoors.  

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items

Noted: Grow a Beautiful Fall Garden in a Pot via Houzz

Grow a Beautiful Fall Garden in a Pot via Houzz

Traditional Landscape by Seattle Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Banyon Tree Design Studio

I don’t know about you, but where I live (USDA zone 6) it’s been a long, hot, dry summer. With triple-digit temperatures for most of the summer, my containers look worse for the wear.

I’m starting to dream of cooler temperatures, autumn colors and falling leaves. I’ve already started thinking about revamping my container gardens for the coming season, and I can’t wait to get my hands on some cool-weather plants to refresh the look (and my mood).

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items

Fall arrives with the Autumnal Equinox here in the Northern Hemisphere

As of 10:28EDT yesterday, August 22, 2014, Fall has officially arrives here in Los Angeles. Of course, our temperatures and lack of rain almost make a mockery of this seasonal arrival, but it is a process to note. if only to mark our progress from one season to the next. Los Angeles has 4 seasons, it is just that both Spring and Fall are only about 2 weeks long. At least that is my take on it.

Fall will happen, of course. I will start to smell it in the air. For me, there is a very particular smell — one of decomposing leaves, dampness and even here in LA the smell of woodsmoke in the air. Fall an sometimes linger, if our Winter rains are late to arrive. Leaves stay on the trees and the lack of rain causes the plants to continue drying rather than decomposing.

The plants and trees are already sensing the Equinox (latin for equal night), though. Leaves are turning. Seeds are being set and all of our native or near native plants have dried to a golden brown and slowly settle back into the soil. Like nature itself, I look forward to Fall and Winter both for its sense of renewal and for its sense of dormancy and relaxation. The heat of the Summer always saps me while the brisk air of Winter spurs me to be outdoors doing things. While I would never really consider moving back to my childhood home of Ohio and wallowing through mounds of snow of months, I think I still have more affinity towards that type of climate that Southern California.

An equinox occurs twice a year, around 20 March and 22 September. The word itself has several related definitions. The oldest meaning is the day when daytime and night are of approximately equal duration.[2] The word equinox comes from this definition, derived from the Latin aequus(equal) and nox (night). The equinox is not exactly the same as the day when period of daytime and night are of equal length for two reasons. Firstly, sunrise, which begins daytime, occurs when the top of the Sun‘s disk rises above the eastern horizon. At that instant, the disk’s center is still below the horizon. Secondly, Earth’s atmosphere refracts sunlight. As a result, an observer sees daylight before the first glimpse of the Sun’s disk above the horizon. To avoid this ambiguity, the word equilux is sometimes used to mean a day on which the periods of daylight and night are equal.[3][note 1] Times of sunset and sunrise vary with an observer’s location (longitude and latitude), so the dates when day and night are of exactly equal length likewise depend on location. — Wikipedia

More information on the Autumnal Equinox: