Photo: In the Sicilian Garden 2011

In the Sicilian garden 2011

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Interesting Plant: Camellia japonica ‘Anemoniflora’

Camellia japonica ‘Anemoniflora’

I first saw this plant via a BBC Gardeners World episode where they highlighted many different camellias. I only have one camellia bush here in the grade in a dark read color with a yellow center, but I see them throughout the neighborhood and in the various botanical gardens here in the Los Angeles area. Descanso Gardens, in nearby La Cañada Flintridge, has large camellia plantings, in fact. They are also named an “International Camellia Garden of Excellence” by the International Camellia Society.

Interesting Plant: Camellia japonica ‘Anemoniflora’

Photo: Hume Camellia Society

 Camellia japonica (the Japanese camellia) is one of the best known species of the genus Camellia. Sometimes called the Rose of winter,[1] it belongs to the Theaceae family. It is the official state flower of Alabama.

In the wild, it is found in mainland China (Shandong, east Zhejiang), Taiwan, southern Korea and southern Japan.[2] It grows in forests, at altitudes of around 300–1,100 metres (980–3,610 ft).[3]

Camellia japonica is a flowering tree or shrub, usually 1.5–6 metres (4.9–19.7 ft) tall, but occasionally up to 11 metres (36 ft) tall. Some cultivated varieties achieve a size of 72m² or more. The youngest branches are purplish-brown, becoming grayish-brown as they age. The alternate leathery leaves are dark green on the top side, paler on the underside, usually 5–11 centimetres (2.0–4.3 in) long by 2.5–6 centimetres (1.0–2.4 in) wide with a stalk (petiole) about 5–10 millimetres (0.2–0.4 in) long. The base of the leaf is pointed (cuneate), the margins are very finely toothed (serrulate) and the tip somewhat pointed.[3]

In the wild, flowering is between January and March. The flowers appear along the branches, particularly towards the ends, and have very short stems. They occur either alone or in pairs, and are 6–10 centimetres (2.4–3.9 in) across. There are about nine greenish bracteoles and sepals. Flowers of the wild species have six or seven rose or white petals, each 3–4.5 centimetres (1.2–1.8 in) long by 1.5–2.5 centimetres (0.6–1.0 in) wide; the innermost petals are joined at the base for up to a third of their length. (Cultivated forms often have more petals.) The numerous stamens are 2.5–3.5 centimetres (1.0–1.4 in) long, the outer whorl being joined at the base for up to 2.5 centimetres (1.0 in). The three-lobed style is about 3 centimetres (1.2 in) long.[3]

The fruit consists of a globe-shaped capsule with three compartments (locules), each with one or two large brown seeds with a diameter of 1–2 centimetres (0.4–0.8 in). Fruiting occurs in September to October in the wild.[3]

C. japonica leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of some Lepidoptera, such as The Engrailed (Ectropis crepuscularia). The Japanese white eye bird (Zosterops japonica) pollinates Camellia japonica.[4] – Wikipedia.org

More information on Camellia japonica:
 
Plants and Seeds:
 
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Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Lost and found… — from A Gardener’s Notebook with Douglas E. Welch

Lost and found… -- from A Gardener's Notebook with Douglas E. Welch

You can get lost in a garden that is no wider than a backyard, but also find yourself there.

From A Gardener’s Notebook by Douglas E. Welch DouglasEWelch.com

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Noted: A Red, Dwarf, Reblooming, Fragrant Magnolia via The Plant Hunter

A Red, Dwarf, Reblooming, Fragrant Magnolia via The Plant Hunter

A Red, Dwarf, Reblooming, Fragrant Magnolia via The Plant Hunter

At one time, Carolina allspice or sweetshrub (Calycanthus floridus) was a popular garden plant. This native shrub, which occurs naturally from Ohio to Florida, was prized for it dark, maroon-red, fragrant flowers that smell of banana bubblegum. It’s an adaptable, easy to grow shrub with glossy, aromatic leaves that smell like camphor when crushed. You can still find it growing in old city neighborhoods, in alleyways and around old farm houses that date back the late mid to late eighteen hundreds. 

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

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Summer in the Garden: Crosley Furniture Griffith Metal Chair

I am always keeping a eye out for decent products for my own garden — even if they are just for my wish list. Over the course of the next few weeks, I’ll be highlighting a series of products that might fit in my garden — or yours! — Douglas


Crosley Furniture Griffith Metal Chair

Summer in the Garden: Crosley Furniture Griffith Metal Chair

I fondly remember chairs like this at my grandmother’s house. They were typically gathered around the back stoop or in the shade of the garage where I would sit and watch my grandfather, father and uncle do woodworking, building various things, including the new cabinets for our kitchen. These same chairs were to be found on nearly every farm and porch I visited in our small town throughout my childhood and this seems to have etched them permanently into my memories.

 

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Previously in Summer in the Garden:

Garden Alphabet: Zinnia

Zinnia

Some more flowers from Francesca’s garden in Mascalucia, Sicily These zinnia grow in pots dotted about the patio and thrive. As you can see from the photos, the bees love them, too.

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Zinnia is a genus of 20 species of annual and perennial plants of the family Asteraceae. They are native to scrub and dry grassland in an area stretching from theSouthwestern United States to South America, with a centre of diversity in Mexico. Members of the genus are notable for their solitary long-stemmed flowers that come in a variety of bright colors. The genus name honours German botanist Johann Gottfried Zinn (1727–59).

Zinnias are annuals, shrubs, and sub-shrubs native to North America with one species extending to South America.[3] Most species have upright stems but some have a lax habit with spreading stems that mound over the surface of the ground. They typically range in height from 10 to 100 cm tall.[4] leaves are opposite and usually stalkless (sessile), with a shape ranging from linear to ovate, and pale to middle green in color. The flowers have a range of appearances, from a single row of petals, to a dome shape, with the colors white, chartreuse, yellow, orange, red, purple, and lilac.

Zinnia elegans, also known as Zinnia violacea, is the most familiar species, originally from Mexico and thus a warm–hot climate plant. Its leaves are lance-shaped and sandpapery in texture, and height ranges from 15 cm to 1 meter.

Zinnia angustifolia is another Mexican species. It has a low bushy plant habit, linear foliage, and more delicate flowers than Z. elegans – usually single, and in shades of yellow, orange or white. It is also more resistant to powdery mildew than Z. elegans, and hybrids between the two species have been raised which impart this resistance on plants intermediate in appearance between the two. The Profusion series, with both single and double-flowered components, is bred by Sakata of Japan, and is among the most well-known of this hybrid group.

Zinnias seem to be a favorite of butterflies, and many gardeners add zinnias specifically to attract them.[5][6] ]– Wikipedia

More information on Zinnia:

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Previously in Garden Alphabet:

Video: In the garden…July 31, 2014: Basil, lemons and strawberries

Agn artwork

We check in on the basil cuttings, our lemon tree and the strawberry pot. 

Video: In the garden...July 31, 2014: Basil, lemons and strawberries

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music: “The One” by the Woodshedders (http://musicalley.com)

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“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Garden Decor: H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

Again, more copper elements for the garden. Not sure what attracts me to copper, but it must be something deep within my psyche, as I always notice it wherever I go.

Garden Decor: H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

  • REAL COPPER not just a copper finish. Excellent drainage.
  • Mounting brackets allow you to mount under windows or on wooden decks.
  • Included brackets also make removal easy for planting and care.
  • Black Iron has a powder coat finish to protect against rusting
  • Designed and Manufactured by H Potter. Available in three sizes. 30″L x 8″D x 8″H, 36″L x 8″D x 8″H, 48″L x 8″D x 8″H

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Previously in Garden Decor:

H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

Flowering Now: Cactus Flower

Cactus Flower (Unknown)

My wife picked up this succulent planter at a garage sale somewhere over the years and we added some cacti and succulents to it over the years, so I truly have no idea the name of this cactus at all. It does bloom very prettily on occasion, though, so I thought I would share it as this week’s Flowering Now entry. If you have can identify the cactus, I would much appreciate it. Succulent identification is not one of my strong points, if not one of my weakest points, so I am sure most anyone else can do better than I with the identification. Thanks!

Flowering Now: Cactus Flower - 3

Flowering Now: Cactus Flower - 1

Photo: Douglas E. Welch, A Gardener’s Notebook

 
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Previously in Flowering Now:

Noted: Why Carrots Are Orange and Not Purple via The Kitchn

Why Carrots Are Orange and Not Purple via The Kitchn

Why Carrots Are Orange and Not Purple via The Kitchn

At the grocery store you probably see only two kinds of carrots: baby carrots, and the long ones with the green tops. Both of them are orange. If you’re lucky you might see a couple colorful carrots at your farmers market that are white, yellow, and purple (maybe).

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items