Succulent Container for Free – Make the most of your free garden finds!

IMG 3096

My wife picked up these 4 tiny succulents from the centerpieces at a recent college meeting. Never one to let anything go to waste, I grabbed an old container that happened to be unplanted, these four succulents and some decorative stone I had lying about and combined them into this pretty little container. I always figure that it is certainly worth a few minutes time to create something special, especially when the ingredients were all free. Never miss an opportunity to make something out of nothing for your garden.

I’ll post a short “In the garden…” video tomorrow about this mini project.

IMG 3097 IMG 3102

 Succulent Container Slideshow (9 photos)

Interesting Plant: Echeveria Agavoides

Echeveria Agavoides

This variegated echeveria would look beautiful in nearly any water wise garden. The striking color of the leaves immediately grabs visual interest.

Echeveria Agavoides Plants, Books and More at Amazon.com

Echeveria agavoides (red).jpg
Echeveria agavoides (red)” by TangopasoOwn work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Echeveria agavoides is a species of flowering plant in the Crassulaceae familynative to rocky areas of Mexico, notably the states of San Luis Potosí, Hidalgo, Guanajuato and Durango. 

E. agavoides is a small, succulent stemless plant, 8–12 cm (3–5 in) tall, with a rosette of leaves 7–15 cm (3–6 in) in diameter. It is often solitary, but old plants in good condition grow offsets. The leaves are green, triangular, thicker (6 mm) and more acute than the other echeverias – hence the explanation of their name agavoides, “looking like an agave”. Some varieties with bright light have reddish (or bronze) tips and some forms have slightly red to very red margins. The inflorescences in summer appear on slender, single-sided cymes up to 50 cm (20 in) long. The flowers are pink, orange or red, the petals tipped with dark yellow.[1]

As with most echeverias, E. agavoides fears moisture and prefers mineral soils, growing best in light and even direct sunshine, which aids flowering. In order to flower, plants need rest in the winter, without water and in a cold place – but not less than 5 °C (41 °F). In temperate regions they must be kept indoors during winter, but may be placed outside during the summer months.[1]

This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society‘s Award of Garden Merit.[3]

Many hybrids have been created to obtain more brightly colored flowers or leaves.

The easiest methods of propagation are leaf cuttings and division of older plants. —  Wikipedia

More information on Echeveria Agavoides:
* A portion of all sales directly support A Gardener’s Notebook
** Some of the books may be available at your local library. Check it out!
 

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Video: Aeonium – A Minute in the Garden 10 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

The first in a series of garden minutes from The Gardens at Lake Merritt in Oakland, California.

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

Aeonium (tree houseleek) is a genus of about 35 species of succulentsubtropical plants of the family Crassulaceae. The name comes from the ancient Greek “aionos” (ageless). While most of them are native to the Canary Islands, some are found in MadeiraMorocco, and in East Africa (for example in the Semien Mountains of Ethiopia).

The rosette leaves are on a basal stem. Low-growing Aeonium species are A. tabuliforme and A. smithii; large species include A. arboreumA. valverdense and A. holochrysum.

Aeonium are not frost-resistant. They are related to the genera SempervivumAichryson and Monanthes, which is easy to see from their similar flower and inflorescences. Recently, the genus Greenovia has been placed within Aeonium 

 Aeoniums require little water (irrigation every 15 days) and in winter watering can be reduced to up to two months to survive cold conditions. It needs sun or partial shade. In general the green aeoniums prefer some shade – the purple ones like full sun. They will not withstand frost and extreme temperatures. In the summer they must be outside for good growth, and fall safekeeping and care that the ambient temperature is below 10 º C. The aeonium does not require a particular soil but it must be free draining. In sandy soils compacted plant grows best. It grows well in direct ground or in pots. When the plant is located directly on the ground the plants need shelter from the direct sun (especially if they have been indoors for the winter) and frost or low winter temperatures.— Wikipedia.org

More information on the Aeonium:

Get this flower on a variety of products via RedBubble
Aeonium cardsAeonium toteAeonium mug

Photo: Raindrops in the Garden at The Gardens at Lake Merritt, Oakland, California

Raindrops in the Garden

Purchase this photo and others on a variety of products from my portfolio

Raindrops mugRaindrops toteRainsdrop cardRaindrops iphone

Video: In the garden short…May 7, 2015: The potatoes hit their stride and start appearing everywhere

In the garden short…May 7, 2015: The potatoes hit their stride and start appearing everywhere 

A quick check on our “pantry leftover” white potatoes. See how I created and planted these starts using sprouted potatoes from the kitchen in this video.

In the garden…April 18, 2015: Planting potatoes from pantry leftovers

and in this similar video from 2014…

In the garden…January 21, 2014: Planting potatoes, and leucojum flowers (Snowflakes)

 

Music: “Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License

Photo: In the neighborhood…Avocados are growing!

Avocados are growing

The avocados on our neighbor’s tree are starting to form. Anticipation begins!

Video: Iochroma – A Minute in the Garden 9 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

The first in a series of garden minutes from The Gardens at Lake Merritt in Oakland, California. 

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

Iochroma is a genus of about 34 species of shrubs and small trees found in the forests of South America. They range from Colombia to Argentina or when certain species are excluded (see below) from Colombia to Peru. Their hummingbird pollinated flowers are tubular or trumpet-shaped, and may be blue, purple, red, yellow, or white, becoming pulpy berries. The cupular calyx is inflated in some species. The leaves are alternate, simple, and entire.

Iochromas are cultivated as flowering ornamentals and in cooler zones (zones 7-8/9) make useful patio shrubs for summer display or conservatory plants. The majority are not frost hardy and must be overwintered under protection. In warmer zones (zones 9-10) they can be used as landscape plants. They are commonly trained as standards (topiary) to control their size and shape. Iochroma flowers attract hummingbirds (Americas only) and bees to gardens.

Like many plants in the Solanaceae, Iochroma species contain phytochemicals with potential pharmaceutical value but the genus has not been exhaustively studied in this respect.Iochroma fuchsioides is taken by the medicine men of the Kamsa Indians in the Colombian Andes for difficult diagnoses the unpleasant side effects lasting several days (Schultes & Hoffman 1992). A variety of withanolides (Alfonso et al. 1993) and hydroxycinnamic acid amides (Sattar et al. 1990) have been isolated from Iochroma species.

The family Solanaceae is further divided into subfamilies, tribes and subtribes. Iochroma is in the subtribe Iochrominae along with the genera AcnistusDunaliaEriolarynxSaracha, andVassobia— Wikipedia.org

More information on the Iochroma:
 

Lochroma iphoneLochroma toteLochroma cards
 
Get this flower on a variety of products via RedBubble

Photo: Purple Iochroma at The Gardens at Lake Merritt, Oakland, California

Purple Lochroma at The Gardens at Merritt Lake Oakland California  

Purchase this photo and others on a variety of products from my portfolio

Lochroma iphoneLochroma toteLochroma cards

Products: Ice Plant Flower — my photography on smartphone cases, cards, totes and more!

See all the products and options in this series

Iceplant iphoneIceplant ipad

iPhone/Smartphone Cases | iPad Cases

Iceplant pouch

Studio Pouch

Iceplant card

Cards and Postcards

Iceplant mugIceplant travel

Mug | Travel Mug

Iceplant posterIceplant print

Posters | Framed Prints

Iceplant toteIceplant throw

Tote Bags | Throw Pillows

This photo, and more, available on a variety of products from RedBubble. Order directly online.

See my entire portfolio on RedBubble

Video: Acanthus – A Minute in the Garden 8 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

Acanthus

Acanthus is a genus of about 30 species of flowering plants in the family Acanthaceae, native to tropical and warm temperate regions, with the highest species diversity in the Mediterranean Basin and Asia. Common names include Acanthus and Bear’s breeches. The generic name is derived from the Greek word ακανθος (acanthos), meaning “thorny.”[2]

The genus comprises herbaceous perennial plants, rarely subshrubs, with spiny leaves and flower spikes bearing white or purplish flowers. Size varies from 0.4 to 2 m (1.3 to 6.6 ft) in height. — Wikipedia.org

More information on the Acanthus:

 Acanthus printAcanthus toteAcanthus card
Get this flower on a variety of products via RedBubble