Photo: California Poppy Collage via #instagram and #layout

Using the new Layout app from Instagram to combine some photos into a collage. California Poppies (Eschscholzia californica) are part of our Springtime bloom here in Southern California.

California poppy collage

Two More Plant Ideas from Monrovia — Christmas Carol Aloe and Desert Rose Paddle Plant #sponsored

Thanks to Monrovia for sponsoring this series of posts. The opinions stated here are my own.

As I was looking for my new plants at the nursery and in the Monrovia online catalog, I came across many plants that attracted my attention in some way. I’ll be highlighting a few of the other plants that might eventually find a place in my garden. Here are my next two selections in this series.

Christmas Carol Aloe (Aloe hybrid ‘Christmas Carol’ P.P.A.F.)

christmas-carol-aloe

Shop.Monrovia.com | Direct Link

Aloes have always been interesting to me, but more so over the last several years. As mentioned before, drought-tolerant plants are the future for most Southern California gardens, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have lots of variety and lots of beauty, too.

A petite Aloe with festive color! Dark green succulent leaves feature deep crimson raised spots and are trimmed in bright red. Vibrant pink to reddish-orange flowers add to the show. This drought tolerant plant is a great selection for use in rock gardens, as a small scale groundcover, or in containers. – Monrovia

Desert Rose Paddle Plant (Kalanchoe thyrsiflora ‘Desert Rose’)

kalanchoe

Shop.Monrovia.com | Direct Link

While we are looking at succulents, this lovely kalanchoe would be another great addition to the garden. This multicolored succulent would look great alone or in combination with others of a similar shade. This might be something for a collection of containers lining a walkway or driveway.

Noted for its distinctive round foliage, this succulent has chalky blue-green leaves tinged with red. Color intensifies in full sun. Clusters of yellow flowers on spikes appear on mature plants. Provides dramatic color and texture in rock gardens or xeriscapes. Easily grown in containers, indoors or out. — Monrovia

Previously in this sponsored program:

Video: In the garden…March 23, 2015: Planting a new blueberry bush

Planting our new blueberry bush

 

LinkMonrovia Home and Garden Information 

LinkShop Online at Shop.Monrovia.com

Follow @MonroviaPlants on Twitter

 

Music: “Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License

Interesting Plant: Seaside Daisy, Beach Aster (Erigeron glaucus) via BeWaterWise (@bewaterwiseh2o)

Seaside Daisy, Beach Aster (Erigeron glaucus) via BeWaterWise.com 

A few months ago I was invited down the office of the Metropolitan Water District to meet a number of people involved in their BeWaterWise.com project to help reduce water usage in California. As part of their efforts, they focus on providing plant alternatives to water hungry lawns. Over the next several weeks, I will be highlighting some of their garden alternatives as part of this series. For more information on these plants and other water conservation ideas and programs, vist BeWaterWise.comFollow the MWD on Twitter at BeWaterWiseH2O — Douglas

Erigeron Glaucus.jpg
Erigeron Glaucus” by JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Another native Californian, this free-blooming plant has purple daisy-like flowers with yellow centers. It flowers in the spring and summer and grows in clumps about 1 foot high and 2 feet wide. It likes full sun or light shade and requires moderate water in warmer areas.. — BeWaterWise.com

Erigeron glaucus is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name seaside fleabanebeach aster, or seaside daisy.

This wildflower is native to the coastline of Oregon and California where it grows on beaches, coastal bluffs and dunes. This is a perennial daisy reaching heights between 5 and 30 centimetres (2.0 and 11.8 in) with branching, nodding stems which may be glandular and hairy to hairless. It grows from a stout rhizome and produces thick, firm, rounded to spoon-shaped leaves, sometimes with a few teeth along the edges, each two to 13 centimeters long.[1] Its stems bear inflorescences of one to 15 flower heads which are variable in size from one to over three centimeters wide. The centers contain golden yellow disc florets and the edges are fringed with ray florets which may be long or quite short, and are shades of deep blue and purple to nearly white. While typical habitats include coastal bluffs, one highly specialised plant association is found within the two Cupressus macrocarpa dominant forests in Monterey County, California– Wikipedia

More information on Seaside Daisy, Beach Aster (Erigeron glaucus):
Books from Amazon.com:

* A portion of all sales directly support A Gardener’s Notebook
** Some of the books may be available at your local library. Check it out!
 

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Video: In the garden…March 18, 2015: Re-planting the sweet potato bed

Our sweet potato cuttings go back into the ground to start growing as our summer heat arrives. Looking forward to another great harvest.

 


LinkMonrovia Home and Garden Information 

LinkShop Online at Shop.Monrovia.com

Follow @MonroviaPlants on Twitter

 

Music: “Whiskey on the Mississippi” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License

Two More Plant Ideas from Monrovia — Indian Hawthorne and Dwarf Bottlebrush

Thanks to Monrovia for sponsoring this series of posts. The opinions stated here are my own.

As I was looking for my new plants at the nursery and in the Monrovia online catalog, I came across many plants that attracted my attention in some way. I’ll be highlighting a few of the other plants that might eventually find a place in my garden. Here are my next two selections in this series.

Majestic Beauty® Indian Hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis x ‘Montic’)

rhaph-monrovia

Shop.Monrovia.com | Direct Link

I have some lovely Rhaphiolepis here in my garden, planted by the previous owners. They are a common, yet reliable and beautiful planting here in Southern California. Mine don’t seem to require much water, now that they are mature and established and that is always a great benefit here. They are covered with small pink flowers each Spring which then give way to dark purple to black berries a month or so later. I haven’t noticed any particular animal feeding on the berries although some quick research indicates they can be a food source for some birds.

Easy-to-grow evergreen shrub produces huge clusters of fragrant, pearl-pink flowers. Perfect for planting along driveways and parking medians where reflected heat is an issue. Useful as a background shrub, screen or small tree with single or multiple trunks. – Monrovia

Dwarf Bottlebrush (Callistemon citrinus ‘Little John’)

callistemon-monrovia

Shop.Monrovia.com | Direct Link

This Dwarf Callistemon was on the short list of plants to buy for this sponsorship as my wife is quite taken with them. Here in Southern California they are usually grown a large trees, which we don’t really have the space to add, but we recently saw these dwarf varieties used against a wall — almost like you would espalier fruit trees. That gave us some great ideas about how we might be able to use them here in our garden. This is one plant I will definitely keep in mind for future additions to the garden.

Blood red blooms cover the top of this dwarf grower for an extended season. Dense branches are covered with blue-green leaves. Versatile compact size is perfect for today’s smaller gardens. Evergreen.  — Monrovia

Previously in this sponsored program:

Morning in the garden office

A photo from my time I my garden “office” this morning made with Waterlogue app.

Morning  in the garden office — Douglas E. Welch

Morning in the garden office — Douglas E. Welch

Amazing and lovely timelapse videos of flowers by Thomas Blanchard

Thomas Blanchard gives us this lovely timelapse of flowers opening. It is always so amazing to be able to see things that happen on a timescale outside of our normal perception, especially when those things come from our gardens.

flower-timelapse

Flowers from Thomas Blanchard on Vimeo.

Interesting Plant: Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia) via BeWaterWise (@bewaterwiseh2o)

Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia)  via BeWaterWise.com 

A few months ago I was invited down the office of the Metropolitan Water District to meet a number of people involved in their BeWaterWise.com project to help reduce water usage in California. As part of their efforts, they focus on providing plant alternatives to water hungry lawns. Over the next several weeks, I will be highlighting some of their garden alternatives as part of this series. For more information on these plants and other water conservation ideas and programs, vist BeWaterWise.comFollow the MWD on Twitter at BeWaterWiseH2O — Douglas

Heteromeles arbutifolia 1.jpg
Heteromeles arbutifolia 1” by Stan Shebs. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Toyon is also known as Christmasberry or California Holly for its brilliant red berry clusters from November through January. It’s a large evergreen shrub, with thick, leathery, glossy green leaves 2 to 4 inches long. It has small white flowers in flattish clusters, which bloom June through July. Toyon requires full sun and can tolerate low moisture. It attracts birds. — BeWaterWise.com

 Heteromeles arbutifolia (/ˌhɛtɨrɵˈmlz ɑrˌbjuːtɨˈfliə/;[4] more commonly /hɛtəˈrɒməlz/ by Californian botanists), commonly known as toyon, is a common perennial shrub native to extreme southwest Oregon,[citation needed] California and Baja California.

Toyon is a prominent component of the coastal sage scrub plant community, and is a part of drought-adapted chaparral and mixed oak woodland habitats.[5] It is also known by the common names Christmas berry and California holly. Accordingly, “the abundance of this species in the hills above Los Angeles… gave rise to the name Hollywood.”[6]

It is the sole species of Heteromeles, but is closely related to the Asian genus Photinia.

Toyon typically grows from 2–5 m (rarely up to 10 m in shaded conditions) and has a rounded to irregular top. Its leaves are evergreen, alternate, sharply toothed, have short petioles, and are 5–10 cm in length and 2–4 cm wide. In the early summer it produces small white flowers 6–10 mm diameter in dense terminal corymbs.

The five petals are rounded. The fruit is a small pome,[7] 5–10 mm across, bright red and berry-like, produced in large quantities, maturing in the fall and persisting well into the winter. — Wikipedia

More information on California Lilac (Ceanothus)  :
Books from Amazon.com:

* A portion of all sales directly support A Gardener’s Notebook
** Some of the books may be available at your local library. Check it out!
 

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Video: In the garden…March 15, 2015: Setting out our new plants – Sponsored by #Monrovia

Thanks to Monrovia for sponsoring this series of posts. The opinions stated here are my own.


Today I finally got around to planting my new plants from Monrovia. I had a cold this week and this kept me out of the garden, but it only took a small effort to get the Dwarf New Zealand Tea Tree and California Buckwheat into their permanent locations.

For more information on the plants in this video, you can visit the Monrovia site directl . You can find links on this video and also on the associated blog post. Thanks for watching!

Until next time…keep on digging!

Thanks to Monrovia  for giving me this opportunity to try out some new plants. I can always use new things in my garden, especially those plants that are waterwise and help out in our drought conditions here in Southern California.

For more information, you can visit the Monrovia site directly. You can find links on this video and also on the associated blog post. Thanks for listening. For more information on A Gardener’s Notebook visit DouglasEWelch.com

Until next time…keep on digging!


LinkMonrovia Home and Garden Information 

LinkShop Online at Shop.Monrovia.com

Follow @MonroviaPlants on Twitter

 

Music: “Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License

Previously in this sponsored program: