In The Garden…New strawberry pots

A week or so ago we picked up 2 new strawberry pots form the nursery. While the strawberries in our containers have been doing well, those in the ground were languishing. We figured it was best to get the remaining plants into containers and retrofit the bed to make it a little better for whatever might be planted there later.

Strawberry pot 1

I would have liked to place a watering pipe down the center of these pots but didn’t have anything on hand. This helps to distribute the water better throughout the pot, but as sometimes happens, you don’t always have the proper supplies on hand when you need them..

Strawberry pot 2

For this pot, I transplanted all the existing in-ground strawberry plants first and then filled in the remainder of the growing ports with runners from our existing container garden. These runners only had a few roots, so I am not sure if they will take or not, but it was a way of making the best use of both the runners and the pot space.

Strawberry pot 3

Keeping all of our containers watered is a bit fo challenge here in Southern California. Even today we are experiencing an Autumn Santa Ana Wind which has raised the temperature to almost 100 degrees. These temperatures and the strong winds can quickly dry out any container, so we have had to water every day or risk losing both these new plantings and older ones.

Strawberry pot 4

As of today, there are a few healthy looking strawberry plants in the pots along with a few that probably won’t make it. These are most likely the poorly rooted runners mentioned above. I’ll cultivate any new runners from the existing containers, root them in separate pots and then move them here to fill in any holes.

20% Off Everything Today Including these Sunflower Days Totes, Mugs, Smartphone Cases and More!

20% Off Everything Today Including these Sunflower Days Totes, Mugs, Smartphone Cases and More!

20% Off Everything Today Including these Sunflower Days Totes, Mugs, Smartphone Cases and More!

20% Off Everything Today

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Befriend Bees via Sunset: Garden

Before a flower can set seed or form fruit, it needs to be pollinated. Though some plants are pollinated by bats, birds, butterflies, moths, and wasps, most of the work is done by bees.

Bees are in serious trouble, though. Their numbers are in sharp decline, mainly because of shrinking habitat. Fortunately, bees have some dedicated advocates like the Xerces Society. And home gardeners can help too. Here’s what you can do to promote a bee-friendly environment in your garden.

Read Befriend Bees via Sunset: Garden




An interesting link found among my daily reading

Rudbeckia in Fall Colors via Instagram

Rudbeckia in Fall Colors

Rudbeckia in Fall Colors

An amazing rudbeckia flower shines out in the Autumn sun. 

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Garden Decor: Today’s Coffee Break Reading at Farm Table via Instagram

Today’s Coffee Break Reading at Farm Table

Today’s Coffee Break Reading at Farm Table

I walked to the library to pick up this book and grab a coffee this afternoon. Farm Table provides a nice place to grab an Americano and snack on the way back (They have some nice full meals, too)

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Gomphrena ‘Pinball Purple’ via Instagram

Gomphrena ‘Pinball Purple’ via Instagram

Gomphrena ‘Pinball Purple’

Spotted at the nursery this weekend. Might find a place in my front garden.

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From Missouri Botanic Garden

Annual. Easily grown in average, well-drained soils in full sun. Although mature plants exhibit good drought resistance, plants grow best with regular moisture throughout the growing season. Extremely good heat tolerance. Sow seed directly in the garden after last frost date. Use ample amounts of seed since germination rate can be quite low. For earlier bloom, start seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost. Most nurseries carry plants in cell/six packs. Set seedlings or purchased plants out after last frost date. Pinch young plants to promote bushiness.



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Fall flower at the nursery via Instagram

Fall flower at the nursery

Fall flower at the nursery

I didn’t catch the name of this plant, but the Flower certainly caught my eye as I walked around the nursery this weekend. 

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In the garden…New Obelisk for the Clytostoma

Obelisk before

Finally — I know I use that word a lot — I was finally able to locate and install a new, steel frame,  obelisk so the clytostoma vine wasn’t flopping over itself with nothing to climb on. It used to cover a trellis that ran along my office windows, but that came down in disrepair years ago. I left one post for it to scramble on, but even that eventually collapsed from rot. So it just stood there, self-supporting on its thick lower vines and flopping over more and more.

Obelisk

At the nursery yesterday, though, we happened upon an obelisk that met all our needs. It was tall, at least 7 feet to give the vine some space to sprawl. It also had to be cheaper than the typical $100-$200 dollars I was seeing online and locally. For whatever reason, this steel frame, simple but elegant was only $50. Sold!

Obelisk after

I trimmed out some of the more sprawling vines, removed the remains of a stake that had probably been with the plant since it was put in the ground, and then set the obelisk over. With a little judicious pushing and pulling my wife and I got the plant situated. That said, the trunk vines are old, thick and a bit forceful. I will probably have to stake at least one side into the ground to counteract that natural pull towards the sun.

After top

I think it looks quite nice and it also provides some space for hanging some other decorative items. Now that it has some support it should flower much more and it can be trimmed back to the frame each year to keep it neat.

After closeup

If you can’t find the obelisk you want locally, Amazon has quite a few. It might, at least, give you some ideas of what you are after for your garden.


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Interesting Plant: Cupressus cashmeriana

Interesting Plant: Cupressus cashmeriana

I really like the weeping habit of this cypress. At around 40’ tall it is a bit too large for my garden but I could easily see it being a focal point of a larger garden. — Douglas

Interesting Plant: Cupressus cashmeriana

Cypress tag

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments! 

Cupressus cashmeriana (Bhutan cypress, Kashmir cypress, weeping cypress;[1] Dzongkha language: Tsenden) is a species of cypress native to the eastern Himalaya in Bhutan and adjacent areas of Arunachal Pradesh in northeastern India. It is also introduced in China and Nepal.[1] It grows at moderately high altitudes of 1,250–2,800 metres (4,100–9,190 ft).[2]

Cupressus cashmeriana is a medium-sized to large coniferous tree growing 20–45 metres (66–148 ft) tall, rarely much more, with a trunk up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) diameter. The foliage grows in strongly pendulous sprays of blue-green, very slender, flattened shoots. The leaves are scale-like, 1–2 mm long, up to 5 mm long on strong lead shoots; young trees up to about 5 years old have juvenile foliage with soft needle-like leaves 3–8 mm long.[2]

The seed cones are ovoid, 10–21 mm long and 10–19 mm broad, with 8–12 scales, dark green, maturing dark brown about 24 months after pollination. The cones open at maturity to shed the seed. The pollen cones are 3–5 mm long, and release pollen in early spring.

A tree of 95 metres (312 ft) tall has recently been reported,[3] but the measurements await verification. – Wikipedia

More information on Cupressus cashmeriana :

Learn more about California Natives:
 
 
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Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Worker Bee 🐝 via Instagram

Worker Bee 🐝 via Instagram

Worker Bee 🐝 

Spotted today, among many other bees and butterflies, at the nursery. 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!