Historical Garden Books: A dissertation on oriental gardening by Sir William Chambers (1773) – 46 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: A dissertation on oriental gardening by Sir William Chambers (1773) – 46 in a series

Historical Garden Books: A dissertation on oriental gardening by Sir William Chambers, ,  (1773) - 46 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: A dissertation on oriental gardening by Sir William Chambers, ,  (1773) - 46 in a series

Historical Garden Books: A dissertation on oriental gardening by Sir William Chambers, ,  (1773) - 46 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: A dissertation on oriental gardening by Sir William Chambers, ,  (1773) - 46 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

P R E F A C E

AMONGST the decorative arts, there is none of which the influence is so extensive as that of Gardening. The productions of other arts have their separate classes of admirers, who alone relish or set any great value upon them: to the rest of the world they are indifferent; sometimes disgusting. A building affords no pleasure to the generality of men, but what results from the grandeur of the object, or the value of its materials : nor doth a picture affect them, but by its resemblance to life : a thousand other beauties, of a higher kind, are lost upon them: for, in Architecture, in Painting, and indeed in most other arts, men must learn before they can admire; their pleasure keeps pace with their judgment : and it is only by knowing much, that they can be highly delighted.



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Captivating Cactus: Time to plant (cactus) via Botanical Bright on TicTok [Video]

Captivating Cactus: Time to plant (cactus) via Botanical Bright on TicTok [Video]

Follow Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents on Facebook

Announcing Our New Guide to Garden Shed Design via Gardenista

A garden shed should be a sanctuary. Your safe space. At its most modest, a shed is the little building in the backyard, preferably covered with vines, where you can slip off on your own to hang your hat on a hook, re-pot an overgrown scented geranium, and organize all your sharp-edged tools.
Read Announcing Our New Guide to Garden Shed Design – Gardenista via Gardenista



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Seed Catalogs: Money growers manual by Johnson & Stokes; (1892) – 35 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Money growers manual by Johnson & Stokes; (1892) – 35 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Money growers manual by Johnson & Stokes; (1892) - 35 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Money growers manual by Johnson & Stokes; (1892) - 35 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

HERE are reasons why sensible people should buy their seeds of JOHNSON & Stokes. More than one hundred thousand such people have found by experience what these reasons are ; but many thousands of new cus tomers, who are seeking such a house, ought to know, too.

Growing seeds of the right sort is a difficult business. It requires rare facilities and experience just to grow good seeds. But we undertake more than this. The best sort of a seed business must be carried on doubly, so to speak, — it must grow plants, and it must grow seeds. It must grow the plants first, to find out whether the seeds of those plants are “worth growing.

Few seed houses will take the trouble to do this. We make it a chief feature of our business. What we do is not merely to grow seeds : it is to grow the right seeds, from tested stocks. Our customers get not merely seeds that will grow : they get seeds that it will pay them to grow.


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

Gardening 101: Coleus via Gardenista

Coleus: Plectranthus scutellarioides
 
Is coleus a plant you have to learn to love? Garden trends ebb and flow—and bright, dramatically colored foliage can be an acquired taste. I used to dismiss these tropical plants because I thought their brightly tinged leaves screamed gaudiness and were unbelievably hard to mix with other flowers. No longer. Now I think of them as plant gems that can add a burst of dramatic color; whenever I spot them I snap them up for my clients’ container plantings.
Read Gardening 101: Coleus via Gardenista



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Dazzling Dahlias – 2 in a series – Dahlia ‘Contraste’ via Gardenia.net

Dahlia 'Contraste' via Gardenia.net
 
Dahlia ‘Contraste’ produces profuse and spectacular dark red flowers adorned with contrasting pure white tips. The fully double flowers, up to 8-9 in. wide (20-22 cm), are borne atop strong stems from summer to frost and provide an amazing focal point in the garden or in a vase. Bred in France as a cut flower, this dahlia grows up to 36 in. tall (90 cm) and is an excellent choice to create a lovely garden display or for showing.

Read Dahlia ‘Contraste’ via Gardenia.net



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

How To Use A Bulb Auger (And Plant Bulbs In Minutes) via The Impatient Gardener

I wish I had had one of these when I was planting my own bulbs. It is slow going with a trowel in hard soil but this could have made all the difference. — Douglas
 

Last spring Mr. Much More Patient looked out the window at our still-gray landscape and asked why we didn’t have more daffodils. They are a good bulb to grow here because no critters will touch them. Still, I don’t want to add too many more to the gardens, as keeping them healthy requires leaving the foliage standing to die back naturally, and I don’t love that look in my garden. (In fact I often cut off the leaves before I should, knowing full well this will affect their life span.) But we do have a lot of wooded areas that are quite bright in spring and would look lovely with some color. And I’d never have to worry about the foliage looking tatty. 

So I told Mr. Much More Patient we could have mass quantities of daffodils if he didn’t balk at the cost and would agree to help plant them.

And that’s how we ended up planting 400 daffodils this week.

Read How To Use A Bulb Auger (And Plant Bulbs In Minutes) Via The Impatient Gardener



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Garden Books: Detail des nouveaux jardins à la mode by Georges-Louis Le Rouge, Sir William Chambers (1776) – 45 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Detail des nouveaux jardins à la mode by Georges-Louis Le Rouge, Sir William Chambers (1776) – 45 in a series

Historical Garden Books: Detail des nouveaux jardins à la mode by Georges-Louis Le Rouge,  Sir William Chambers (1776) - 45 in a series

Historical Garden Books: Detail des nouveaux jardins à la mode by Georges-Louis Le Rouge,  Sir William Chambers (1776) - 45 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Leuchtenbergia principis / Agave cactus via CactGuy

Click through to see 2 additional pictures

Read Leuchtenbergia principis / Agave cactus via CactGuy



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Elements of a Japanese Garden via FineGardening

The art and craft of the Japanese garden continues to thrive today after well over 1,300 years in Japan and for the last 150 years in various points west and east. It is difficult to define one reason for the almost instant endearment of these beautiful spaces, but for me, it has always been the Japanese garden’s ability to capture the essence of the greater natural world as well as its ability to adapt to almost any type of site and topography. Most of us are only familiar with the Japanese garden in public-park settings, and while beautiful, these gardens would likely be far out of our range in terms of cost—and perhaps scale—to even be given a second thought as an option for our own homes. There are, however, elements of design within nearly all Japanese gardens that can be integrated into a non-Japanese garden with great success. The key is not to paint a Japanese face on your garden in an effort to make it look or feel authentically Japanese. Take cues, instead, from Japanese-gardening techniques to evoke the peace and tranquility that these gardens inspire. To do this, we will need to look closely at some of the elements of traditional Japanese-garden design.
Read Elements of a Japanese Garden via FineGardening



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading