Garden Decor: H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

Again, more copper elements for the garden. Not sure what attracts me to copper, but it must be something deep within my psyche, as I always notice it wherever I go.

Garden Decor: H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

  • REAL COPPER not just a copper finish. Excellent drainage.
  • Mounting brackets allow you to mount under windows or on wooden decks.
  • Included brackets also make removal easy for planting and care.
  • Black Iron has a powder coat finish to protect against rusting
  • Designed and Manufactured by H Potter. Available in three sizes. 30″L x 8″D x 8″H, 36″L x 8″D x 8″H, 48″L x 8″D x 8″H

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Previously in Garden Decor:

H Potter Copper Window Box Planter

Flowering Now: Cactus Flower

Cactus Flower (Unknown)

My wife picked up this succulent planter at a garage sale somewhere over the years and we added some cacti and succulents to it over the years, so I truly have no idea the name of this cactus at all. It does bloom very prettily on occasion, though, so I thought I would share it as this week’s Flowering Now entry. If you have can identify the cactus, I would much appreciate it. Succulent identification is not one of my strong points, if not one of my weakest points, so I am sure most anyone else can do better than I with the identification. Thanks!

Flowering Now: Cactus Flower - 3

Flowering Now: Cactus Flower - 1

Photo: Douglas E. Welch, A Gardener’s Notebook

 
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Noted: Why Carrots Are Orange and Not Purple via The Kitchn

Why Carrots Are Orange and Not Purple via The Kitchn

Why Carrots Are Orange and Not Purple via The Kitchn

At the grocery store you probably see only two kinds of carrots: baby carrots, and the long ones with the green tops. Both of them are orange. If you’re lucky you might see a couple colorful carrots at your farmers market that are white, yellow, and purple (maybe).

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Sharing beauty as well as food… — from A Gardener’s Notebook with Douglas E. Welch

 Sharing beauty

“While food stuffs like produce can fill a hungry stomach, you can also provide some food for the soul. Do you have more ornamental flowers than you can possibly display? Perhaps your local garden group can get together and build floral arrangements for a local senior center, hospice or hospital. Sharing the beauty of my garden always brings me happiness and so many of us have so much to share. You could even arrange a garden tour of you and your neighbors’ gardens for a small fee and donate the proceeds to charity.

From A Gardener’s Notebook by Douglas E. Welch DouglasEWelch.com

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Noted: Hidden Gardens of Los Angeles via Animalbytes

Hidden Gardens of Los Angeles via Animalbytes

Hidden Gardens of Los Angeles via Animalbytes

Here and there in the corners of the city, there are wonderful public gardens.

I’m spotlighting a few of them on The Earth Minute (theearthminute.com). Each profile offers a one-minute video of the location and details on parking, accessibility, and amenities.

The Malibu Legacy Park offers native plants, a host of birdlife, and mosaic sculptures of California wildlife.

Orcutt Ranch Park is a quiet stroll through California history–complete with lemons, adobe, and an ancient oak tree.

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Noted: Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds via Improvised Life

Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds via Improvised Life

Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds via Improvised Life

Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds

In addition to a cool shipping pallet table, we found another great DIY at Urban Garden Center: a concrete block planter (below). We’d seen images of them before like the one above that houses succulents and at this Pinterest devoted solely to concrete block gardens. The basic idea holds lots of possibilities, some rough, some curiously sleek.

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Summer in the Garden: Reclaim Metal Barrel Trolley

I am always keeping a eye out for decent products for my own garden — even if they are just for my wish list. Over the course of the next few weeks, I’ll be highlighting a series of products that might fit in my garden — or yours! — Douglas


Reclaim Metal Barrel Trolley

Summer in the Garden: Reclaim Metal Barrel Trolley

While I don’t think this wouldn’t quite fit my full-sized whiskey barrel, there are some other large containers that would benefit from being easily moved about the garden and patio. As you know, containers can get pretty darn heavy when filled with soil and plants and you don’t — or can’t — easily move them around. Our friends have a living Christmas tree they move in and out each holiday season and a trolley like this could be just the item for making that a bit easier to do, too.

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Garden Alphabet: Vinca

Vinca

These lovely Vinca flowers comes from the garden of our Sicilian family near Mascalucia, Francesca had several lovely pots of these flower scattered around the yard. This was her garden, close to the house and distinct from the more “productive” garden of fruit and nut trees and a large free-growing patch of basil behind the house.

Garden Alphabet: Vinca

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Vinca (/ˈvɪŋkə/;[2] Latinvincire “to bind, fetter”) is a genus of six species in the family Apocynaceae, native to Europe, northwest Africa and southwest Asia.[3][4][5] The English name periwinkle is shared with the related genus Catharanthus (and also with the common seashore molluscLittorina littorea). In India the plant is known as sadaphuli meaning “always flowering”.

Vinca plants are subshrubs or herbaceous, and have slender trailing stems 1–2 m (3–6 feet) long but not growing more than 20–70 cm (8-30 inches) above ground; the stems frequently take root where they touch the ground, enabling the plant to spread widely. The leaves are opposite, simple broad lanceolate to ovate, 1–9 cm (0.25–3.5 inches) long and 0.5–6 cm (0.25–2.25 inches) broad; they are evergreen in four species, but deciduous in the herbaceous V. herbacea, which dies back to the root system in winter.[6][7]

The flowers, produced through most of the year, are salverform (like those of Phlox), simple, 2.5–7 cm (1–3 inches) broad, with five usually violet (occasionally white) petals joined together at the base to form a tube. The fruit consists of a pair of divergentfollicles; a dry fruit which is dehiscent along one rupture site in order to release seeds.[6][7] 

There are at least 86 alkaloids extracted from plants in the Vinca genus.[12] The chemotherapy agent vincristine is extracted from Vinca rosea (current name Catharanthus roseus), and is used to treat someleukemiaslymphomas, and childhood cancers, as well as several other types of cancer and some non-cancerous conditions. Vinblastine is a chemical analogue of vincristine and is also used to treat various forms of cancer.[13] Dimeric alkaloids such as vincristine and vinblastine are produced by the coupling of smaller indole alkaloids such as vindoline and catharanthine.[14]– Wikipedia

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* A portion of each sales directly supports A Gardener’s Notebook
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Previously in Garden Alphabet:

Midsummer Book Sale — All My Kindle Books 99¢ each for the next 30 Days!

That’s right!

As a special Midsummer treat to all my loyal readers, listeners and viewers, all my books are now just 99¢ each for the next 30 days!

Offer expires August 24, 2014

For career-minded types, there is my original book, The High-Tech Career Handbook, Cultivating You Career Reputations and, for those looking to decide where to take their career, Career Compass: Finding Your Career North.

Social Media fans can check out Social Media Self Preservation and learn how to take advantage of social media without losing your mind.

Finally, fans of A Gardener’s Notebook might like my collection of gardening essays, From A Gardener’s Notebook.

Read the Kindle book using your Kindle, Computer or Mobile device!
 
 

Noted: A never-ending ocean of 4.5 million flowers in Japan via Gizmodo

A never-ending ocean of 4.5 million flowers in Japan via Gizmodo

A never-ending ocean of 4.5 million flowers in Japan via Gizmodo

The Hitachi Seaside Park is one of the most beautiful parks in the planet: A place where millions of flowers grow every year in the most amazing displays of colors imaginable. Here you can see about 4.5 million baby-blue nemophilas blossoming in April—but there’s more, much more.

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