Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company (1894) – 3 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company (1894) – 3 in a series

I was really struck by the color pages of this catalog. I didn’t think they went in for color much at this time (1894) and I would guess it had to be somewhat expensive for them to include that. I guess that speaks to the company’s success that they were able to afford it for those plants that really sold themselves with their color — in this case, sweet peas and nasturtiums. — Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a series

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SWEET PEA.

Sweet Pea and the Nasturtium each separately improved by the mixing or hybridization of distinct colors and qualities and the perpetuation of the new product, or in some cases by the seizing of accidental sprouts, now both take rank among the most valuable garden plants, not surpassed in brilliant effect by any biennials, while they both are within the easy culture of any one of the least gardening experience.

The Sweet Pea, as respects size, texture, diversity of colors, exquisite shades, phenomenal production of blooms, and exquisite perfiime, has, in the last few years, jumped to the first place among the sweetest of climbing plants. So productive is it that single plants have been known to have borne over looo sprays of flowers.

No praise can be too high for the Sweet Pea. It is the fashionable flower consequent upon its rare development in beauty, ranging froni deepest purple to pure white and, in perfume, fragrant as Mignonette.

It is in place everywhere, in bouquets, in vases, as masses on the lawn, as ribbons along paths, or trained as screens in the form of hedges, or clambering on trellises to hide unsightly objects.

It is the most useful and ornamental of all hardy annuals, growing best in a cool soil and most luxuriantly under conditions of rain or moisture.

In planting the seed it should be put into the soil in very early Spring, to secure an early development, as early, if not earlier, than the planting of garden peas.

If sown in rows, the trenches to receive the seeds should be marked out four inches deep and the seeds placed two inches apart, and covered at first -^rith only two inches of earth, the full covering being attained gradually.

The object of deep seeding is that the roots may be well down to resist drouth. Planted in single rows, one ounce of Sweet Peas will seed forty feet, but for eff’ective purposes, one ounce should be allowed to every twenty feet or even less.

More information on this catalog:

Publication date 19uu
Publisher Bristol, PA Bloomsdale, PA Baltimore, MD New Freedom, PA : D. Landreth Seed Company
Digitizing sponsor IMLS
Contributor New York Botanical Garden, LuEsther T. Mertz Library
Language English
Volume 1894 D. Landreth Seed Company
 

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Garden Decor: Copper-esque Planters via Bower Power

Garden Decor: Copper-esque Planters via Bower Power

I had shared these planters with my Insta-friends but I need to show you guys how to do this because they are SO beautiful!  They are the perfect amount of fall and look great with mums.  And if your planter has a little texture to them, it really pops.  The fun part is that they are easier than you think!

First start off with your giant planter.  Mine were discolored and even after scrubbing them, they still sported green areas and even some darker splotches where the color was fading.  Time for a makeover!

Read Copper-esque Planters via Bower Power


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Alien looking new growth on prickly pear (opuntia) start via Instagram

Alien looking new growth on prickly pear (opuntia) start via Instagram

Alien looking new growth on prickly pear (opuntia) start

This is one of 4 paddles I harvested a year or so ago. All four are now growing strongly, but this was the last one to show new growth. They are all ready to be planted out in the garden now. 

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Flowering Now: An interesting geranium in the garden this morning via Instagram

Flowering Now: An interesting geranium in the garden this morning via Instagram

Flowering Now: An interesting geranium in the garden this morning

This geranium came from a broken shoot my wife found on the street one day and has grown into a lovely plant. It is quite different from a more typical geranium with these small, thin, petals on its flowers. 

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Historical Garden Books: Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) – 12 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) – 12 in a Series

A bound collection of this monthly newsletter complete with Index.

Historical Garden Books:  Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) - 12 in a SeriesPopulargardening4188unse 0011

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AN

ILLUSTRATED PERIODICAL

DEVOTED TO

Horticulture in all its Branches.

CONDUCTED BY

Elias A. Long, Author of “ Ornamental Gardening for Americans
“ The Home Florist,” Etc.,

Volume 4, 1888=89.

BUFFALO, N. Y.:

Popular Gardening Publishing Co.

The Apple Crop and Foreign Markets. A yield of Apples rather above the average in this country and especially in the fruit sections of Western New York, Canada, and Nova Scotia is at this date a certainty, and corresponds with the fruit crop report published in our July issue. But with a large crop the market outlook is per- haps brighter for steady prices, than for some years past. This is due partly to the growing Western demand in our own country; but chiefly because of the almost entire failure of Apples in Great Britain, with but a light crop on the Continent. In England, this is doubtless caused by the unprecedently cold, rainy season, together with the previous season’s drought, con- tributing to fearful insect ravages this year. The consequence to our own fruit growers must be that all the first grade of winter Apples can be disposed of at good figures, the quotations of September 10, giving prices at Liverpool, on the first shipments as, per barrel: Kings, $1.85 to $5.75; Blush, $4.35 to $5.08; Baldwins, $2.88 to $3.40; Greenings, $2.40 to $2.76. These prices were for sound fruit of good size, well packed and graded.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1885
Publisher Buffalo, N.Y. : Popular Gardening Pub. Co
Digitizing sponsor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Alternates
Language English
Volume v.4(1888-1889)

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Start A New Beekeeping/Garden Journal these “Bees Take A Drink” Hardcover Journals and Much More!

Start A New Beekeeping/Garden Journal these “Bees Take A Drink” Hardcover Journals and Much More!

Start A New Beekeeping/Garden Journal these “Bees Take A Drink” Hardcover Journals and Much More!

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Historical Seed Catalogs: Barteldes Seed Catalog (1919) – 2 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: Barteldes Seed Catalog (1919) – 2 in a series

I find the “Help Feed Europe” Ad and the opening introduction to the catalog to be a dramatic look at what it was like 99 years ago when the Armistice was only a few months old and men were starting to return from Europe after the war. It shows just how serious the damage was to Europe and how many millions were starving after nearly 5 years of brutal, global, total war. — Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: Barteldes Seed Catalog (1919) - 2 in a seriesBarteldesSeed00Bart 0002

Historical Seed Catalogs: Barteldes Seed Catalog (1919) - 2 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Barteldes Seed Catalog (1919) - 2 in a series

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The war has been brought to a glorious end, but the need for food has increased instead of decreased. We must send food not only to our Allies but also to millions of other war stricken people. As this page goes to press, Mr. Hoover is in Europe getting first hand information and making plans to help these starving millions. When he comes back he will no doubt tell us that the need is much greater than anyone had realized.

Every one of us must do our part — not only in saving food, but, what is of greater importance, in producing it. Every farm should be worked to the limit and every garden should be made to produce to the utmost.

Plant vegetables that will save meat, transportation and wheat.

Gardening, which cuts your grocery bills in half, gives you healthful exercise during the long twilight evenings, and provides fresh vegetables for your table during the summer and a generous supply for winter storage, is surely a pleasant and easy way of aiding the war stricken people of Europe.

Plant every acre and every foot of ground but above all plant only seed that you know to be of high quality. To risk your labor and your land to seeds of unknown quality is the worst kind of folly. You may save a few cents in the cost of the seed, but on the other hand you may not only lose your crops, but also introduce on your farm a host of vicious weeds.

The farmers and gardeners all through the Middle West have been planting Barteldes Seeds for over a half century and they know they can be depended on.

YOU TAKE NO RISK IN BUYING FROM US. All orders are taken and shipments made subject to your being satisfied with the seeds on arrival. When the seeds arrive you can examine them, test them, and if for any reason you are not satisfied, and will notify us within five days of receipt of same, we stand ready to take the seeds off of your hands and refund your money. It is well known, however, that seeds of the best quality often fail through various causes beyond human control, and we therefore, give no warranty, expressed or implied, as to description, quality, productiveness, or any other matter, of any seeds, bulbs or plants we send out, and we will not be in any way responsible for the crop. If the purchaser does not accept the goods on these terms they are at once to be returned.

PRICES. All ptices quoted in this catalog are subject to market changes but as a rule the prices of garden seeds hold goot^uring the season.

PINK LIST. Prices of field seeds change constantly and we therefore issue our “Pink List,” giving current prices of field seeds. We issue this frequently and are always glad to send it when asked to do so. A postal card will bring it to you.

In ordering from the Pink List be sure to note the date at the top which shows when the list was printed. If the list you have is an old one send for a new one to get the correct prices. A postal card will bring it to you.

In case the price is different from what you figure on in your order we will, unless you give us instructions, use our best judgment as to whether to send you more or less seeds, or perhaps write you in case the difference is considerable. You will in all cases get the full value of your money.

SEEDS BY MAIL. We will send postpaid all Garden and Flower Seeds at the prices given in the following list, with the exception of heavy seeds, as Beans, Peas, Corn, Clover, Grain, Grass Seeds and Onion Sets. If you order these by mail, be sure to add postage. 

More information on this catalog:

Publication date 18uu
Publisher Lawrence, Kan. : Barteldes Seed Co
Digitizing sponsor IMLS
Contributor New York Botanical Garden, LuEsther T. Mertz Library
Language English
Volume 1919 Barteldes Seeds

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A Gardener’s Notebook: Scorch and sunburn in the garden – Lots of damage in the neighborhood – August 9, 2018

A few weeks ago, here in the San Fernando Valley, we set an all-time high temperature of 117º. While we are used to a few days of warm temperatures each Summer, this is by far the hottest and longest patch I, and most of the California Natives, have ever experienced. As I walked around the neighborhood over the next several weeks I began spotting some major shrub and tree damage from this intensive heat. In my 30+ years in California,  I have only ever seen damage like this after several nights of freezing temperatures (which do happen quite regularly here in the Valley).

One of the first things I spotted was our neighbor’s young Chinese elm. These are popular street trees here in the Valley and are quite hardy. I have a 40+-year-old specimen in my own garden. This tree, though, without any surrounding shade, standing in the middle of an open lawn seemed to have taken a dramatic hit.

Chinese elm 1

I might be a bit hard to see in this picture, but the entire crown is brown although there are green leaves still seen near the top of the trunk. I am guessing the rest of the tree-shaded this portion just enough to protect it.

Chinese elm 2

In this closeup, you can see the remaining green leaves against the dead, brown leaves of the upper story.

Next, and probably most dramatically hit was our neighbor’s apple trees. These trees are designed for our warmer climate and seem to grow and fruit quite well, but the heat was simply too much for one of them. There are two trees, one to the north and one to south a small distance apart. For whatever the reason, the Northern tree was nearly destroyed, while the Southern tree only showed some areas of scorch.

Apple tree

From a distance, it appears that the entire tree is dead, but again, like the Elm tree across the street, there is still some life remaining below.

Apple=tree closeup

Even though this tree had flowered normally in the Spring, it seemed to be attempting to flower again, perhaps thinking it was about to expire. I had planned on helping the neighbor prune and maintain these trees in the future, as they don’t really like the apples and don’t pay them much attention. Now it looks like I will need to spend some timing doing some removal of the dead limbs and seeing what is salvageable. I am guessing this tree will survive, but it will take several years before it is back to the size it once was.

Finally, I have 2 redwoods on my property and there is a street nearby that is lined with them — probably a feature of the original developers planned. Almost universally, the redwoods have scorched those sides that received the most sun and, most especially, the strong afternoon sun on the hottest days of this heat wave. The redwood in my front garden looked fine until I was walking home from the library one day. It was only when I saw it while approaching from the north that I noticed the extensive scorching of the leaves. The back garden redwood was less scorched probably as it is partially shaded by surrounding trees and didn’t receive the full dose of sun and heat. The nearby street that is lined with redwoods looked even worse. Those trees are older and taller than mine so they received almost no shade and were scorched from the top nearly the bottom on their northeastern sides.

Redwood

Redwoods are a northern, coastal, tree. They will never grow to the gigantic size of their northern cousins, but they normally do quite well here in Southern California. High temperatures like this, though, could cause more than a few of them to die over the next couple of months, especially if we do not receive a typical amount of rain in the Winter.

The saddest thing is there is not much we can do to protect these trees in the future. We can give them extra watering, placed deep among the roots to lessen the stress, but if climate change continues at this current pace our San Fernando Valley gardens might come to more resemble those in the true desert areas of California such as Palm Springs.

Learn more about scorch, sunburn and heat dress wi these articles

Garden Decor: Shrubs or Topiary Frames with Sheep Faces

I’d love to find the original source for this idea, but I can’t seem to locate it, even after a bit of time searching around.

If anyone knows where this comes from, please pass it along.

I think these sheep are absolutely adorable and would look great amid almost any garden. I suppose if you could find the heads, you could just embed them in any roundish shrub to for a similar effect. I first thought these were actually topiary frames, but after looking at them for a while it appears that are just sheep-shaped boxwood or other tightly clipped shrub.

I’ll definitely stash this idea away for future use.

Garden Decor: Shrubs or Topiary Frames with Sheep Faces

Historical Garden Books: The garden primer : a practical handbook on the elements of gardening for beginners by Grace Tabor; Gardner Callahan Teall (1910)- 11 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: The garden primer : a practical handbook on the elements of gardening for beginners
by Grace Tabor; Gardner Callahan Teall (1910)- 11 in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  The garden primer : a practical handbook on the elements of gardening for beginners by Grace Tabor; Gardner Callahan Teall (1910)- 11 in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  The garden primer : a practical handbook on the elements of gardening for beginners by Grace Tabor; Gardner Callahan Teall (1910)- 11 in a Series

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PREFACE

IT is the purpose of this little book to set forth in the most direct form, but without technical- ities, the fundamental principles of amateur gardening in America. Unlike the greater number of the volumes one finds in garden literature it presupposes no knowl- edge of the subject, rather aiming to satisfy those who now for the first time wish to know how to make things grow, and are in need of a trustworthy guide to going about it. The tables included have been prepared with the greatest care, and the entire matter appearing herein should prove applicable to conditions throughout every state.

More information on this book:

Publication date c1910
Topics Gardening
Publisher Philadelphia, Pa. : John C. Winston
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 

Learn more about gardening history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
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