Noted: Hidden Gardens of Los Angeles via Animalbytes

Hidden Gardens of Los Angeles via Animalbytes

Hidden Gardens of Los Angeles via Animalbytes

Here and there in the corners of the city, there are wonderful public gardens.

I’m spotlighting a few of them on The Earth Minute (theearthminute.com). Each profile offers a one-minute video of the location and details on parking, accessibility, and amenities.

The Malibu Legacy Park offers native plants, a host of birdlife, and mosaic sculptures of California wildlife.

Orcutt Ranch Park is a quiet stroll through California history–complete with lemons, adobe, and an ancient oak tree.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts.

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Noted: Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds via Improvised Life

Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds via Improvised Life

Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds via Improvised Life

Concrete Block Planters And Raised Beds

In addition to a cool shipping pallet table, we found another great DIY at Urban Garden Center: a concrete block planter (below). We’d seen images of them before like the one above that houses succulents and at this Pinterest devoted solely to concrete block gardens. The basic idea holds lots of possibilities, some rough, some curiously sleek.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

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Summer in the Garden: Reclaim Metal Barrel Trolley

I am always keeping a eye out for decent products for my own garden — even if they are just for my wish list. Over the course of the next few weeks, I’ll be highlighting a series of products that might fit in my garden — or yours! — Douglas


Reclaim Metal Barrel Trolley

Summer in the Garden: Reclaim Metal Barrel Trolley

While I don’t think this wouldn’t quite fit my full-sized whiskey barrel, there are some other large containers that would benefit from being easily moved about the garden and patio. As you know, containers can get pretty darn heavy when filled with soil and plants and you don’t — or can’t — easily move them around. Our friends have a living Christmas tree they move in and out each holiday season and a trolley like this could be just the item for making that a bit easier to do, too.

More plant dollies, trolleys and tools from Amazon.com

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs

Previously in Summer in the Garden:

Garden Alphabet: Vinca

Vinca

These lovely Vinca flowers comes from the garden of our Sicilian family near Mascalucia, Francesca had several lovely pots of these flower scattered around the yard. This was her garden, close to the house and distinct from the more “productive” garden of fruit and nut trees and a large free-growing patch of basil behind the house.

Garden Alphabet: Vinca

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Vinca (/ˈvɪŋkə/;[2] Latinvincire “to bind, fetter”) is a genus of six species in the family Apocynaceae, native to Europe, northwest Africa and southwest Asia.[3][4][5] The English name periwinkle is shared with the related genus Catharanthus (and also with the common seashore molluscLittorina littorea). In India the plant is known as sadaphuli meaning “always flowering”.

Vinca plants are subshrubs or herbaceous, and have slender trailing stems 1–2 m (3–6 feet) long but not growing more than 20–70 cm (8-30 inches) above ground; the stems frequently take root where they touch the ground, enabling the plant to spread widely. The leaves are opposite, simple broad lanceolate to ovate, 1–9 cm (0.25–3.5 inches) long and 0.5–6 cm (0.25–2.25 inches) broad; they are evergreen in four species, but deciduous in the herbaceous V. herbacea, which dies back to the root system in winter.[6][7]

The flowers, produced through most of the year, are salverform (like those of Phlox), simple, 2.5–7 cm (1–3 inches) broad, with five usually violet (occasionally white) petals joined together at the base to form a tube. The fruit consists of a pair of divergentfollicles; a dry fruit which is dehiscent along one rupture site in order to release seeds.[6][7] 

There are at least 86 alkaloids extracted from plants in the Vinca genus.[12] The chemotherapy agent vincristine is extracted from Vinca rosea (current name Catharanthus roseus), and is used to treat someleukemiaslymphomas, and childhood cancers, as well as several other types of cancer and some non-cancerous conditions. Vinblastine is a chemical analogue of vincristine and is also used to treat various forms of cancer.[13] Dimeric alkaloids such as vincristine and vinblastine are produced by the coupling of smaller indole alkaloids such as vindoline and catharanthine.[14]– Wikipedia

More information on Honey bees:

* A portion of each sales directly supports A Gardener’s Notebook
** These books and others may be available in your local library. Check it out!
Previously in Garden Alphabet:

Midsummer Book Sale — All My Kindle Books 99¢ each for the next 30 Days!

That’s right!

As a special Midsummer treat to all my loyal readers, listeners and viewers, all my books are now just 99¢ each for the next 30 days!

Offer expires August 24, 2014

For career-minded types, there is my original book, The High-Tech Career Handbook, Cultivating You Career Reputations and, for those looking to decide where to take their career, Career Compass: Finding Your Career North.

Social Media fans can check out Social Media Self Preservation and learn how to take advantage of social media without losing your mind.

Finally, fans of A Gardener’s Notebook might like my collection of gardening essays, From A Gardener’s Notebook.

Read the Kindle book using your Kindle, Computer or Mobile device!
 
 

Noted: A never-ending ocean of 4.5 million flowers in Japan via Gizmodo

A never-ending ocean of 4.5 million flowers in Japan via Gizmodo

A never-ending ocean of 4.5 million flowers in Japan via Gizmodo

The Hitachi Seaside Park is one of the most beautiful parks in the planet: A place where millions of flowers grow every year in the most amazing displays of colors imaginable. Here you can see about 4.5 million baby-blue nemophilas blossoming in April—but there’s more, much more.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts.

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Noted: Great Design Plant: Try California Wild Grape for Interest All Year via Houzz

Great Design Plant: Try California Wild Grape for Interest All Year via Houzz  

Landscape by Other Metro Garden & Landscape Supplies Las Pilitas Nursery

California wild grape is known best for its sensational fall colors, but it is much more than a one-season plant. In spring its silvery leaves and tiny buds emerge from bare vines. In summer the lush foliage with ripening fruit will conceal that undesirable chain-link fence. And in winter it reveals its most interesting feature — its gnarled and peeling vine branches. California wild grape is truly a four-season plant.

As with many vines, this one can grow fast and furiously. Pruning in winter keeps it manageable and lovely. Use it to quickly cover a fence, an arbor or a wall; it can even be used as a ground cover. It works in many situations — wet or dry soil, sun or partial shade, clay or sand — and makes a charming statement throughout the year.

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs


“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items

Noted: Cheap thrills: my must-have budget garden tools via A Way to Garden

Cheap thrills: my must-have budget garden tools via A Way to Garden

Cheap thrills: my must-have budget garden tools via A Way to Garden

I LOVE FINE GARDEN TOOLS: My edger that has lasted more than 25 years with no signs of wear; my stainless border spade; the long-reach telescoping pruners with precision snipping power from a distance. But I also pack my tool tote with cheap stuff—some under $10—that I couldn’t live without. Things like these:

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Some of my favorite gardening tools

Some of my favorite tools

Find more garden tools on Amazon.com

Garden Decor: Greenhouse scenes and decor from Garden Gallery

Greenhouse scenes and decor from Garden Gallery

A greenhouse scene I would love to have in my own garden.

Garden Decor: Greenhouse scenes and decor from Garden Gallery

Discovered via Garden Gallery on Tumblr

Greenhouse items of all sorts from Amazon.com

 * a portion of each Amazon sales goes directly to support A Gardener’s Notebook
** some of these books may be available at your local library. Check it out!
 
Previously in Garden Decor:

Video: First Impressions of the Parrot Flower Power – Wireless Indoor/Outdoor Bluetooth Smart Plant Sensor

Agn artwork

Video: First Impressions of the Parrot Flower Power - Wireless Indoor/Outdoor Bluetooth Smart Plant Sensor

I take a look at the new Parrot Flower Power – Wireless Indoor/Outdoor Bluetooth Smart Plant Sensor which I received for free as part of a Klout Perk a few weeks ago. I’ve had it in the garden, monitoring an avocado seedling and gather data on water, fertilizer, sunlight and temperature using the iOS app on my iPhone.

 

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music: “The One” by the Woodshedders (http://musicalley.com)

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“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons.