Photo: Garden planning for tomorrow via #instagram

Sitting on the couch this evening watching Gardener’s World and Beechgrove Garden.  

Video: Gerbera Daisy A Minute in the Garden 5 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

Flowering Now: Fortnight Lily (Dietes)

Flowering Now: Fortnight Lily (Dietes)

Fortnight lily

Photo: Douglas E. Welch, A Gardener’s Notebook


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A ubiquitous landscape plant here in Southern California, much abused and ill-pruned, but they do produce these interesting and beautiful flowers on occasion. Unfortunately, it also self-seeds wildly, so best to prune off any seed heads before they mature.

Dietes is a genus of rhizomatous plants of the family Iridaceae, first described as a genus in 1866. Common names include wood irisFortnight lilyAfrican irisJapanese iris and Butterfly iris, each of which may be used differently in different regions for one or more of the six species within the genus.

Most species are native to southern and central Africa, with one (Dietes robinsoniana) native to Lord Howe Island off the coast of Australia. A few species have become naturalized in other parts of the world.[1]

These plants were formerly placed in the genus Moraea, but were reclassified because they are rhizomatous. Like Moraea, they differ from Iris in having flowers with six free tepals that are not joined into a tube at their bases.

Some references mention the species Dietes vegeta or D. vegeta variegata, springing from some confusion with Moraea vegata (which grows from a corm, not a rhizome). The name D. vegetais commonly misapplied to both D. grandiflora or D. iridioides.

The genus name is derived from the Greek words di-, meaning “two”, and etes, meaning “affinities”.[2] – Wikipedia.org

More information on Fortnight Lily (Dietes):

 

Previously in Flowering Now:

Video: Wind chimes – A Minute in the Garden #4 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

Photo: Amaryllis in the garden via #instagram

One of the amaryllis currently blooming in the garden.

Amaryllis

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Video: Trees in the breeze – A Minute in the Garden #3 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

Video: In the garden…April 7, 2015: Planting sweet peas

In the garden…March 31, 2015: Gathering onion seeds 

Today I gather seeds from the green onions we let go in the container garden

 

Music: “Whiskey on the Mississippi” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License

Interesting Plant: Hummingbird Sage (Salvia spathacea) via BeWaterWise (@bewaterwiseh2o)

Hummingbird Sage (Salvia spathacea) via BeWaterWise.com

A few months ago I was invited down the office of the Metropolitan Water District to meet a number of people involved in their BeWaterWise.com project to help reduce water usage in California. As part of their efforts, they focus on providing plant alternatives to water hungry lawns. Over the next several weeks, I will be highlighting some of their garden alternatives as part of this series. For more information on these plants and other water conservation ideas and programs, vist BeWaterWise.comFollow the MWD on Twitter at BeWaterWiseH2O — Douglas

Hummingbird sage.jpg
Hummingbird sage” by Taken by Antandrusen:Image:Hummingbird_sage.jpg. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

This hardy, small clumping sage is a magnet for hummingbirds because of its spikes of deep magenta owers. This sage prefers shade to partial sun and requires moderate water although its root system helps it to survive drought. — BeWaterWise.com

Salvia spathacea (pitcher sage or hummingbird sage) is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae, native to southern and central California growing from sea level to 610 m (2,001 ft). This fruity scented sage blooms in March to May with typically dark rose-lilac colored flowers. It is cultivated in gardens for its attractive flowering spikes and pleasant scent. – Wikipedia

More information on Hummingbird Sage (Salvia spathacea):


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Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Video: Hibiscus – A Minute in the Garden #2 from A Gardener’s Notebook

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

More information on Hibiscus: