Bear’s Breeches (Acanthus) In The Garden via Instagram

Bear’s Breeches (Acanthus) In The Garden

Bear’s Breeches (Acanthus) In The Garden via Instagram

From my Instagram Feed

In the garden…Sweet Potato Update [Video]

Part of a series from A Gardener’s Notebook

@douglaswelch

In the garden…Sweet Potato Update ##garden ##gardening ##foid ##sweetpotato

♬ original sound – douglaswelch


In the garden...Sweet Potato Update  [Video]



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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents – 37 in a series – Bunny Succulents (Monilaria obconica) via House Beautiful

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents – 37 in a series – Bunny Succulents (Monilaria obconica) via House Beautiful

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents - 37 in a series - Bunny Succulents (Monilaria obconica) via House Beautiful

Similar to how its dolphin counterparts got the name, rabbit succulents (or Monilaria obconica, as Martha Stewart shares) look exactly like little green bunnies popping out of their burrows. It can really only be described as the cutest plant you’ll ever see. Look! Even their “ears” are fuzzy.

Unfortunately, unlike the dolphin succulents, which remain looking like miniature sea mammals as it grows, the succulent bunnies’ “ears” grow longer and longer, while their “heads” remain relatively the same size. Because of this, over time, they slowly begin to look less like the adorable baby bunnies they once were. – House Beautiful

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In the garden…Nasturtiums Up Close [Video]

Part of a series from A Gardener’s Notebook

@douglaswelch

Nasturtiums Up Close ##nasturtiums ##flowers ##plants ##garden ##gardening ##slomo

♬ Fadeaway – TikTok

In the garden...Nasturtiums Up Close [Video]



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Interesting Plant: Harlequin Glorybower (Clerodendrum trichotomum)

Interesting Plant: Harlequin Glorybower (Clerodendrum trichotomum)

Interesting Plant: Harlequin Glorybower (Clerodendrum trichotomum)

By Wendy Cutler from Vancouver, Canada – 20111029_Semlin11th_ClerodendrumTrichotomum_Cutler_P1160870Uploaded by PDTillman, CC BY 2.0, Link

Discovered this via the article 13 unique and interesting plants to grow in your garden on the Greener Living Blog. There are quite a few plants I will highlight here in future posts. — Douglas

Clerodendrum trichotomum, the harlequin glorybowerglorytree or peanut butter tree, is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae. It is native to China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan, India, and the Philippines[1].[2]

It is a large deciduous shrub, growing 3–6 metres (10–20 ft) high. The leaves are ovate, up to 12 cm (5 in) long, soft and downy or hairy, producing a peanut odor when crushed. The fragrant flowers are borne on branching peduncles. They have white petals, held within a green calyx which turns red as the fruits ripen. The fruits (drupes) are white, changing to bright blue and eventually dark blue on maturity.[3] They contain the novel blue pigment trichotomine.[4]

It is cultivated for its fragrant flowers, autumn colour, and ornamental berries. It is hardy but requires a sheltered position. The variety C. trichotomum var. fargesii (Farges’ harlequin glorybower) and the cultivar C. trichotomum var. fargesii ‘Carnival’[5] have gained the Royal Horticultural Society‘s Award of Garden Merit.[6] (confirmed 2017).[7]Wikipedia

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments!

More information:

View all past “Interesting Plant” posts


Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

22 Charming Chicken Coop Amenities via Country Living

22 Charming Chicken Coop Amenities via Country Living
You have your chicken coop all set up, but before you bring home your various breeds of chickens, don’t forget to accessorize—both with essential chicken-keeping elements and fun decorative accessories! Giving your chickens a cozy restful spot that accommodates their daily needs and habits is essential to raising happy—and prolific egg-laying—hens. Our Country Living panel of chicken experts suggests these six key elements needed for a safe and happy henhouse:
Read 22 Charming Chicken Coop Amenities via Country Living




An interesting link found among my daily reading

In the garden…Crows at their bath via TikTok [Video]

Part of a series from A Gardener’s Notebook

@douglaswelch

Crows at their bath ##crows ##corvids ##birds ##nature ##wildlife ##outdoors ##garden

♬ How Bad Can I Be? – Ed Helms

Crows at their bath via TikTok [Video]



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Historical Seed Catalogs: Garden novelties, 1937 / Bristol Nurseries, Inc.. – 64 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Garden novelties, 1937 / Bristol Nurseries, Inc.. – 64 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Garden novelties, 1937 / Bristol Nurseries, Inc.. - 64 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Garden novelties, 1937 / Bristol Nurseries, Inc.. - 64 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Garden novelties, 1937 / Bristol Nurseries, Inc.. - 64 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Garden novelties, 1937 / Bristol Nurseries, Inc.. - 64 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, Torrent from Archive.org

SEE MORE:

Publication date 1937
Topics Nursery stock Connecticut Bristol CatalogsPlants, Ornamental CatalogsShrubs Catalogs
Publisher Bristol, Conn. : Bristol Nurseries, Inc.
Collection usda-nurseryandseedcatalogusdanationalagriculturallibrarybiodiversityfedlinkamericana
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1937

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In the garden…Tooooooo hot! via TikTok [Video]

Part of a series from A Gardener’s Notebook

@douglaswelch

Tooooooo hot!A whole lotta nope in the garden today…at least until the sun goes down a bit. #he#at #ho#t #ga#rden #ga#rdening #su#mmer

♬ Hot Stuff – 70s Hits


In the garden...Tooooooo hot! via TikTok [Video]



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Dazzling Dahlias – 29 in a series – Discover Otto’s Delight, a Dinnerplate Dahlia in delicate peach tones via B Town Blog

Dazzling Dahlias – 29 in a series – Discover Otto’s Delight, a Dinnerplate Dahlia in delicate peach tones via B Town Blog

Dazzling Dahlias - 29 in a series -  Discover Otto’s Delight, a Dinnerplate Dahlia in delicate peach tones via B Town Blog

The romantic colors of Otto’s Delight are just one of many tones you can find in a “Dinnerplate Dahlia.” The term “Dinnerplate” refers to their very large flower, rather than an official variety. The term is applied to any Dahlia whose blooms exceed 8”. Many years past dahlias of this sort were quite a novelty, but today we are fortunate to have a large selection available coast-to-coast.

If you would like to try your hand at growing these extravagant blooms, you will be pleased to know it is not particularly hard, and my – they are worth it. They will start blooming midsummer and really hit their pace in early August. From there on out you can expect blooms, blooms, blooms for 10 weeks straight.

The key things to remember for growing success are: planting in the right spot, fertilizing consistently, providing proper support, and deadheading. Here is a little bit more detail to help you along.

 Read Discover Otto’s Delight, a Dinnerplate Dahlia in delicate peach tones via B Town Blog



Dahlias: Beautiful Varieties for Home & Garden




An interesting link found among my daily reading