A Garden Journal from A Gardener’s Notebook

 A Garden Journal from A Gardener's Notebook

A gardening journal can be a wonderful place to retire when heat, cold or weariness keep us at a distance from our gardens. In this busy world, business and travel keep us away from our gardens more than we like. On your next long flight, why not take your journal with you. You can use it to work out your grand plans instead of watching some insipid movie. Perhaps the salad would taste better as you remember the tomatoes from your own garden. Perhaps the coach seats won’t seem so small if you are thinking of the bench in your own garden.

From A Gardener’s Notebook by Douglas E. Welch DouglasEWelch.com

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Previously from A Gardener’s Notebook:

Noted: Artful Planters from Belgium by Julie Carlson via Gardenista

Artful Planters from Belgium by Julie Carlson via Gardenista

Artful Planters from Belgium by Julie Carlson via Gardenista

Planters as sculpture: handmade clay vessels from Belgian-based Atelier Vierkant function as art for the garden.

In the US, the planters—which “explore the possibilities of organic minimalism in form and surface texture”— are available from Interieurs, the newly opened Avenue Road in New York, and at Outdoor Therapy in Coral Gables, Florida. To see the full range, go to Atelier Vierkant.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

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Noted: A New View Of Trees, With Chris Earle via A Way to Garden

A New View Of Trees, With Chris Earle via A Way to Garden

A New View Of Trees, With Chris Earle via A Way to Garden

WHAT I VISUALIZE when I hear the word “tree” changed after a conversation with forest ecologist Christopher Earle, a co-author of two new titles in the Princeton Field Guides series: “Trees of Eastern North America” and the corresponding Western volume. Are you open to an expanded view, too (and to perhaps win the right book for the trees of your area)?

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

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Video: In the garden…Neighborhood Seed Gathering – October 10, 2014

A Gardener's Notebook Artwork

Showing off the seeds I have gathered in my neighborhood in hopes of propagating some new plants for my own garden.

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music:  “Whiskey on the Mississippi” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License 

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“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Video: Working Honey Bee

A honey bee during a neighborhood seed gathering walk.

Noted: Pathway Plantings That Please the Senses via Houzz

Pathway Plantings That Please the Senses

Traditional Landscape by Minneapolis Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Heidi’s Lifestyle Gardens

A walkway that strides through grass will certainly get you from point A to point B. But that same path becomes a delightful sensory experience when lined with beautiful plantings. Check out this gallery of images for various sidewalk garden ideas and planting suggestions that range from edibles to alpine perennials to fragrant shrubs.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts.

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Collect both horticultural and garden design books…from A Gardener’s Notebook

 Collect both horticultural and garden design books…from A Gardener's Notebook

The next item to consider for your gardening library is establishing a balance between books filled with information — latin names, identifying marks, propagation tips –and books that focus on theory and design. You want a few of each as you will need both sides of the equation. Informational books can help you in plant selection, placement and care, but theory books give your mind a place to dream and plan.

From A Gardener’s Notebook by Douglas E. Welch DouglasEWelch.com

Buy or Download a sample of From A Gardener’s Notebook via Amazon.com

Find more gardening books and items in the WelchWrite Bookstore from Amazon.com

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs

Previously from A Gardener’s Notebook:

Photo: Harvest Time via #instagram #fall #halloween

Photo: Harvest Time via #instagram #fall #halloween

Previously in my Instagram Photos…

Garden Alphabet: Agave americana

Agave americana

These agave are prominent all over the Southwest and used extensively in desert landscapes and even in the middle of lawns. Their large size and fairly long life make them a striking focal point of any garden. These agave are found on the grounds of the nearby Los Encinos State Historic Park, one of the original ranchos founded by the Spanish when they settled what was then called Alta California.

Garden Alphabet: Agave americana

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Agave americanacommon names century plantmaguey or American aloe,[4] is a species of flowering plant in the family Agavaceae, originally native to MexicoArizona and Texas but cultivated worldwide as an ornamental plant. It has become naturalized in many regions including the West Indies, parts of South America, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of AfricaIndiaChina,KoreaThailandNew ZealandAustralia and an assortment of oceanic islands.[5]

Despite the common name “American aloe”, it is not closely related to plants in the genus Aloe.

Although it is called the century plant, it typically lives only 10 to 30 years. It has a spread of about 4 ft (1.2 m) with gray-green leaves up to 2 ft (0.6 m) long, each with a prickly margin and a heavy spike at the tip that can pierce to the bone. When it flowers, the spike has big yellow flowers and may reach a total height of up to 25–30 ft (8–9 m) tall.

Its common name derives from its semelparous nature of flowering only once at the end of its long life. The plant dies after flowering, but produces suckers or adventitious shoots from the base, which continue its growth.[6] – Wikipedia

More information on Agave americana:

 

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Previously in Garden Alphabet:

Noted: Ground Force: 10 Top Ground Covers for Your Garden via Houzz

Ground Force: 10 Top Ground Covers for Your Garden via Houzz

Traditional Landscape by Sydney Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Arthur Lathouris Garden Designer
 
Leaving your soil uncovered in the garden is a bit like walking around in the hot sun with no hat — you’re asking for trouble. Bare soil is a magnet for weeds, their seeds blown into your garden by the wind or dropped by birds. Topsoil or potted plants can also contain weed seeds. 
 
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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items