Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) – 38 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) – 38 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a series

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Hardy Variegated Rose,

ROGER LAMBELIN.

One of the most remarkable Roses yet offered. The petals are irregular on the edges like a double Petunia; the color is glowing crimson throughout, except the edges of the petals,which are all distinctly marked with a white band, forming a sharp contrast and the most unique combination of colors known in Roses. The growth is free and vigorous and the fragrance is delightful, equal to the finest hardy Roses. This is a “novelty” of the most striking order.



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Lovely grapes, Pop Up ”Beach” and Market with DJ via Instagram

Lovely grapes, Pop Up ”Beach” and Market with DJ

Lovely grapes, Pop Up ”Beach” and Market with DJ via Instagram

Praça de Carlos Alberto, Porto, Portugal

A great moment to shop for some fresh produce and trinkets and kick back for a while.


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Bringing nature home: Why and how to garden with native plants via Coastal View News

Gardening with plants native to the Santa Ynez mountains and Carpinteria’s coastal bluffs is a beautiful way to honor the ecosystems in which we live, as well as providing an environmentally sustainable alternative to water-guzzling landscapes such as lawns.  

Native plants bloom and fruit prolifically throughout the year with almost no water, providing crucial food and shelter to animals, birds and insects and a limitless palette of textures, colors and scents for even the most formally landscaped garden. While the care requirements for natives are different from water-loving ornamentals, once established they require little time and effort to look lovely year-round.

Read Bringing nature home: Why and how to garden with native plants via Coastal View News



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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Dazzling Dahlias – 5 in a series – How to Grow Dahlias via White Flower Farm

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Dazzling Dahlias - 5 in a series - How to Grow Dahlias via White Flower Farm

Dahlias offer flamboyant flowers on lush plants from summer through fall, right up to the first frost. Fully hardy to zone 8, these hybrids of species native to Mexico and Colombia may overwinter in Zone 7 with a thick blanket of mulch. Gardeners in colder zones can get a head start by planting tubers in pots 4 to 6 weeks before the last spring frost date. Plant tubers several inches deep in a light, soilless potting mix and water sparingly until new growth appears, then more freely. Place pots in a sunny window or under grow lights, and then plant outside after danger of frost has passed. Taller varieties will need staking, with stakes placed carefully so as not to injure the tuber or roots. If planting is delayed (either indoors or in the ground), store the tubers in their bags in a cool, dry, dark location.

Read and Watch How to Grow Dahlias via White Flower Farm



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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Garden Books: My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban – 48 in a series


Historical Garden Books: My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban – 48 in a series

Historical Garden Books:  My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban - 48 in a series

Historical Garden Books:  My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban - 48 in a series

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A GARDEN ENCLOSED

In his “Song of Songs” Solomon sings of “a garden enclosed” Into such a garden Tennyson’s Maud was called by her lover.

Andrew Marvel speaks of “green thought in a green shade*’ — fancies of the mind in the lovely quiet of a green old garden.

The captive Israelite found his ideal of security and peace “under his vine and fig tree/’ where none made him afraid.

These poetic representations are symbols, for, will fancies springs or dreams come, or lovers meet, or the deep sense of home be felt, in a garden open to the public gaze?

The enclosed garden symbolizes civilized man’s relation to wild nature. At first it is a contest for mastery, but it results in an alliance by which nature is tamed and rendered more beautiful, and in turn ministers to man and becomes his inspiration in art and song.

 



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Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) – 37 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) – 37 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) - 37 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) - 37 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) - 37 in a seriesCAT31343796 0100

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A Personal Word

It is a pleasure to hand you my 1920 seed catalog, and as many of my customers have made inquiries as to why they did not receive our catalog last season,

I will take this opportunity to explain the reason.

During April, 1918, just as we were at the rush point of the seed selling season, I was called into the service of our country and with the enlisting of other members of the firm for service, it took our complete executive force and the business was necessarily dis- continued.

After spending ‘ one year in Uncle Sam’s army, mostly in overseas duty on four different fronts, some of which were in quite strenuous action, we were discharged in April 1919 and at once resumed our civil life in the seed business, but too late to prepare and issue a catalog for the 1919 season. It requires at least three or four months to prepare the copy and get the first catalog from the press, and for that reason we had to be content to serve only our local customers during the 1919 season.

If some of our customers not receiving a catalog got the impression that we were out of the business, we hope the appearance of this catalog will correct that wrong impression, as the seed business is our life work and we are in it from now on stronger than ever. We have enlarged our business greatly through the^purchase of the business of the Mills Seed Company, of Washington, Iowa, as fully ex- plained on the next page, and are prepared to handle a larger volume of business and do it with more promptness and dispatch than ever before.

It has been our effort to make this catalog not only interesting, but instructive, and you cannot help but learn considerable if you read it from cover to cover. Everything is represented just as the camera takes it, the illustrations being photo reproductions and not the artist drawn pictures that you find in many other seed catalogs. Through the pur- chase of the Mills Seed Company we will issue one hundred thousand more catalogs this season than heretofore and if you Mve a friend or two that you believe would like a copy of this catalog, please send us their name.

 


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Dazzling Dahlias – 4 in a series – Dahlia ‘Happy Single Party’

Dazzling Dahlias - 4 in a series - Dahlia 'Happy Single Party'
 

Botanical name
Dahlia ‘Happy Single Party’ (Happy Single Series)

Other names
Dahlia ‘Party’, Dahlia ‘Happy Single Party’ , Dahlia ‘HS Party’

Genus
Dahlia

Variety or Cultivar
‘Happy Single Party’ _ ‘Happy Single Party’, part of the Happy Single Series, is a tuberous perennial with divided green foliage and yellow flowers with dark centres in summer and autumn.

Foliage
Deciduous

Habit
Clump-forming, Compact, Erect

See more at Shoot Gardening



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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Streetside succulents, Flores Joaquim Santos, Foz, Porto, Portugal via Instagram

Streetside succulents, Flores Joaquim Santos, Foz, Porto, Portugal

Streetside succulents, Flores Joaquim Santos, Foz, Porto, Portugal via Instagram

Just across from our room in Puerto, this florist shop always had a lovely outdoor display of succulents, too. They were shining in the sun this day, almost begging for a photograph.


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Historical Garden Books: Wall and water gardens by Gertrude Jekyll (190?) – 47 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Wall and water gardens by Gertrude Jekyll (190?) – 47 in a series

Historical Garden Books: Wall and water gardens by Gertrude Jekyll (190?) - 47 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: Wall and water gardens by Gertrude Jekyll (190?) - 47 in a series

Historical Garden Books: Wall and water gardens by Gertrude Jekyll (190?) - 47 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: Wall and water gardens by Gertrude Jekyll (190?) - 47 in a series

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PREFACE

THERE is scarcely an English country home where some kind of gardening is not practised, while in a very large number of country places their owners have in some degree become aware of the happiness that comes of a love of flowers, and of how much that happiness increases when personal labour and study work together to a better knowledge of their wants and ways.

In this book a portion only of the great subject of horticulture is considered, namely, simple ways of using some of the many beautiful mountain plants, and the plants of marsh and water. It is intended as a guide to amateurs, being written by one of their number, who has tried to work out some of the problems presented by the use of these classes of plants to the bettering of our gardens and outer grounds.

The book does not attempt to exhaust the subject, neither does it presume to lay down the law. It is enough, in the case of the rock and wall plants, for instance, to name some of the best and easiest to grow. Those who will make such use of it as to work out any of the examples it suggests, will then have learnt so much for themselves that they will be able to profit by more learned books and more copious lists of flowers.

The large quantity of pictorial illustration is in itself helpful teaching. ” I like a book with pictures ” is not only an idle speech of those who open a book in order to enjoy the trivial intellectual tickling of the thing actually represented ; but the illustrations are of distinct educational value, in that they present aspects of things beautiful, or of matters desirable for practice, much more vividly than can be done by the unpictured text.

I am indebted to the proprietors of The Garden for the use of some of the illustrations, and for a valuable list of plants and other particulars communicated to that journal by Mr. Correvon of Geneva ; also to the proprietors of Country Life for a still larger number of subjects for illustration ; to the late Mr. G. F. Wilson of Weybridge and former owner of the gardens at Wisley for several photographs for reproduction ; and to Mr. W. Robinson for two photographs of unusual interest. I have also to acknowledge the kind help of Mr. James Hudson, who compiled the list of Water-Lilies at the end of the last chapter.

In some cases I have made critical observations on pictures showing portions of various English gardens. If any apology is due to the owners of these gardens I freely offer it, though I venture to feel sure that they will perceive my intention to be not so much criticism of the place itself as the suggestion of alternatives of treatment such as might also be desirable in places presenting analogous conditions.

G. J.



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Captivating Cactus: 3 in a series – Saguaro Cactus via cactus_collector on Instagram

Captivating Cactus: 3 in a series - Saguaro Cactus via cactus_collector on Instagram

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