Video: Working Honey Bee

A honey bee during a neighborhood seed gathering walk.

Noted: Pathway Plantings That Please the Senses via Houzz

Pathway Plantings That Please the Senses

Traditional Landscape by Minneapolis Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Heidi’s Lifestyle Gardens

A walkway that strides through grass will certainly get you from point A to point B. But that same path becomes a delightful sensory experience when lined with beautiful plantings. Check out this gallery of images for various sidewalk garden ideas and planting suggestions that range from edibles to alpine perennials to fragrant shrubs.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts.

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Collect both horticultural and garden design books…from A Gardener’s Notebook

 Collect both horticultural and garden design books…from A Gardener's Notebook

The next item to consider for your gardening library is establishing a balance between books filled with information — latin names, identifying marks, propagation tips –and books that focus on theory and design. You want a few of each as you will need both sides of the equation. Informational books can help you in plant selection, placement and care, but theory books give your mind a place to dream and plan.

From A Gardener’s Notebook by Douglas E. Welch DouglasEWelch.com

Buy or Download a sample of From A Gardener’s Notebook via Amazon.com

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Previously from A Gardener’s Notebook:

Photo: Harvest Time via #instagram #fall #halloween

Photo: Harvest Time via #instagram #fall #halloween

Previously in my Instagram Photos…

Garden Alphabet: Agave americana

Agave americana

These agave are prominent all over the Southwest and used extensively in desert landscapes and even in the middle of lawns. Their large size and fairly long life make them a striking focal point of any garden. These agave are found on the grounds of the nearby Los Encinos State Historic Park, one of the original ranchos founded by the Spanish when they settled what was then called Alta California.

Garden Alphabet: Agave americana

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Agave americanacommon names century plantmaguey or American aloe,[4] is a species of flowering plant in the family Agavaceae, originally native to MexicoArizona and Texas but cultivated worldwide as an ornamental plant. It has become naturalized in many regions including the West Indies, parts of South America, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of AfricaIndiaChina,KoreaThailandNew ZealandAustralia and an assortment of oceanic islands.[5]

Despite the common name “American aloe”, it is not closely related to plants in the genus Aloe.

Although it is called the century plant, it typically lives only 10 to 30 years. It has a spread of about 4 ft (1.2 m) with gray-green leaves up to 2 ft (0.6 m) long, each with a prickly margin and a heavy spike at the tip that can pierce to the bone. When it flowers, the spike has big yellow flowers and may reach a total height of up to 25–30 ft (8–9 m) tall.

Its common name derives from its semelparous nature of flowering only once at the end of its long life. The plant dies after flowering, but produces suckers or adventitious shoots from the base, which continue its growth.[6] – Wikipedia

More information on Agave americana:

 

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Previously in Garden Alphabet:

Noted: Ground Force: 10 Top Ground Covers for Your Garden via Houzz

Ground Force: 10 Top Ground Covers for Your Garden via Houzz

Traditional Landscape by Sydney Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Arthur Lathouris Garden Designer
 
Leaving your soil uncovered in the garden is a bit like walking around in the hot sun with no hat — you’re asking for trouble. Bare soil is a magnet for weeds, their seeds blown into your garden by the wind or dropped by birds. Topsoil or potted plants can also contain weed seeds. 
 
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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

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Noted: Great Design Plant: Purple Needle Grass, California’s State Grass via Houzz

Great Design Plant: Purple Needle Grass, California’s State Grass via Houzz

Landscape by San Francisco Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Pete Veilleux, East Bay Wilds

Selected as the official California state grass in 2004, purple needle grass (Stipa pulchra) has a tough constitution and showy awns, making this native bunchgrass an option for low-water home gardens and restoration projects (see the caution regarding growing it near pets below, though). The quintessential California native grass, purple needle grass announces itself each spring with a flush of growth, even without rain. In the summer it shimmers with gold while its awns and seeds sway and sparkle in the breeze. It looks best during the summer and fall, when other native plants are fading. It goes dormant as the year progresses, only to revive again in the spring.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

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Garden Decor: Lovely Mirror in the Garden

Lovely mirror in the garden

I have a large mirror repurposed in a much more rustic way in my garden, but this formal arrangement is very lovely. It would take a bit of work and the right salvage pieces, but I think it could be recreated in your own garden. Mirrors help to expand small gardens by giving the illusion that the garden expands beyond its actual, physical boundaries.

Garden Decor: Lovely Mirror in the Garden

Via Pinterest User Kathy McConnell

More Garden Mirror ideas from Pinterest

Previously in Garden Decor:

Noted: 5 Ways to Put Fall Leaves to Work in Your Garden via Houzz

5 Ways to Put Fall Leaves to Work in Your Garden via Houzz

Landscape by Wyckoff Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Horizon Landscape Company

In fall my town holds leaf collection days, when homeowners (or their landscape services) blow or rake fallen leaves off their properties into big piles in the streets. Later a truck comes and vacuums them away. What I see being vacuumed up are dollar bills, the money these homeowners will spend next year on lawn and garden fertilizers, mulch and bagged compost. Money they might have saved if they’d simply used those leaves in their gardens.

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“Noted” items are particularly good finds from my daily reading which I share via all my social media accounts. 

Find more Noted/Shared Gardening items

Interesting Plant: Bauhinia

Bauhinia

I am propagating several of these small trees from seed gathered in my garden. They have a nice compact habit and produce beautiful flowers. I was captivated with it the moment I saw it, even if it took some time — and help from the Goole+ #gardenchat folks to identify it. You can find a link to my recent “In the garden…” video on these trees below.

Bauhinia

 

Bauhinia /bˈhɪniə/[4] is a genus of more than 200 species of flowering plants in the subfamily Caesalpinioideae of the large flowering plant family Fabaceae, with a pantropical distribution. The genus was named after the Bauhin brothers, Swiss-French botanists.

Many species are widely planted in the tropics as orchid trees, particularly in northern IndiaVietnam and southeastern China. Other common names includeMountain Ebony and Kachnar (India and Pakistan). In the United States of America, the trees grow in Hawaii, coastal CaliforniaTexasLouisiana, and Florida.Bauhinia ×blakeana is the floral emblem of Hong Kong—a stylized orchid tree flower appears on the Hong Kong flag and Hong Kong Airlines uses ‘Bauhinia’ as its radio callsign in air traffic communication.

Bauhinia trees typically reach a height of 6–12 m and their branches spread 3–6 m outwards. The lobed leaves usually are 10–15 cm across.

The five-petaled flowers are 7.5–12.5 cm diameter, generally in shades of red, pink, purple, orange, or yellow, and are often fragrant. The tree begins flowering in late winter and often continues to flower into early summer. Depending on the species, Bauhinia flowers are usually in magenta, mauve, pink or white hues with crimson highlights. – Wikipedia.org

 
More information on Bauhinia:

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Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas