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Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Patio Bed Cleanup and Division Complete

Patio Bed CleanupAfter almost a week of being down with a bad cold, I HAD to get out into the garden today. Since it was garbage day, it was also a good idea to fill our green bin while we had the chance.

About 2 weeks ago I cleaned out half of this bed, dividing a large clump of agapanthus and replanted the divisions. I ran out of time, energy and green bin space, so I left the remainder until today. Having done part of this bed already, I knew what I had to do. The large amount of leaves were raked off, pulling out most of the agapanthus with it. They were so crowded that they had pushed themselves almost completely out of the underlying soil, so they came up easily. It only took a few moments to pull out the strongest rhizomes and set them aside for transplanting.

My little Troy-Bilt Electric Cultivator did its usual great job of fitting up the bed. I then dug a small trench and re-inserted the rhizomes. After a good watering-in and then a run on the soaker hose, I was done.

I am thinking of picking up some nasturium seeds to plant in this newly turned area, They have done well in this area in the past and should brighten up this bed which is so close to the house and we see every day.

It is great to have this particular project out of the way and it shows me how to approach the clean up of my other beds.

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Monday, September 14, 2009

Elsewhere Online: Tilling is one chore you might be able to skip

Cultivating after early rain.Image via Wikipedia

I thought I was just being lazy by not doing a lot of tilling in my garden. (SMILE) This article from Fine Gardening magazine gives several other reasons, though.
Tilling is one chore you might be able to skip

Turning the soil over each year is a millennium-old tradition that has been challenged only in the last half century. The major benefits attributed to the annual rite of tilling are that it aerates the soil; chops and kills weeds; and mixes in organic materials, fertilizers, and lime. Not to be downplayed are the psychological benefits of tillage. It induces a righteous-feeling sweat that makes a clean slate of last yearís mistakes. So is it any wonder that plants survive and thrive in the wild in the untilled soil of fields and forests? Not really.

Read this entire article "Tilling is one chore you might be able to skip"


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Wednesday, March 04, 2009

Elsewhere Online: Indoor Gardening Projects for Kids

seed packets, garden map, old couchImage by cafemama via Flickr

I am always looking for garden projects for kids, so when I saw this one come through my RSS feeds, I knew I wanted to share it with everyone here. There are 3 projects which can help to keep your kids (and you, too) entertained on those cold, damp and possibly snowy days.You can read about a germination experiment I did with my son a few years ago. We had a good time and it includes pictures and everything.

Read: The Seeds of Time


Indoor Gardening Projects for Kids

When I was a tiny child, I remember proudly bringing home a paper cup full of dirt and bean seeds.

I would watch anxiously for the first peep of the stem pushing through the soil.

Years later, I still enjoy watching new plants grow.

Gardening can teach children so many skills. They learn about science, patience, math and more. You donít have to wait until summer, either. There are many gardening projects that can be started indoors year-round - especially inviting in the bleak winter months.

Read the entire article

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