Smithsonian Scientists Are Using Ginkgo Leaves to Study Climate Change—and They Need Your Help via Smithsonian

 
The next time you venture into the great outdoors, keep an eye out for Ginkgo biloba trees, which can be easily identified by their distinctive fan-shaped leaves. If you find one—and you likely will, as the native Chinese plant is now ubiquitious in the United States—take a moment to pluck a few leaves, snap some photographs of the scene, and record your observations via the iNaturalist mobile app. Then, package your sample in an envelope, drop it into the mailbox, and give yourself a pat on the back. Congratulations: You’ve just become a citizen scientist, helping researchers at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History use ginkgo leaves to study the past, present and future of climate change.

Read Smithsonian Scientists Are Using Ginkgo Leaves to Study Climate Change—and They Need Your Help via Smithsonian




An interesting link found among my daily reading

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