Historical Garden Books: Biggle garden book; vegetables, small fruits and flowers for pleasure and profit (1908) by Jacob Biggle, – 19 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of 

Historical Garden Books: Biggle garden book; vegetables, small fruits and flowers for pleasure and profit (1908)
by Jacob Biggle, – 19 in a Series

Historical Garden Books: Biggle garden book; vegetables, small fruits and flowers for pleasure and profit (1908)
by Jacob Biggle, - 19 in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books: Biggle garden book; vegetables, small fruits and flowers for pleasure and profit (1908)
by Jacob Biggle, - 19 in a Series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org


 

PREFACE

In reality a preface is rather a queer thing, because it’s a “foreword” which is written last! So, it seems, I am now to have the last word. To begin, I feel especially indebted to R. L. Watts for several extracts from his excellent Pennsylvania Bulletin No. 147; to W. N. Hutt, author of Maryland Bulletin No. 116 ; and to the authors of various other bulletins, books and catalogs whose writings have given me occasional lifts over rough places. My thanks go also to the E. A. Strout Co., New York City, and to a few well-known implement manufacturers, who kindly loaned me several photographs. ‘Most of the pictures in the book, however, were especially made for it by expert photographers and engravers who were carefully instructed regarding the practical details of each picture.

Now just a few hints about the final problem of the average gardener — the selling end of the business : Don’t ship to every strange commission house that solicits your consignment. Get a good solid house and stick to it. Or sell direct to storekeepers; or join or form a co-operative shipping and selling association ; or work up a list of retail customers of your own. As an aid to the latter plan, the Long Island Agronomist, Huntington, N. Y., has evolved a shipping package which it calls a “home hamper.” It measures twenty-four inches long, fourteen inches wide, ten inches deep, and weighs about thirty pounds when filled. It contains six baskets holding about one-half peck each; these are filled with vegetables in season, from radishes to cauliflower. Assortment is made to furnish soup, salad and substantial, with occasional fancies, such as eggplant and cantaloupes. Home hampers are packed in the morning, shipped by express at 7 A. M., and delivered at the customer’s door in time for dinner ; hence real sweet corn, crisp lettuce, melting peas, beans, etc., all A No. 1, are available for the table of the city dweller. The average family uses two home hampers per week. Price, $1.50 each, delivered at the door, within the delivery limits of the Long Island Express Company and payable at the end of each month. Good idea, it seems to me. Try it.

Send only fresh, clean, attractive products to market ; sort, grade and honestly pack and mark each package ; give full measure ; use only clean, neat packages, and put your name and brand thereon. Keep the ”culls” for stock feed; earn a reputation for fancy products only.

My earnest wish : May your garden be a great success, whether planned for pleasure or profit.

Elmwood. Jacob Biggle.

 

More information on this book:

Publication date 1908
Publisher Philadelphia, W. Atkinson Co.
Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress
Language English

Learn more about gardening history with these books

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Comments are closed.