Interesting Plant: Eremurus ‘Lemon Meringue’

Interesting Plant: Eremurus ‘Lemon Meringue’

As is often the case, I am struck by a plant for this series simply by the way it looks in pictures. Sometimes those pictures aren’t the most accurate representation of the plant, but they do send me down the road of investigating a particular plant and seeing how it might work in my garden. This picture of Eremurus ‘Lemon Meringue” shows a fairly open and airy version of the flower, but other photos show it to be much more heavy and dense.  I imagine this is what the flowers might look like when they are first emerging.

It really doesn’t matter, though, as it is a very nice plant no matter how it is represented. This does point up the fact, that it is important to research any plant you might think of adding to your garden as it may not look the same as it does in the advertising brochures. Check with your fellow online gardeners, see their photos and hear about there experiences with a particular plant or variety before planting it yourself. I imagine this can save a bit of gardener’s heartache down the road.

Erqemurus

Via PInterest User Sally Matthews

Interesting Plant: Eremurus ‘Lemon Meringue’

Eremurus /ˌɛrɨˈmjʊərəs/[1] is a genus of 35-40 deciduous perennial flowers, also known as the foxtail lilies or desert candles. Theinflorescence looks similar to a long spike or a bottlebrush. It consists of many flowers in copper, bright yellow, snow white, pastel pink, orange or any combination of those colors. The leaves grow in tufts of thin, green, straplike strips. Species are known for thick roots that grow out from a central hub. It is also known for being tall, sometimes rising up to 10 feet over the foliage, depending on the variety. These plants are generally native to western and central Asia, although Eremurus thiodanthus is endemic to the Crimea. — Wikipedia

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More information on Eremurus ‘Lemon Meringue’

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