Historical Seed Catalogs: Stokes seeds – 1918 for large vegetable growers – 22 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: Stokes seeds – 1918 for large vegetable growers – 22 in a series

 

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

THE COLORS ARE FLYING HERE AT WINDERMOOR FARM

For portentous events have occurred since last Good Friday and, although the task before us is a long, hard one, we must see it through with a fine heart. The year has passed here with a satisfactory record of accomplishment. Some of our men have joined the colors, others of us have been told officially to keep at the business of seed production. Windermoor Farm has done well, better than ever before; but only about five per cent of our supply can be grown here. The other ninety-five per cent is a dif- ferent story. A severe European winter, a torrid California summer, early September frosts in Mich- igan and Minnesota, the general shortage of labor, and the prevailing high market prices have affected the world’s seed supply more seriously than ever before. The demand is very heavy; the stock in hand is very short, and it is held by growers at extremely high prices; therefore, the resulting increased cost of seed and, in many cases, difficulty of obtaining it at any price. Seedsmen and vegetable-growers are not being singled out for hardships. For every American this war means new and difficult undertakings. Our “lives of mediocre endeavor” are no more, for there is a war to be won, and food will win the war. Right here lies the great opportunity for every vegetable-grower who is big enough to overcome difficulties caused by the scarcity and high cost of labor, fertilizer, and seed. In laying your plans for the coming year, keep this one fact paramount in your mind, that the United States Food Administration is going to do everything in its power to advo- cate the more general use of fresh vegetables in order to conserve the grain and meat supply. Business the country over is good.

Almost every man is at work with high wages, and this means unquestionably a strong market all through the season. Lay your plans carefully and well. Bring your organization up to the greatest possible efficiency. Above all, take no chances of crop failure because of poor seed. There will be some of this on the market this year, for there never have been so many seed crop failures in the history of the trade. Aside from the total elimination of certain varieties, we believe we are in a position to care for our normal demand. If this should increase very materially, our supply will not hold out. The careful planter will look after his seed supply very early in the season. As seedsmen and vegetable-growers, we have a great opportunity to serve the country together. We must prove ourselves big enough to meet this opportunity. “Are We Downhearted? No!”

STOKES SEED FARMS COMPANY

Publication date 1918
Publisher Moorestown, N.J. : Stokes Seed Farms
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1918
 
 
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Hollyhocks (Alcea) are blooming via Instagram

What is your favorite rose? Leave a comment and share!

Hollyhocks (Alcea) are blooming

Hollyhocks (Alcea) are blooming via Instagram

Our friends up the street have always had a wild and exuberant display of Hollyhocks in their yard. I love the tall and stately stems with the multiples of large flowers. So last year, I gathered a bunch of seeds from their garden and scattered them in mine. This week, I am finally seeing some results from that. While these hollyhocks are not quite as big as my friend’s, they are a welcome addition and to the garden. I am going to gather seed again this year and try to spread them even more. 


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An Iris In The Rose Garden via Instagram

What is your favorite rose? Leave a comment and share!

An Iris In The Rose Garden

An Iris In The Rose Garden via Instagram

Who says you can only have roses in a rose garden? There were a number of striking iris there, too. 

From the @calpolypomona rose garden. I think it at nearly the height of its bloom. It took me over an hour to work my way around the garden. 


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Coral Rose via Instagram

What is your favorite rose? Leave a comment and share!

Coral Rose

Coral Rose via Instagram

More roses from the @calpolypomona rose garden. I think it at nearly the height of its bloom. It took me over an hour to work my way around the garden. 


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Pink Rose via Instagram

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Pink Rose 

Pink Rose via Instagram

More roses from the @calpolypomona rose garden. I think it at nearly the height of its bloom. It took me over an hour to work my way around the garden. 


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Ground cover in the Cal Poly Pomona Rose Garden via Instagram

What is your ground cover? Leave a comment and share!

Ground cover in the Cal Poly Pomona Rose Garden

Ground cover in the Cal Poly Pomona Rose Garden via Instagram

I don’t know what plant this, but it provided a nice contrast among all the blooming roses in the garden. 

 


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Chinese Fringe Tree (Chionanthus retusus) via Instagram

What is your favorite flowering tree? Leave a comment and share!

Chinese Fringe Tree (Chionanthus retusus)

Chinese Fringe Tree (Chionanthus retusus) via Instagram

The spring flowers keep coming at Cal Poly Pomona. I found these trees adjacent to the rose garden — where I also took a bunch of pictures. 


Chionanthus retusus (Chinese fringetreeChinese流蘇樹 liúsūshù) is a species of Chionanthus native to eastern Asia, in eastern and central ChinaJapanKorea, and Taiwan.[1]

It is a deciduous shrub or small to medium-sized tree growing to 20 ft in height, with thick, fissured bark. The leaves are 3–12 cm long and 2–6.5 cm broad, simple ovate to oblong-elliptic, with a hairy, 0.5–2 cm long petiole. The flowers are white, produced in panicles 3–12 cm long. The fruit is a blue-black drupe 1–1.5 cm long and 0.6–1 cm diameter.[1]

It is cultivated in Europe and North America as an ornamental tree, valued for its feathery white flowerheads.[2] — Wikipedia


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NEW DESIGN! – A Ladybug Sleeps — Get This Lovely Ladybug on Floor Pillows, Totes, Phone Cases And More! [For Sale]

NEW DESIGN! - A Ladybug Sleeps -- Get This Lovely Ladybug on Floor Pillows, Totes, Phone Cases And More! [For Sale]

NEW DESIGN! – A Ladybug Sleeps

Get This Lovely Ladybug on Floor Pillows, Totes, Phone Cases And More!

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Interesting Plant: Clematis x cartmanii ‘Avalanche’ (White Evergreen Clematis)

Interesting Plant: Clematis x cartmanii ‘Avalanche’ (White Evergreen Clematis)

Interesting Plant: Clematis x cartmanii 'Avalanche' (White Evergreen Clematis)

I came across this while browsing /r/gardening on Reddit and love the look immediately. I don’t see many clematis here in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles. I am guessing it is probably too hot and dry for most varieties but I would like to have this one cascading over my back wall.

From San Marcos Growers…

Interesting Plant: Clematis x cartmanii 'Avalanche' (White Evergreen Clematis)

Clematis x cartmanii ‘Avalanche’ (White Evergreen Clematis) – An evergreen Clematis with pure white single flowers with prominent yellow stamens in the center. The unique deeply-cut, leathery, green leaves, which are a very attractive feature when the plant is in full bloom, are nearly hidden by the profusion of flowers in early to mid spring. Flowers are borne on previous season’s stems. Plant on a fence or trellis where stems can grow 12-15 feet with support ,or use as a groundcover. If used to trail over and down a slope, it can look like an avalanche of white flowers. Plant in full sun to light shade and water regularly spring through summer. Hardy to 10 to 15° F. A plant patent is applied for this plant. This is a selected seedling from a cross made at Blackthorn Nursery, England by renowned plantsman Robin White. The pollen parent was Clematis paniculata and the seed parent was Clematis marmoraria – both evergreen species from New Zealand. The name C. × cartmanii honors the respected botanist Joe Cartman who first produced this cross from C. paniculata and C. marmoraria. The original registered name for this plant is Clematis x cartmanii ‘Blaaval’.  This description is based on our research and observations made of this plant as it grows in our nursery, in the nursery garden and in other gardens that we have visited. We will also incorporate comments received from others and always appreciate getting feedback of any kind from those who have some additional information about this plant, in particular if this information is contrary to what we have written or if they have additional cultural tips that would aid others in growing Clematis ‘Avalanche’.

From Monrovia…

Interesting Plant: Clematis x cartmanii 'Avalanche' (White Evergreen Clematis)

A profusion of pure white flowers with bright gold stamens blankets the lustrous, deep green, trifoliate foliage in spring. Stunning when used to trail down embankments – like an avalanche of snow when in bloom! Train to climb a trellis, post or fence, or allow to meander unsupported through shrub borders. Evergreen.

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments!

More information on Clematis x cartmanii ‘Avalanche’ (White Evergreen Clematis):

View all past “Interesting Plant” posts



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Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

A Ladybug Sleeps via Instagram

What is your favorite beneficial garden insect? Leave a comment and share!

A Ladybug Sleeps

A Ladybug Sleeps via Instagram

In the native plant garden at Cal Poly Pomona


NEW DESIGN! - A Ladybug Sleeps -- Get This Lovely Ladybug on Floor Pillows, Totes, Phone Cases And More! [For Sale]

NEW DESIGN! – A Ladybug Sleeps

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
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