Historical Seed Catalogs: The Wing Seed Co (1918) – 55 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The Wing Seed Co (1918) – 55 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The Wing Seed Co (1918) - 55 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The Wing Seed Co (1918) - 55 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The Wing Seed Co (1918) - 55 in a series

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INTRODUCTION


ONCE MORE it is our pleasure to greet customers, both old and new, and to wish them the best of every- thing for the coming year.

The past year has been such a busy one with us, that we cannot resist the temptation of telling you a little about it. To begin with, our business started out about as usual in January and the first half of February. About the middle of February, orders began coming nicely, and presently we found that our regular force was unable to take care of them. We doubled the force and finally trebled it. Even then, we were unable to quite keep up with our orders. Doubtless, some of you waited several days while we were filling. Practically our entire force worked taking care of orders. We worked overtime every day, and we worked Sun- days for about six weeks.

We are sorry that we kept anybody waiting a single day, and do not think this will happen again, because we are much better equipped now to handle a large amount of business than we were a year ago. But, on the other hand, we are very glad indeed to have had this nice lot of business, and wish to thank you for it.

As soon as the rush of orders was over, we put Out our Trial Grounds as usual, and all summer trained men have carefully studied every flower and vegetable that we sell. In this manner, we are able to keep in touch with the best of everything, to compare different strains of vegetables, and all sorts of new things, both in flowers and vegetables. It costs a good deal of money to do this, but we know of no other way to secure the results that we are now getting.

As a result of Trial Ground’s work, we are, this year, cataloguing two remarkable new varieties of Lettuce, Ohio Grand Rapids and Just-In-Head, as well as several other items of only a little less importance.

Our work in the flowers has been a continual delight. Space does not permit us to dwell on the many hundred va- rieties which we are listing, but we believe that we have a collection now of as choice varieties as can be found any? where. We have searched all of America as well as Europe for these things, and we are proud of the entire collec- tion. Our assortment of Gladioli is now one of the largest in the United States. The same thing may be said of our Iris and Peonies, and there are very few collections of Dahlias that are larger than ours. The past season has been ex- cellent for growing these bulbs, and we are indeed gratified with their appearance this fall.

The only serious disappointment that we have this season is in European^ vegetable seeds, and even in these we are reasonably well prepared, because last year we placed very heavy contracts in Europe, expecting to receive small de- liveries. We did receive even smaller deliveries than we expected, but even so, there was enough so that in many items we can furnish the highest quality of European stock, and we believe that our critical trade will appreciate this.

Our Bulb Department has been growing so nicely that it now requires quite a little land. This fall we have pur- chased a farm for the purpose of growing bulbs, and we now have planted perhaps twelve acres of Bearded Iris, a smaller amount of Japanese, and perhaps five acres of Peonies. We will also have, next year,^ a few acres of Gladioli, and prob- ably ten acres of Dahlias. This farm is located just outside the village of Mechanicsburg, on the Mechanicsburg and West Jefferson pike. Throughout the season we will be very glad to have visitors inspect these crops, and we hope in a few year’s time to have a very beautiful sight in these fields of blooming flowers.

Our Trial Grounds are situated right at the Seed House, and here we will be glad to show visitors our hundreds of tests of vegetables, annual flowers, etc.

We can be reached by rail, by changing at Springfield, Delaware, Milford Center, or by Auto Bus from Urbana.

See more: Vegetables Seeds Catalogs


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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 25 in a series – Sempervivum on Wikipedia

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 25 in a series – Sempervivum on Wikipedia

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 25 in a series - Sempervivum on Wikipedia

By SchnobbyOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Sempervivum (Brit. /sɛmpəˈvaɪvəm/,[1] U.S. [̩sɛ̃mpeɹ’vivũm]) is a genus of about 40 species of flowering plants in the Crassulaceae family, commonly known as houseleeks. Other common names include liveforever (the source of the taxonomical designation Sempervivum, literally “always/forever alive”) and hen and chicks, a name shared with plants of other genera as well. They are succulent perennials forming mats composed of tufted leaves in rosettes. In favourable conditions they spread rapidly via offsets, and several species are valued in cultivation as groundcover for dry, sunny locations.[2]

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From Gardening Don’ts (1913) by M.C. 18

From Gardening Don'ts (1913) by M.C. 18

DON’T (no matter how
much you may wish
them to grow there) put any
plants in a spot where they
will not be happy.

From Gardening Don'ts by M.C. 01

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Historical Garden Books – 68 in a series – Productive vegetable growing by John William Lloyd

Historical Garden Books – 68 in a series – Productive vegetable growing by John William Lloyd

Historical Garden Books - 68 in a series - Productive vegetable growing by John William Lloyd

Historical Garden Books - 68 in a series - Productive vegetable growing by John William Lloyd

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PREFACE

Books on vegetable production have been written from the viewpoint of the East, West, North and South. The present volume is written from the viewpoint of conditions as they exist in the great central prairie region, known agriculturally as the corn belt. But the principles here laid down are apphcable in all sections. The cultural requirements of the various crops have been analyzed in the light of many years’ experience with vegetables, and an attempt has been made to present the underlying principles of vegetable production in a clear and logical manner, and place vegetable gardening on a rational basis. It is impossible for man to control the climate of a given locality. It is possible, however, for him to adapt his gardening operations to the conditions as he finds them. Knowing the temperature requirements of a given crop and the length of season demanded for its development, he can adjust the time of planting and method of handhng to meet as fully as possible the needs of the particular crop. But in spite of all that can be done even by the well-informed gardener, vegetables demanding radically different climatic conditions may not thrive equally well in the same garden. A reasonable degree of success with a large number of different vegetables can be attained by a careful grower in almost any locality, but the commercial production of special crops should rarely be undertaken except in localities where the climatic and other conditions are especially favorable for the particular crop in question.

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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 24 in a series – Plant Shopping With Partly Sunny Projects on TikTok

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 24 in a series – Plant Shopping With Partly Sunny Projects on TikTok

@partlysunnyprojects

##plant shopping for ##cactus and ##euphorbia 🌵##partlysunnyprojects ##ceoofcactus

♬ original sound – partlysunnyprojects


Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 24 in a series - Plant Shopping With Partly Sunny Projects on TikTok

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Dazzling Dahlias – 21 in a series – Dahlias: Beautiful Varieties for Home & Garden By Naomi Slade and Georgianna Lane

Dazzling Dahlias – 21 in a series – Dahlias: Beautiful Varieties for Home & Garden By Naomi Slade and Georgianna Lane
 
Dazzling Dahlias - 21 in a series - Dahlias: Beautiful Varieties for Home & Garden By Naomi Slade and Georgianna Lane
Purchase at Bookshop.org
 
 

Fall blooms for an explosion of color in the garden.

The dahlia is a fabulous cutting flower for the home garden. Cut one bloom, and ten more appear on the plant. Blooming late summer to the first frost of autumn, this native of Mexico provides explosions of color in home gardens. The author’s commentary unearths the dahlia from its Aztec origins and imparts practical, hands-on knowledge for growing and overwintering these tropical plants in wintry climes.

Including classics like Caf au Lait and lesser-known varieties like Voodoo and Honka, readers will discover a stunning range of specimens from tiny pompoms to heavy-headed dinner plates, to those that resemble daisies, sea anemones, and even fireworks

Naomi Slade is a well-known journalist and photographer specializing in gardening, environment, and lifestyle. A biologist by training, naturalist by inclination, and with a lifelong love of plants, she contributes regularly to a range of British publications including The English Garden and House and Garden, and appears on TV and radio.

Georgianna Lane is a leading floral, garden and travel photographer whose work has been widely published. Her work has featured in BBC Gardens Illustrated, Gardener’s World, Romantic Homes and Victoria. Visit her blog at georgiannalane.com, which chronicles her styled floral photo shoots and more.





An interesting link found among my daily reading

Wisteria announces the coming spring via Instagram

Wisteria announces the coming spring

Wisteria announces the coming spring via Instagram

Our wisteria started sprouting new leaves just a few days ago, showing that spring is in full swing here in Southern California.


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From Gardening Don’ts (1913) by M.C. 17

From Gardening Don'ts (1913) by M.C. 17

DON’T try to make a
daffodil hedge. They
look so miserable standing
stiffly like soldiers ‘ at atten-
tion,’ instead of scattered
about in happy groups.

From Gardening Don'ts by M.C. 01

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Historical Garden Books – 67 in a series – A-B-C of vegetable gardening by Eben Eugene Rexford

Historical Garden Books – 67 in a series – A-B-C of vegetable gardening by Eben Eugene Rexford

Historical Garden Books - 67 in a series - A-B-C of vegetable gardening by Eben Eugene Rexford

Historical Garden Books - 67 in a series - A-B-C of vegetable gardening by Eben Eugene Rexford

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FOREWORD

NOT everybody has a garden. Some deny themselves the pleasure and the profit of one because they have never had any experience in gardening, and have somehow got the impression that special training is necessary to make a success of the undertaking. Here is where they make a mistake. There is no special knack about it. Any one who owns a bit of land, and has some time that can be given to garden-work, and an inclination to do so, can make a gardener of himself in a season — and a successful one, too — if he allows himself to be governed by the advice of some one who has had some experience along this line.

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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 23 in a series – Echeveria from Succulents Box

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 23 in a series – Echeveria from Succulents Box

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 23 in a series - Echeveria from Succulents Box

Echeveria is a family of rose-shaped succulents native to the semi-desert regions of Central America. Echeverias are one of the most popular succulents thanks to its charming rosettes with gorgeous water-storing leaves. Echeveria succulents come in a variety of beautiful colors and usually produce stunning flowers. They are super easy to care for, grow quickly, and can tolerate drought. 

Echeveria succulents would make a great addition to any decor. Not only do succulents add a bit of tropical greenery to their surroundings, they are also quite sustainable and easy to keep alive. You can freshen up your living room decor with Echeverias, or use them as luscious additions to your wedding decor! 

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