Flowering Now: Calandrinia(?) via Instagram – April 16, 2019

What is your favorite flower color? Leave a comment and share!

Flowering Now: Calandrinia(?) via Instagram - April 16, 2019

Flowering Now: Calandrinia(?)

Spotted in a neighbor’s garden. I am not quite sure of the ID as there have been many new Mediterranean plants in the recently planted drought-tolerant gardens. 

These “shouts” of color certainly catch the eye as you are walking by…or even driving. 


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Waterfall/Rivulet, BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona via Instagram

Where’s your favorite waterfall? Leave a comment and share!

Waterfall/Rivulet, BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona via Instagram

Waterfall/Rivulet, BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

A peaceful scene in the garden—One of several gardens on the Cal Poly Pomona Campus. It is amazing how calming it can be to watch and listen to falling water, no matter how small the source. I think it has something to do with the chaotic nature of the flow. It is unpredictable and so it holds our attention.

From Cal Poly Pomona web site…

“The Rain Bird BioTrek Project is an educational experience for visitors of all ages that emphasizes the need to share knowledge, values, and behaviors that support sustainability on a finite Earth. In its greenhouse, gardens, and stations, it provides interactive educational connections to the tropical rainforest, California’s indigeneous plants and people, and other ancient and present day habitats.” 

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Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

What is your favorite plant? Leave a comment and share!

Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus communis)

In the Orto Botanico In the Brera District of Milan grows this lovely castor bean including seed pods.

While the seeds are poisonous and the caster bean is an invasive here in Southern California, it is often used as an ornamental in Europe. 

Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

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A Very Prickly Pear (Opuntia), BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

What is your favorite succulent or cactus? Leave a comment and share!

A Very Prickly Pear (Opuntia), BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

One of several gardens on the Cal Poly Pomona Campus. Although relatively small, this garden has a large collection of plants both outdoors and inside a sizable glass house.

“The Rain Bird BioTrek Project is an educational experience for visitors of all ages that emphasizes the need to share knowledge, values, and behaviors that support sustainability on a finite Earth. In its greenhouse, gardens, and stations, it provides interactive educational connections to the tropical rainforest, California’s indigeneous plants and people, and other ancient and present day habitats.”

A Very Prickly Pear (Opuntia), BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

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Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta) [Video] (1 minute, 38 seconds)

Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta)

Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta)

A female Valley Carpenter Bees (Xylocopa varipuncta) feeds on Mexican sage in my garden a few days ago. I was out working to clear up a mass of grass and weeds caused by the rainy year we have had when I spotted her nearly in my face. I took a break and watched for quite a while she fed.

This sage was a recent addition to the garden, specifically for use by bees and hummingbirds, so it is great to see it being put to use.

From Wikipedia

Xylocopa varipuncta, the valley carpenter bee, is one of three species of carpenter bee found from western New Mexico to northern California.[1] Females are a metallic black while males are fuzzy and gold with green eyes. They are the largest bees found in California,[2] growing to around 1 inch (2.5 cm) in length.

A distinguishing characteristic that uniquely separates X. varipuncta from other species of bees is their ability to thermoregulate. This allows them to fly at very high temperatures without overheating and at low temperatures without freezing.[3] By modifying their foraging patterns and flying between different altitudes depending upon temperature, the valley carpenter bee is able to adapt to very different environments through predisposed behavioral patterns.[3]


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Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus via Instagram

What is blooming in your garden? Leave a comment and share!

Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus

A lovely bit of Spring as I walked around campus a few weeks ago. The contrast of the bright yellow against the dark@green leaves really made them pop. This great bloom is probably another result of our good winter rains this year. 

Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus via Instagram

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Historical Garden Books: The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White – 35 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White – 35 in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a Series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

PREFACE

INSTRUCTION in flower-growing has been given in American educational institutions for many years. Early in its history such instruction was a part of the curriculum of general horticulture, lectures in floriculture being given by those engaged in teaching other branches.

Within the last ten years there has been, a breaking up of general horticultural instruction. Separate departments of pomology, market-gardening, and floriculture have been created, and each is supervised by one who devotes his entire time to his special subject.

Floricultural education, as a distinct and separate department, is, therefore, of comparatively recent origin. Because of this, there are few precedents, and the courses given have resulted from the experiences of comparatively few men. The material here presented has been compiled largely from the author’s lectures. The book is, therefore, the outgrowth of experience and general observations. Branches of the subject which seemed unimportant, and methods of teaching which proved ineffective, have been eliminated, and only those phases retained which have appeared to meet the needs of students.

In the author’s experience in teaching distinctly floricultural subjects, he has felt the need of a text-book. There are good books on special topics but no one work that treats of the general principles of flower-growing.

The purpose of the author has been, therefore, to consider the principles that underlie the successful culture of ornamental plants and to present them in such a way that the book may be useful in the classroom. It is also hoped that it may be of service in a useful way to practical men.

Illustrative material has been chosen largely from those subjects which the author has found to be helpful in his own work. It is expected that it will be supplemented by lantern slides and photographs illustrating the results of applications of the principles herein contained.

The author appreciates deeply the interest taken in this work by men engaged in various floricultural occupations and their hearty response to his requests for information regarding various details of the business. He is indebted also to his colleagues in Cornell University who have read the manuscript and have made suggestions for increasing its usefulness.

E. A. WHITE.

DEPARTMENT OF FLORICULTURE,
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY,
ITHACA, N.Y.
April 1, 1915.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1915
Topics Floriculture
Publisher New York, The Macmillan company
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 
 
Find more information on garden history with these books


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Flowering Now: Brunfelsia (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow) via Instagram

What is your favorite flower color? Leave a comment and share!

Flowering Now: Brunfelsia (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow) via Instagram

Brunfelsia (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow)

More blooms this week with these brunfelsia. These were on the property when we bought it 23 years ago and I loved them so much I planted 2 more last year in a different area. 

Each bloom progresses from blue to purple to white as it ages, giving rise to its common name. 


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Flowering Now: Daffodils 2019 via Instagram

What is your favorite sign of Spring? Leave a comment and share!

Daffodils 2019 via Instagram

This year’s normal rainfall has made everything jump in the garden, including the weeds, and these daffodils look amazing. They are always a great harbinger of Spring even if they do mean hotter weather is coming. 


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Flowering Now: Gerbera Daisy in the Garden via Instagram

What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share!

It is always a welcome surprise to see these Gerbera Daisies popping up in the garden. They were originally decorations from a close friends memorial service and each time they appear they remind me of him. A great way to keep someone in your memories year after year. 

Flowering Now: Gerbera Daisy in the Garden via Instagram


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