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What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 5 in a series – “…and a good, strong garden scissors and knife for cutting flowers.”

  Photo: Eco Warrior Princess “THE best hose, not a half-inch imitation, but a good rubber hose that will carry as large a stream as your water-pipe will yield, is one of the first “tools” to be secured for a California garden. As to “sprinklers” and “projectors,” two-thirds of them are useless, but in every hardware […]

What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 4 in a series – “…the son of a poor country clergyman who had a small flower garden…”

By Alexander Roslin – Nationalmuseum, Public Domain “Linnaeus, the renowned Swedish botanist, was the son of a poor country clergyman who had a small flower garden in which he cultivated all the flowers which he could procure and his means would permit. From the earliest childhood of the son, he was taught to love and […]

What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 3 in a series – “…I wish to make a plea for a decorative plant too little used: the cactus.”

This new series is an ongoing collection of quotes from the books I am currently reading. — Douglas See more cactus pictures and posts on A Gardener’s Notebook ”And now I wish to make a plea for a decorative plant too little used: the cactus. In the first place the cacti are a very purely […]

What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 2 in a series – …more sustaining than the philosophies of any new thought.

This new series is an ongoing collection of quotes from the books I am currently reading. — Douglas Read this for FREE at Archive.org ”I believe from the bottom of my heart that there is no more powerful factor in the development of character than garden-making, just as I believe that flowers are potent to […]

What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 1 in a series

This new series is an ongoing collection of quotes from the books I am currently reading. — Douglas Read this for FREE at Archive.org ”For the citybred man a half-hour of vigorous exercise in the garden in the morning will be better for health than dumb-bells, and the charm of the early day, the song […]