Historical Garden Books: Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) – 12 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) – 12 in a Series

A bound collection of this monthly newsletter complete with Index.

Historical Garden Books:  Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) - 12 in a SeriesPopulargardening4188unse 0011

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AN

ILLUSTRATED PERIODICAL

DEVOTED TO

Horticulture in all its Branches.

CONDUCTED BY

Elias A. Long, Author of “ Ornamental Gardening for Americans
“ The Home Florist,” Etc.,

Volume 4, 1888=89.

BUFFALO, N. Y.:

Popular Gardening Publishing Co.

The Apple Crop and Foreign Markets. A yield of Apples rather above the average in this country and especially in the fruit sections of Western New York, Canada, and Nova Scotia is at this date a certainty, and corresponds with the fruit crop report published in our July issue. But with a large crop the market outlook is per- haps brighter for steady prices, than for some years past. This is due partly to the growing Western demand in our own country; but chiefly because of the almost entire failure of Apples in Great Britain, with but a light crop on the Continent. In England, this is doubtless caused by the unprecedently cold, rainy season, together with the previous season’s drought, con- tributing to fearful insect ravages this year. The consequence to our own fruit growers must be that all the first grade of winter Apples can be disposed of at good figures, the quotations of September 10, giving prices at Liverpool, on the first shipments as, per barrel: Kings, $1.85 to $5.75; Blush, $4.35 to $5.08; Baldwins, $2.88 to $3.40; Greenings, $2.40 to $2.76. These prices were for sound fruit of good size, well packed and graded.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1885
Publisher Buffalo, N.Y. : Popular Gardening Pub. Co
Digitizing sponsor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Alternates
Language English
Volume v.4(1888-1889)

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