25 Anti-Mimetic Tactics for Living a Counter-Cultural Life via Epsilon Theory [Shared]

Despite the slightly over-written title, there are some interesting points made in this piece that get you thinking. — Douglas

25 Anti-Mimetic Tactics for Living a Counter-Cultural Life – Epsilon Theory

25 Anti-Mimetic Tactics for Living a Counter-Cultural Life via Epsilon Theory

Sometimes going with the flow is nice. Nobody wants to be the disagreeable, anti-mimetic guy in a group that makes it impossible to gain consensus among a group of friends about where to grab a beer or a bite to eat. And I consider it a positive thing to be infected by the calm, even lazy, disposition of a non-workaholic friend if that helps you chill on Sunday and make good on the day of rest.

The word ‘mimetic’ was coined by the French social theorist René Girard. It is related to the word ‘mimic’—the human propensity to mimic what the people around them are doing. But Girard’s finding went deeper: it’s not only what they do, but what they want that we also mimic. We adopt their desires as our own, unconsciously—and then convince ourselves that our desires are entirely our own. He called this mimetic desire, and I’ve written about it extensively in my book Wanting.

Below are some of the ways that we might cultivate some ‘anti-mimetic’ habits so that we’re not constantly struggling to keep up in the hamster wheel of desire that most of the people around us are running on—and reinforcing the wheel for one another. I hope some of these tactics will help you step off and chart your own course a bit more easily.

Read 25 Anti-Mimetic Tactics for Living a Counter-Cultural Life – Epsilon Theory

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