02 About Dr. Rosanne Welch from Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered – Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 12 seconds)

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02 About Dr. Rosanne Welch from Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered - Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 12 seconds)

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Transcript:

Thank you all very much. I apologize that I will speak in English because we do very bad in teaching languages in the United States. So this is the best that I can do, but I appreciate very much the translator who will help us all this evening. So thank you all for coming. We are here to talk about why researching screenwriters is important and I think it’s a very important thing. I’ve been teaching it for a while and I was, in fact, a screenwriter myself for a while. As a writer in Hollywood, I wrote for these television shows. You can see me in the little corner picture there quite a few years ago on “Touched by an Angel”, “Beverly Hills 90210”. These are the kind of programs from the United States that get traveled around the world and I teach my students now how important it is that they are finally being able to take in the stories from other countries and we’ll talk about the importance of streaming media and how that has allowed for that to happen as we move on.

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

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Women’s History Month 23: Julia Morgan

Women's History Month 23: Julia Morgan

Julia Morgan

Though a number of women in the United States and worldwide worked as architects in the 1800s, Julia Morgan was the first woman licensed to practice architecture in California and one of the most prominent and prolific architects of her time. Her best- known achievement was the Hearst Castle in San Simeon, California.

Learn more about Julia Morgan


Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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Women’s History Month 22: Lucy Stone

Women's History Month 22: Lucy Stone

Lucy Stone

An antislavery advocate and prominent suffragist, Lucy Stone is also remembered for refusing to change her surname upon her marriage. Stone was born on August 13, 1818, in West Brookfield, Massachusetts, to Francis Stone and Hannah Matthews. From her younger days, she was appalled at the subordination of women in her own household and the socially accepted unequal salary structure in school where she taught.

Learn more about Lucy Stone


Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

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Women’s History Month 21: Bella Abzug

Women's History Month 21: Bella Abzug

Bella Abzug

Flamboyant feminist leader Bella Abzug, or “Battling Bella,” served three terms in Congress, first representing New York City’s 19th District and then after redistricting the 20th District from 1971 to 1977. Although Abzug’s political career came to an end after an unsuccessful bid for a Senate seat, her efforts on behalf of countless liberal causes made her as famous as her penchant for hats.

Learn more about Bella Abzug


Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

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From The “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Archives 18: “Lillian Hellman: A ‘Difficult’, Villified Woman.”, NPR, Maureen Corrigan

Months of research went into the creation of the essays in “When Women Wrote Hollywood.” Here are some of the resources used to enlighten today’s film lovers to the female pioneers who helped create it.

From The “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Archives 18: “Lillian Hellman: A ‘Difficult’, Villified Woman.”, NPR, Maureen Corrigan

From The

“Difficult” is probably the most tactful word one could use in characterizing Lillian Hellman. If ever there were an author safer to meet through her art rather than in real life, she was the one. Born in New Orleans into a Jewish family, Hellman came of age in the Roaring ’20s, liberated by flappers and Freud. Hellman drank like a fish, swore like a sailor and slept around like, well, like most of the men in her literary circle, chief among them Dashiell Hammett, with whom she had an open relationship spanning three decades. She was, recalled one observer, a “tough broad … the kind of girl who can take the tops off bottles with her teeth.”

Read more


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Women’s History Month 20: Toypurina

Women's History Month 20: Toypurina

Toypurina

Toypurina, a Kumi-Vit (or Tongva) woman from the village of Javachit in today’s San Gabriel Valley, California, was born nine years before the Spanish began colonizing southern California. The Spanish would have identified her as a Gabrielino, a term that identified all native people who were relocated to San Gabriel Mission (est. 1771) and baptized. A leader of an insurrection against the San Gabriel Mission in 1785, she continues to be a symbol of resistance to Spanish colonization.

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Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

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Women’s History Month 19: Angela Davis

 

 

Women's History Month 19: Angela Davis

Angela Davis

An activist, scholar, professor, philosopher and author who came to prominence in the Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1960s and 1970s, Angela Davis had close ties with the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. In 1970, Davis was arrested and charged with conspiracy in an armed confrontation that resulted in four deaths. She was later acquitted of all charges. The author of eight books, Davis is Distinguished Professor Emerita with the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a former director of the university’s Feminist Studies department. Davis remains a powerful advocate of gender equity, the abolition of the prison-industrial complex, and LGBTQ rights.

Learn more about Angela Davis


Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

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03 Elizabeth Gaskell from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 3 seconds)

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03 Elizabeth Gaskell from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 3 seconds)

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In honor of Halloween – and in service to my teaching philosophy —

“Words Matter. Writers Matter. Women Writers Matter.”

I presented this holiday lecture “When Women Write Horror” on Tuesday, October 29th, 2019. Researching the many, many women who have written horror stories – in novels, films and television – brought new names to my attention who I am excited to start reading. I hope you will be, too!

Transcript:

In also just a little bit post her period when I was researching this I found it so interesting. There were not many women who we teach in our schools, but here they were living full, professional careers as writers in eras when we don’t even think about women having jobs at all, right? So Elizabeth Gaskell really interested me. I love the fact that you can see full shelves of books written by women and books based on horror stories which again, we don’t really relate to women. So what was that about and why were they getting away with that? I think she’s really cool because we mostly know these women for the drama novels they wrote. The things that were proper books. If you wrote a book at all it was about a proper society. So Cranford is what she’s mostly known for which was turned into a miniseries with some famous ladies who’ve you seen in other sorts of Harry Potter-like stories, but she really wrote all kinds of ghost stories and she began her career by being published by Charles Dickens. So Dickens was doing magazine publishing and he’s publishing a lot of women which I thought was very interesting. I had not equated that with him. So Elizabeth Gaskell is one of the names we should know more.

 

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Women’s History Month 18: Audra Ann McDonald

Women's History Month 18: Audra Ann McDonald

Audra Ann McDonald

Actress and singer Audra Ann McDonald became the first performer to win six competitive Tony Awards in 2014 and the only performer to have won a Tony in all four acting categories. A graduate of the Julliard School, a performing conservatory in New York City, McDonald began acting as a child when her parents enrolled her in a theater group to manage a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD).

Learn more about Audra Ann McDonald


Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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Women’s History Month 17: Laura Cobb 

Women's History Month 17: Laura Cobb 

Laura Cobb 

Highly decorated member of the Navy Nurse Corps Laura Mae Cobb served as a military nurse for almost thirty years.  She is best known for her leadership of the nurses, immortalized as the “Angels of Bataan,” who were held captive in the Philippines by the Japanese from just after Pearl Harbor until their liberation in February 1945.  Throughout her time as a prisoner of war, Cobb and other Navy and Army nurses tended to those needing care while subtly resisting their captors, even mislabeling bottles to prevent looting. Under Cobb’s leadership, the nurses performed heroically and exemplarily, for which they were eventually recognized.  Finally, on February 23, 1945, after four years in captivity and with almost all the nurses bordering on starvation, an American rescue team liberated them.  

Learn more about Laura Cobb


Learn about more Women In History with these encyclopedia from Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library