Save The Date! — Write Like a Mother: A Conversation on TV Writing and Motherhood, Friday, August 9, 2019 at 7:30 PM

Write Like a Mother: A Conversation on TV Writing and Motherhood

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Write Like a Mother: A Conversation on TV Writing and Motherhood

When: Friday, August 9, 2019 at 7:30 PM – 9 PM
Where: Writers Guild Foundation, 7000 W 3rd St, Los Angeles, California 90048
Tickets $25/$20 at wgfoundation.org


Write Like a Mother: A Conversation on TV Writing and Motherhood

We are teaming up once again with Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting for a mother of a panel.

On this special evening, we gather a panel of TV writers and producers for a discussion about their experiences writing and developing nuanced portrayals of motherhood while also balancing duties as working moms themselves.

Panelists

  • Julia Brownell – This Is Us, About a Boy, Parenthood
  • Jamie Denbo – American Princess, Ronna & Beverly
  • Valentina Garza – Jane the Virgin, Bordertown, The Simpsons
  • Stay tuned for more panelist announcements!

Moderated by Dr. Rosanne Welch


Learn more about the Stephens College Master of Fine Arts in TV and Screenwriting 

 

Learn more about the Stephens College Master of Fine Arts in TV and Screenwriting 

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 34 in a series – Bess Meredyth and The Academy

Do you know about these women screenwriters? Many don’t. Learn more about them today! 

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 34 in a series - Bess Meredyth and The Academy

Get “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Today!

Bess Meredyth continued to cultivate an enormously successful screenwriting career. Meredyth was one of the thirty-six artists—including fellow screenwriter Jeanie Macpherson—who founded the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1928 (Sturtevant). Her name can be found in more than a dozen Academy bulletins as a member of the Awards of Merit committee, which was one of the first committees established.

You’d Better Learn to Hold Your Liquor:  Bess Meredyth and A Career in Early Hollywood
by Sydney Haven


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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

07 More On Frankenstein from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction – Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 16 seconds)

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The Sisterhood of Science Fiction: A Walk Through Some Writers and Characters You (Should) Know And Love

07 More On Frankenstein from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction - Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 16 seconds)

 

This one allowed me to riff on some of my favorite female science fiction writers across time, whether they be novelists or television writers. It also opened up a good conversation on what art we support and include in our lives – and what that art says to us and about us. — Rosanne

Transcript:

It then became such a huge hit that was kind of like “Oh” and then she’s rich so it’s not gonna hurt her day her reputation too much. Then she was kind of like “You know I want some credit for that. Everyone’s talking about this really wonderful book. I should let people know I did it. So the next version that came out in 1823 they put her name on it and of course from then on we’ve done that. Of course, just like with all things women achieve, I hate to tell you this but there’s always the discussion of “really did she write that I did Percy Shelley do most of the work and he drew his girlfriend’s name on it just as a present to her” and that’s been debated for years how much of it did he actually write. Luckily, in the British Library, they have her original papers. They have her original handwriting and his copy editing. So the different handwriting and you can see that in the next version which of those notes he took she took and which of those notes she ignored cuz honey it’s my book, not yours, right? So we have proof that is largely by and large hers. In any book that’s written, a writer sends it out to many friends, takes many notes, makes changes as they choose. We just always like to pick on when the girls make changes it must be something that the boys contributed much to, right? So I think that’s fascinating.



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Quote from “America’s Forgotten Founding Father” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 61 in a series – General Thaddeus Kosciuszko

Learn more about the American Revolution through the eyes of an important, Italian Immigrant, Filippo Mazzei. Read his story today!

Quote from

“In Pisa Filippo entertained several Polish visitors as they came through, including General Thaddeus Kosciuszko, who was not only a hero in the recent events in Poland, but of the American Revolution as well. The two had met over dinner at Monticello in 1776, when Kosciuszko had come to offer his military talents to the revolutionaries, read the Declaration of Independence and desired to meet and congratulate the man who had written it.”

From America’s Forgotten Founding Father — Get Your Copy Today!


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From America’s Forgotten Founding Father — Get Your Copy Today!

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Great Summer Read – The Library Book by Susan Orlean

Great Summer Read - The Library Book by Susan Orlean

I’m not often a joiner but when I saw the Los Angeles Times had started a book club I checked out their first book choice and it was one I intended to read anyway – so I joined. 

The book is Susan Orlean’s “The Library Book” which is a micro history using the 1986 library fire at the Central Library downtown as the starting off point for a wonderful walk through the creation of a Central Library, the hiring (and firing – and tumult caused by such firing) of the various head librarians who have been in charge, and an interesting look at the architecture involved in both the original building and the addition added post the fire. It was such a fun read I swallowed it over a few days after downloading it from the very library it discussed (because all the hard copies were already being borrowed).

Without reading this I wouldn’t have learned that the Atlanta library remained segregated until 1959.  Or that in the days when silence was important in libraries, head librarians summoned members of the staff to her desk (and she was often a she in those early days as being a librarian was an acceptable job for a woman) with one of those metal clickers they use to train dogs – each librarian had a morse-code like collection of clicks they would hear to tell them to come talk to their boss.  Or that in 1981 investigators found a woman selling used books out of her room at the Beverly Hills Hotel that she had taken from the LA Public Library — and she was making over $40,000 a year on that enterprise.  Who would even think up an idea like that?  Better yet, some studios would send assistants to the library to steal books needed for research so they wouldn’t have to bother remembering to renew them over the course of making the movie.

I could go on. Suffice it to say that if you LOVE books and LOVE or LOVED libraries at any time in your life, this is a fabulously interesting book to peruse this summer.

Her conclusion?  It is necessary to collect these books because “it declares that all these stories matter, and so does every effort to create something that connects us to one another, and to our past and to what is still to come.” 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

 

Happy Birthday to Film Pioneer – Alice Guy Blaché

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 5 in a series - Alice Guy Blaché

Alice Guy-Blaché (July 1, 1873 – March 24, 1968) was a pioneer filmmaker, active from the late 19th century, and one of the first to make a narrative fiction film.[2] From 1896 to 1906 she was probably the only female filmmaker in the world. [3] She experimented with Gaumont’s Chronophone sound syncing system, color tinting, interracial casting, and special effects. She was a founder and artistic director of the Solax Studios in Flushing, New York, in 1908. In 1912 Solax invested $100,000 for a new studio in Fort Lee, New Jersey, the center of American filmmaking prior to the establishment of Hollywood. That same year she made the film A Fool and his Money, with a cast comprised only African-American actors. The film is now at the National Center for Film and Video Preservation at the American Film Institute.[4] Wikipedia

Guy Blaché

A House Divided (Solax, 1913)

More about Alice Guy Blaché

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09 Important Women Screenwriters Today from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (58 seconds)

Part of the California State University, Fullerton Faculty Noon Time Talks at the Pollak Library.

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09 Important Women Screenwriters Today from

 

Transcript:

Next, I don’t know most important , I don’t how I ordered these except they came to this order but Callie Khouri — anyone that can name the movie that she’s famous for? (Audience: Thelma & Louise) Thelma & Louise! Thank you. Thank Goodness. Thelma & Louise! An amazing film, right, that is still being talked about and debated in women’s studies, in Cinema Studies. Do we like the ending Don’t we like the ending? Is it how it could have ended? I think that’s pretty brilliant. Susannah Grant is probably not a name you recognize off the top of your head but you’ve seen these movies. Erin Brockovich is a huge film, right? Charlette’s Web – she has a lot of early kids work which is adorable. And Pocahontas, which is a very very famous Disney film so Suzanne has been one of our newer people and then as you recognized, Diablo Cody, right? Diablo Cody showed up doing Juno and then she did the United States of Tara with Spielberg on television. She’s moving and grooving through town so we’ll see what her next project is but she won an Oscar for Juno. That was her first outing as a screenwriter.

Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses the women in her new book “When Women Wrote Hollywood” which covers female screenwriters from the Silents through the early 1940s when women wrote over 50% of films and Frances Marion was the highest paid screenwriter (male or female) and the first to win 2 Oscars.  Yet, she fails to appear in film history books, which continue to regurgitate the myth that male directors did it all – even though it’s been proven that the only profitable movies Cecil B. de Mille ever directed were all written by Jeannie Macpherson film ever won for Best Picture was written by Robert E. Sherwood (who people have heard of, mostly due to his connection to Dorothy Parker) and Joan Harrison.


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Mentoris Project Podcast: Soldier, Diplomat, Archaeologist: A Novel Based on the Bold Life of Louis Palma di Cesnola with Author, Peg Lamphier

My latest podcast with my fellow Mentoris authors is now available on the Mentoris Web Site. Give it a listen and Subscribe for More! — Rosanne

Mentoris Project Podcast: Soldier, Diplomat, Archaeologist: A Novel Based on the Bold Life of Louis Palma di Cesnola with Author, Peg Lamphier

Mentoris Project Podcast: Soldier, Diplomat, Archaeologist: A Novel Based on the Bold Life of Louis Palma di Cesnola with Author, Peg Lamphier

Soldier, Diplomat, Archaeologist: A Novel Based on the Bold Life of Louis Palma di Cesnola with Author, Peg Lamphier

Hosted by Dr. Rosanne Welch

Listen Now

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Today’s guest is Peg Lamphier, author of Soldier, Diplomat, Archaeologist: A Novel Based on the Bold Life of Louis Palma di Cesnola.

As the son of an Italian count, Cavalry Colonel Louis Palma di Cesnola had more military experience than most of the leading officers in the Civil War. Objecting to his general’s orders, di Cesnola led his men into battle, earning himself a Medal of Honor.


About the Author

 

Peg A. Lamphier lives in the mountains of Southern California with five dogs, seven tortoises, a huge cat, two canaries, one husband, one daughter, and a collection of vintage ukuleles. When she’s not writing fiction or otherwise fooling around, she’s a professor at California State Polytechnic, Pomona, and Mount San Antonio Community College. For more information and to sign up for her newsletter, see www.peglamphier.com.

 

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Also from the Mentoris Project

 

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Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 33 in a series – Alice Guy Blaché and Gaumont

Do you know about these women screenwriters? Many don’t. Learn more about them today! 

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 32 in a series - Alice Guy Blaché and Gaumont

Get “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Today!

Sixty-three of the movies that Alice Guy Blaché made while working for Gaumont are collected on the DVD Gaumont Treasures. Disk 1 is dedicated entirely to Blaché. While just a drop in the bucket of the work she did when she was there, it is a fascinating exploration of how quickly her work and voice grew.

The Nature and Genius of Alice Guy Blaché
by Khanisha Foster


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood or Buy the Book on Amazon

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

06 A Nameless Author from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction – Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (52 seconds)

Watch this entire presentation

The Sisterhood of Science Fiction: A Walk Through Some Writers and Characters You (Should) Know And Love

06 A Nameless Author from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction - Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (52 seconds)

 

This one allowed me to riff on some of my favorite female science fiction writers across time, whether they be novelists or television writers. It also opened up a good conversation on what art we support and include in our lives – and what that art says to us and about us. — Rosanne

Transcript:

(Audience Question) I’m really curious of how she felt then if she had a miscarriage at the time and she read books. Welch: That’s a fascinating point of view. Sadly or not sadly– interestingly — rich women did engage in the art of reading. So it’s interesting how we like to tell poor women how to behave. Rich women can do whatever they please right? So he’s acceptable in her world because you were supposed to read things and be a good reader so you could teach your children — your sons — to be good leaders in the world. So it was acceptable — that’s an excellent question though that’s like whoa. That’s a critical thinking kind of question going on right there because you’re right and but they felt that it was not proper to put out the novel with her name on it. So they didn’t right? In 1818, it doesn’t say Mary Shelley’s just here’s a book. Read it if you want to. Whatever. You can’t even tell from the cover — you’re right — what it’s about right?



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!