Women’s History Month – 9 in a series – Dorothea Dix

Women's History Month - 9 in a series - Dorothea Dix

Dorothea Lynde Dix was an activist in a variety of social reform movements. Her exposure to the dreadful conditions in U.S. prisons and consequent prison reform efforts led her to seek reforms for the mentally ill, particularly with regard to their treatment in asylums. She trained nurses during the American Civil War (1861–1865) but returned to asylum reform after the war.

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Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Which women writers do you read? — International Women’s Day 2017

Which women writers do you read?

Thinking about International Women’s Day and thinking about how whenever I ask female writers which writers they admired in their youth they often go straight to the boys – F. Scott and Ernest.

Sure, we read all of those boys (because that’s what school gave us) – and we’re welcome to have liked them – but really, WHAT were we reading on our own?

In asking that question, I realized I learned more from Mary Shelley and Margaret Mitchell and Eve Bunting and S.E. Hinton and Agatha Christie and Toni Morrison and Emily Neville and Elizabeth George Speare and Betty Cavanna.  

Which women did you read then?

Which women do you read now?

On YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator’s Corner Season 2 Episode 4

On YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator's Corner Season 2 Episode 4

Watch YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator’s Corner Season 2 Episode 4

I liked this video and think you might find it interesting, too!

Women’s History Month – 8 in a series – Maria Mitchell, Astronomer

Women's History Month - 8 in a series - Maria Mitchell, Astronomer

Maria Mitchell was the first American astronomer to discover a telescopic comet—a comet too far away to see with the naked eye but detectable with a telescope. For her achievement, she was rewarded with a gold medal by the king of Denmark, became the first female member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and later became a professor at Vassar College, one of the first exclusively all-women colleges in America.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 7 in a series – Ellen Craft

Women's History Month - 7 in a series - Ellen Craft

Ellen Craft was a fugitive slave made famous by the daring escape she and her husband William Craft (1824–1900) made in December 1848. Ellen, disguised as an infirm and sickly slaveholding gentleman, and her husband William, posing as a slave servant, traveled from the slaveholding state of Georgia to freedom in Philadelphia. So widely publicized was their escape that the Crafts became world- renowned spokespersons for abolitionism.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 6 in a series – Martha Ballard

Women's History Month - 6 in a series - Martha Ballard

Martha Moore Ballard played a pivotal role in her community as a midwife and healer. Through her diary she has become a historically important female voice documenting social, economic, and religious change in rural postcolonial America. Few women could write in the 18th century, and fewer still participated in public life, resulting in poor documentation of women’s daily lives. Because women could not own property and seldom participated in legal matters, few details regarding individual women’s lives appear in historical documents. 

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 5 in a series – Bridget Bishop

Women's History Month - 5 in a series - Bridget Bishop

The religious passion and antiwoman sentiment of 17th-century colonial North America reached its apogee in Salem, Massachusetts, during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. One victim of the trials, Bridget Playfer Waselby Oliver Bishop, was accused three times of being a witch and was hanged in 1692, the first victim of the Salem hysteria. The vast majority of people executed for witchcraft were women. Eighteen others followed Bishop to the hangman’s noose before the governor put a stop to it a few months later.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Rosanne Welch and Peg Lamphier performing in The Vagina Monologues at Cal Poly Pomona [Video] (14:12)

Rosanne Welch and Peg Lamphier performing “The Woman Who Loved to Make Vaginas Happy” at Cal Poly Pomona [Video]

Rosanne Welch and Peg Lamphier performing “The Woman Who Loved to Make Vaginas Happy” at Cal Poly Pomona. 

The student reviewer from the Poly Post said it, “led to uncontrollable laughter amongst the crowd as the women presented different types of moans such as the Obama and even the Cal Poly Student moan.”

 

 

 

Women’s History Month – 4 in a series – Malinche

Women's History Month - 4 in a series - Malinche

Malinche does not fit easily into Mexican, Spanish, or American history. She, like innumerable other Mexican women who came after her, was a translator who made possible the communication between Spaniards and Mexican Amerindians. Few of these women have been as prominent as Malinche, chiefly because she was Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés’s (1485–1547) mouthpiece but also because she was the first of her kind. Also, not unlike Pocahontas, Malinche’s story has been used as myth, though in Malinche’s case her story has devolved into a cautionary tale of the dangers of Euro-American and Native American contact.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

My 2nd Year Performing in “The Vagina Monologues” at Cal Poly Pomona

Vagina Monologues Cast 2017

Our monologue (with Peg Lamphier) was mentioned in the Poly Post review (The Vagina Monologues seeks to remove taboos, Poly Post, February 27, 2017) of this year’s The Vagina Monologues, an annual event at Cal Poly Pomona and my second year performing:

“There were also humorous monologues throughout. One, “The Woman Who Loved to Make Vaginas Happy,” featured two women discussing one woman’s realization that she loved to make women moan. This led to uncontrollable laughter amongst the crowd as the women presented different types of moans such as the Obama and even the Cal Poly Student moan.”

You can see us standing in the back of the cast photo (Peg is wearing her pink pussy hat to my right).

Read the entire review