Women’s History Month – 13 in a series – Mary Cassatt

Women's History Month - 13 in a series - Mary Cassatt

As a member of the artist’s group known as the Impressionists, Mary Stevenson Cassatt was a preeminent painter and graphic artist who forged a new image of the “modern” woman and molded American appreciation of art. Cassatt’s iconic works were contemplative portraits, especially of women and children engaged in contemporary activities.

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Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Carrie Fisher’s “The Princess Diarist” [Book]

Carrie Fisher's

Thought I’d read Carrie Fisher’s “The Princess Diarist” for some frothy relaxing fun this weekend and found myself dazed by what a brilliant writer she was at 19. Her opening chapters are all from the recent past year (who knew it would be her last?) and sound like the distinct voice she became as a writer, but her journal entries from the filming of Star Wars are a distinct voice as well, capturing the thrill of obsessive first love better than many authors I’ve read (and I’ve read a LOT of them from Jane Austen to Judy Blume). 

The quality of the poem she wrote about her infatuation with Harrison (how nice to know she was as human as the rest of us and couldn’t resist the smuggler in the Cantina – AND that she had the opportunity to live our ALL our fantasies, so she “Tried not, she DID) will sadly be ignored — both for being written by a celebrity (hey, wasn’t F. Scott a celebrity?) and for being written by a young girl (hey, wasn’t Mary Shelley 19 when she wrote Frankenstein?).

I’d teach this book in a high school literature class if I was still teaching one. For now I recommend it as: ‘can’t put down even though I have scripts to read and grade’.

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Women’s History Month – 12 in a series – Annie Oakley

Women's History Month - 12 in a series - Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley was renowned for her skill as a sharp- shooter and is said to be America’s first female super- star. She toured the United States and Europe in the phenomenally successful Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show. She was generous to charities, especially those assisting children, and despite several critical injuries continued as a record-setting exhibition shooter into her 60s. 

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 11 in a series – Mary Walker

Women's History Month - 11 in a series - Mary Walker

A surgeon for the Union during the American Civil War and the only woman to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, Mary Edwards Walker was born on November 26, 1832, in Oswego Town, New York. Her parents, Vesta Whitcomb and Alvah Walker, held 25 acres of land on which they grew fruits and vegetables for market. The family also kept a library for all five of their daughters to use. As a youth, Walker was interested in Spiritualism and supported abolition, temperance, and women’s rights, including suffrage.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 10 in a series – Julia Ward Howe

Women's History Month - 10 in a series - Julia Ward Howe

Writer Julia Ward Howe’s poem, set to music, became “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” the anthem for the Union cause in the American Civil War. While that piece cemented Howe’s place in American history, her writing career extended well beyond the single work, and with her efforts as an antislavery and women’s rights activist, she became a woman of great historical significance.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 9 in a series – Dorothea Dix

Women's History Month - 9 in a series - Dorothea Dix

Dorothea Lynde Dix was an activist in a variety of social reform movements. Her exposure to the dreadful conditions in U.S. prisons and consequent prison reform efforts led her to seek reforms for the mentally ill, particularly with regard to their treatment in asylums. She trained nurses during the American Civil War (1861–1865) but returned to asylum reform after the war.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Which women writers do you read? — International Women’s Day 2017

Which women writers do you read?

Thinking about International Women’s Day and thinking about how whenever I ask female writers which writers they admired in their youth they often go straight to the boys – F. Scott and Ernest.

Sure, we read all of those boys (because that’s what school gave us) – and we’re welcome to have liked them – but really, WHAT were we reading on our own?

In asking that question, I realized I learned more from Mary Shelley and Margaret Mitchell and Eve Bunting and S.E. Hinton and Agatha Christie and Toni Morrison and Emily Neville and Elizabeth George Speare and Betty Cavanna.  

Which women did you read then?

Which women do you read now?

On YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator’s Corner Season 2 Episode 4

On YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator's Corner Season 2 Episode 4

Watch YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator’s Corner Season 2 Episode 4

I liked this video and think you might find it interesting, too!

Women’s History Month – 8 in a series – Maria Mitchell, Astronomer

Women's History Month - 8 in a series - Maria Mitchell, Astronomer

Maria Mitchell was the first American astronomer to discover a telescopic comet—a comet too far away to see with the naked eye but detectable with a telescope. For her achievement, she was rewarded with a gold medal by the king of Denmark, became the first female member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and later became a professor at Vassar College, one of the first exclusively all-women colleges in America.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 7 in a series – Ellen Craft

Women's History Month - 7 in a series - Ellen Craft

Ellen Craft was a fugitive slave made famous by the daring escape she and her husband William Craft (1824–1900) made in December 1848. Ellen, disguised as an infirm and sickly slaveholding gentleman, and her husband William, posing as a slave servant, traveled from the slaveholding state of Georgia to freedom in Philadelphia. So widely publicized was their escape that the Crafts became world- renowned spokespersons for abolitionism.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian