When Women Wrote Hollywood – 29 in a series – “The Grand Passion (1918), Wr: Ida May Park

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 29 in a series – “The Grand Passion (1918), Wr: Ida May Park

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 29 in a series -

The Grand Passion is a 1918 American silent western film directed by Ida May Park and starring Lon Chaney.[1] It is not known whether the film currently survives.[1]

As described in a film magazine,[2] Dick Evans (Stowell), boss of Powderville, decides to start a newspaper and support it through coerced advertising from the businesses in the town. He hires Jack Ripley (Mulhall), a New York newspaperman, to be its editor. Viola (Phillips), niece of Paul Argos (Chaney), arrives on the same train as Ripley. Forming a relationship with her, Evans decides to clean up the town. In the meantime, Viola has been kidnapped and hidden in a roadhouse on the other side of the tracks. Evans and Ripley rescue her but incur the enmity of the denizens of the district. They attack the newspaper office and, in the face of defeat, Evans orders Ripley to escape with Viola. When she discovers that Evans is missing, she returns to the burning town and discovers him wounded. She declares her love and indications are that he will survive to claim it. — Wikipedia 

More about The Grand Passion (1918)

More about Ida May Park


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When Women Wrote Hollywood – 28 in a series – Ida May Park

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 28 in a series – Ida May Park

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 28 in a series - Ida May Park

Ida May Park (December 28, 1879 – June 13, 1954)[1] was an American screenwriter and film director of the silent era, in the early 20th century. She wrote for more than 50 films between 1914 and 1930, and directed 14 films between 1917 and 1920.[2] She was born and died in Los Angeles, California. She was married to film director and producer Joseph De Grasse, with whom she was regularly teamed at Universal.[3]

Park got her start in the entertainment industry as a stage actress when she was fifteen years old. During her time in the theatre she met her future husband, Joseph De Grasse, also an actor. When Pathé hired De Grasse in 1909, Park was also hired as a writer. Together they were hired by Universal.[4] 

The first screenplay that she wrote was titled A Gypsy Romance which was developed into a short scenario by director Wallace Reid. Reid also directed the next scenario that she wrote, The Man Within.[2] Park then started to work with De Grasse who directed the next several pieces that she wrote. The two worked on multiple shorts and scenarios together over several years. Their first joint project was the short Her Bounty (1914), and their first feature-length film was Father and The Boys (1915). Most of the titles that the two worked on together were for Universal’s Bluebird label.[5] Park made her solo directorial debut in 1917 when she directed The Flashlight[6] starring Universal’s top dramatic actress Dorothy Phillips;[4] after this picture, she and DeGrasse took turns directing Bluebird projects featuring Phillips.[6] She went on to direct 13 more films, many of which were deemed “women’s features”.[7] — Wikipedia 

More about Ida May Park


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Rosanne has a Podcast! Did you know? — Check it out! Dr. Rosanne Welch On Screenwriting and Media

Did you know I have a podcast? 

All the video and audio you see here on the blog and Facebook is also available directly to your computer, tablet or phone automatically when you subscribe for free!

Never miss another talk or clip as I teach and speak around the neighborhood and around the world!

Rosanne has a Podcast! Did you know? Check it out!

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Start by watching my latest talk “Why (and How) I Created a History of Screenwriting Course and NOT a History of Film Course” from the SRN Conference in Milan, Italy on September 15th, 2018

29 Bill Potts and Women Saving The Doctor from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:42)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

29 Bill Potts and Women Saving The Doctor from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:42)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Then finally we ended with the Peter Capaldi era — we ended with Bil Potts, who had the strength — probably spoilers. If you don’t watch the show — you have to watch the show. She ends up being converted into a Cyberman, but she doesn’t — she’s the only person to have that happen to her who doesn’t lose her own humanity. She knows who she is and that isn’t supposed to happen when you’re converted right? Then you/re just a talking robot and nobody cares. So that’s how strong she is. She maintains her humanity in the face of that. So, we’ve had a ton of strong women. A ton of strong women across the years. Busting that gender stereotype that women need to be saved. On Doctor Who mostly women are helping save the day and save him.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
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Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Our “Award Winning” Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection

I’m not one for printed catalogs much these days (to save trees if nothing else) but it was fun when the new ABC-Clio catalog appeared in my mailbox. That’s because it lists the Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection that I co-edited with Peg Lamphier in this catalog. More importantly, it has the happy “Award Winning” banner on its page thanks to our 4 volume set being gamed to the 2018 Outstanding References Sources List, by the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA), a division of the American Library Association.

Nice to have the right to use the phrase ‘Award-Winning” about my own work.

Abc clio american history

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 27 in a series – “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” (1920), Wr: Clara Beranger

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 27 in a series – “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” (1920), Wr: Clara Beranger

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 27 in a series -

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a 1920 horror silent film, produced by Famous Players-Lasky and released through Paramount/Artcraft. The film is based upon Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and starring actor John Barrymore.

The film was directed by John S. Robertson and co-starred Nita Naldi. The scenario was by Clara Beranger and the film is now in the public domain.

Dr. Jekyll, a kind and charitable man, believes that everyone has two sides, one good and one evil, otherwise considered a split personality. Using a potion that he concocted, Dr. Jekykll becomes Mr. Hyde, creating havoc throughout his town.[1][2]

The early part of Jekyll’s initial transformation into Hyde was achieved with no makeup, instead relying solely on Barrymore’s ability to contort his face.[4] In one scene, as Hyde reverts to Jekyll, one of Hyde’s prosthetic fingers can be seen to fly across the screen, having been shaken loose by Barrymore’s convulsions. The character of Millicent Carew does not appear in Stevenson’s original story, but in the 1887 stage version by Thomas Russell Sullivan starring Richard Mansfield. This 1920 film version used the play’s concept of Jekyll being engaged to Carew’s daughter, and Hyde beginning a dalliance with a dance-hall girl. — Wikipedia 

Watch Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

More about Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1920)

More about Clare Beranger


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† Available from the LA Public Library

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 5 in a series – Satirizing sex and love

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 5 in a series - Satirizing sex and love

“Best known for writing ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’, Anita Loos is a great American author, playwright, and screenwriter.  In the silent era, Loos shaped the integral role that intertitles played, and is known for her title work for some of the most acclaimed of movies of the day. She was a master of satirizing sex and love, and was capable of writing rich, multi-faceted females who drove the action in their films.”

Anita Loos: A Girl Like Her

Toni Anita Hull 


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From The Research Vault: Zilch: The Podcast Full of The Monkees – Final Entry In This Series

From The Research Vault: Zilch: The Podcast Full of The Monkees

From The Research Vault: Zilch:  The Podcast Full of The Monkees

We discuss all things Monkees and enjoy Monkee-ing around! Any member can post, and the only rules here are to be nice to each other and to keep the content PG(-ish)!

* I am now a regular contributor to this podcast, too!

Listen to Zilch: The Podcast Full of The Monkees


 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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“When Women Wrote Hollywood” is at the Citizen Jane Film Festival – November 1-4, 2018, Columbia, Missouri

When Women Wrote Hollywood is a collection of 23 essays focused on the lives of female screenwriters of Golden Age Hollywood.

Celebrate the work of these female screenwriters by meeting the authors!

Buy the book, listen to the authors share about their subjects, and get your book signed!

* Citizen Jane Film Festival Badge Not Required – This is a FREE Event!

Join the “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Facebook Event


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

28 Amy Pond from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse with Rosanne Welch Ph.D [Video] (0:59)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

28 Amy Pond from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Then she has to deal with finding out that her baby gets stolen. I mean that’s a long, epic adventure for poor Amy. It’s a lot to put one woman through. At the very end, though, I think the coolest thing in the world is — as much as people wanted to try to say she was going to fall for The Doctor — she and Rory were the first married couple to travel with The Doctor and to leave your husband for another guy would have been cheesy of her and she didn’t think of her Doctor friend in that way. She never stopped loving her husband. Spoiler alert, if you haven’t seen this. At the end of their time with The Doctor we lose Rory to the Weeping Angels who were a cool invention of Steven Moffat and when she finds out that all she has to do is allow herself to be taken by them as well and she’ll end up in the past with him, she gives up her adventuring, exciting life with The Doctor to go with her husband because that’s who she loves and she was going to take that chance and that’s hugely strong. Really, really, hugely strong, I think.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.