When Women Wrote Hollywood – 26 in a series – Clara Beranger

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 26 in a series – Clara Beranger

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 26 in a series - Clare Beranger

Clara Beranger (also Berenger, née Strouse, January 14, 1886 – September 10, 1956) was an American screenwriter of the silent film era and a member of the original faculty of the USC School of Cinematic Arts.

Using the pseudonym of Charles S. Beranger, her first screen employment was as a freelancer, writing for the Edison, Vitagraph and Kalem companies, to whom she furnished many originals as well as continuities. Her success attracted some attention and she was appointed as a staff writer for the Fox Corporation. She wrote several scripts for the popular child star Baby Marie Osborne as well as a much-praised adaptation of A Tale of Two Cities. Beranger also wrote The Interloper for Kitty Gordon, The Bluffer for June Elvidge and The Mirror for Marjorie Rambeau, though many of these films are considered lost.[3] With Forrest Halsey, Beranger wrote the stage play, His Chinese Wife, which received good reviews and became one of the successes of the 1919–1920 season.[3]

In 1921, Clara took Frances, then twelve, and migrated to Hollywood to write for motion pictures,[1] where she signed a long contract with Cecil B. DeMille’s Famous Players-Lasky; the outfit with whom she is most associated. She wrote or contributed to more than 24 DeMille productions, and produced both Come Out of the Kitchen and Girls for Marguerite Clark; Sadie Love and Wanted: A Husband for Billie Burke; Judy of Rogue’s Harbor for Mary Miles Minter; The Fear Market for Alice Brady; The Cost for Violet Heming; Half an Hour for Dorothy Dalton; Civilian Clothes for Thomas Meighan, Notoriety for Bebe Daniels and the long-lasting classic Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde for John Barrymore.[3] — Wikipedia 

Watch a movie by Clara Beranger

More about Clara Beranger


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Khanisha Foster, Author of “The Nature and Genius of Alice Guy Blaché” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” [Video] (2:56)

Watch the complete When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Khanisha Foster, Author of

Khanisha Foster, Author of “The Nature and Genius of Alice Guy Blaché” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood”

When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event
August 11, 2018 at the Jim Henson Studios, where the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program resides.

These 23 essays cover a range of female screenwriters from the early years of film through the 1940s, women whose work helped create the unforgettable stories and characters beloved generations of audiences but whose names have been left out of most film histories. Not this one. This collection is dedicated to those women and written by a group of women grateful to stand on the shoulders of those who came before – as a beacon to those who will come after.

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.


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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

27 River Song from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:33)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

River Song from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:33)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

River Song is, of course, an invention of Steven Moffat. Right? and she’s super strong. She died twice — well, she dies once completely to help save The Doctor and the second time she gives all her regeneration power to Matt Smith’s Doctor, so he won’t die. Literally sacrifices her own chance to regenerate ten more times so that he won’t die. You can’t get much stronger than that. That is coming to Prince Charmings rescue. That’s the Princess coming to the rescue of the guy. I mean that’s huge and that’s written by Steven Moffat. So I think that’s worth noting.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Julie Berkobien, Author of “Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett: The Most Beloved Couple in Hollywood” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” [Video] (2:40)

Watch the complete When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Julie Berkobien, Author of

Julie Berkobien, Author of “Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett: The Most Beloved Couple in Hollywood” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood”

When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event
August 11, 2018 at the Jim Henson Studios, where the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program resides.

These 23 essays cover a range of female screenwriters from the early years of film through the 1940s, women whose work helped create the unforgettable stories and characters beloved generations of audiences but whose names have been left out of most film histories. Not this one. This collection is dedicated to those women and written by a group of women grateful to stand on the shoulders of those who came before – as a beacon to those who will come after.

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Scenes from When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Scenes from When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Scenes from When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.

Follow Rosanne Welch on Instagram


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The Lives of Margaret Fuller

Reading about Margaret Fuller (transcendentalist writer and first foreign correspondent — female or male ever!)

I found she was in Rome during the Risorgimento of 1849 and called on America to send a smart ambassador to Rome, writing:

“Another century and I might ask to be made Ambassador myself, but woman’s day has not yet come.”

She was about right. In 1953 Clare Booth Luce (playwright known for ‘The Women’, elected to the House of Representatives in 1942, ) became the first female ambassador to Rome. Margaret was only off by 5 years.

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Sarah Phillips, Author of “Screenwriter, Producer, and Director: Marion Fairfax” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” [Video] (3:04)

Watch the complete When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Sarah Phillips, Author of

Sarah Phillips, Author of “Screenwriter, Producer, and Director: Marion Fairfax” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood”

When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event
August 11, 2018 at the Jim Henson Studios, where the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program resides.

These 23 essays cover a range of female screenwriters from the early years of film through the 1940s, women whose work helped create the unforgettable stories and characters beloved generations of audiences but whose names have been left out of most film histories. Not this one. This collection is dedicated to those women and written by a group of women grateful to stand on the shoulders of those who came before – as a beacon to those who will come after.

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 4 in a series – A start in pictures

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 4 in a series - A start in pictures

“The resounding mythology around the start of Macpherson’s film career is that she, with immeasurable pluck, simply walked into D.W. Griffith’s office and waited for him for days on end. Finally, the assistant asked about her. “I told him my stage experience. He ignored it, scorned it. ‘We want to know what you can do before a camera,’ he said.”

Jeanie Macpherson: A Life Unknown by Amelia Phillips


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

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From The Research Vault: Bechdel Rule still applies to portrayal of women in films by Sarah Wilson, Jun 28, 2012

From The Research Vault: Bechdel Rule still applies to portrayal of women in films by Sarah Wilson, Jun 28, 2012

The representation of women in film is often troublesome at best. Hollywood films are often extremely gendered and lack adequate female representation. Male characters greatly outnumber female characters in many films, and female characters in movies are frequently underdeveloped and greatly lack any real depth.

When women are present in film, they are often presented only in relation to men. So even when there are multiple female characters in a film, they mostly only discuss their boyfriend, husband, father or brother. Because of this, cartoonist Alison Bechdel wrote a set of rules in her comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For” that could help determine whether a film presents fully formed female characters.

Read Bechdel Rule still applies to portrayal of women in films by Sarah Wilson, Jun 28, 2012


 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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When Women Wrote Hollywood – 25 in a series – “Don’t Tell Everything”, Wr: Lorna Moon, Dir: Sam Wood (1921)

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 25 in a series – “Don’t Tell Everything”, Wr: Lorna Moon, Dir: Sam Wood (1921)

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 25 in a series -

Don’t Tell Everything is a 1921 American silent drama film directed by Sam Wood and starring Gloria Swanson and Wallace Reid. Wood apparently created this film in part from outtakes left over from Cecil DeMille’s The Affairs of Anatol (1921).[1] Wikipedia 

Marian Westover ( Gloria Swanson ) is loved by wealthy young Cullen Dale ( Wallace Reid ) and his best friend, Harvey Gilroy ( Elliott Dexter ), but the latter’s loyalty to Dale keeps him silent. After they both sustain injuries in a polo game, Cullen shows particular solicitude in caring for his friend. Cullen proposes to and is accepted by Marian, but she becomes jealous of his former girl friends, and when Jessica Ramsey ( Dorothy Cumming ) arrives and tries to capture Cullen, Marian fails in emulating her athletic prowess. Jessica invites the couple to a mountain lodge, but when Marian refuses to go Cullen sweeps her into an automobile and has a marriage ceremony performed. She returns home, and Cullen goes on to the lodge, keeping his marriage secret. A storm prevents Cullen from returning home, and Marian, in alarm, enlists the aid of Gilroy; at the lodge everything is explained to the satisfaction of all but Jessica.

This 1921 silent comedy/drama directed by Sam Wood, starring Wallace Reid and Gloria Swanson. Produced by the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation. The film began as an outtake sequence from Cecil B. DeMille’s The Affairs of Anatol (1921), and was expanded by director Sam Wood into a new feature. The survival status of Don’t Tell Everything (1921) is listed in the American Silent Feature Film Database as; No holdings located in archives. — Pamala Short, IMDB Information Page

More about “Don’t Tell Everything”

More about Lorna Moon


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library