Laura Kirk, Author of “Smart Girl In Charge: Eve Unsell” and “Marriage of Words: Bella And Sam Spewack” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” [Video] (2:59)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bd7zbzDOCOE

Laura Kirk, Author of “Smart Girl In Charge: Eve Unsell” and “Marriage of Words: Bella And Sam Spewack” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood

When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event
August 11,2 018 at the Jim Henson Studios, where the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program resides.

These 23 essays cover a range of female screenwriters from the early years of film through the 1940s, women whose work helped create the unforgettable stories and characters beloved generations of audiences but whose names have been left out of most film histories. Not this one. This collection is dedicated to those women and written by a group of women grateful to stand on the shoulders of those who came before – as a beacon to those who will come after.

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 24 in a series – Lorna Moon (Nora Helen Wilson Low)

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 24 in a series – Lorna Moon (Nora Helen Wilson Low)

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 24 in a series - Lorna Moon (Nora Helen Wilson Low)

Lorna Moon (born Nora Helen Wilson Low; 16 June 1886 – 1 May 1930[1]) was a Scottish author and screenwriter from the early days of Hollywood.

An anecdote tells how she contacted Cecil B. DeMille and offered a critical appraisal of the screenplays of the day. He challenged her to come to Hollywood and write them herself if she thought she could do better; and by 1921 she did just that, working as a script girl and screenwriter. During her career in Hollywood she had a third child by Cecil B. DeMille’s brother William. This child, Richard, grew up unaware of his mother’s identity; in later years he discovered his parentage and wrote the memoir My Secret Mother, Lorna Moon.[2] Lorna Moon contracted tuberculosis and died in a sanatorium in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in 1930, aged 44.Wikipedia 

More about Lorna Moon


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Toni Anita Hull, Author of “Anita Loos: A Girl Like Her” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” [Video] (2:42)

Toni Anita Hull, Author of

Toni Anita Hull, Author of “Anita Loos: A Girl Like Her” from “When Women Wrote Hollywood”

When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event
August 11,2 018 at the Jim Henson Studios, where the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program resides.

These 23 essays cover a range of female screenwriters from the early years of film through the 1940s, women whose work helped create the unforgettable stories and characters beloved generations of audiences but whose names have been left out of most film histories. Not this one. This collection is dedicated to those women and written by a group of women grateful to stand on the shoulders of those who came before – as a beacon to those who will come after.

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Ken LaZebnik, Director of the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting via Instagram

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Ken LaZebnik, Director of the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting via Instagram

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Ken LaZebnik, Director of the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.

Follow Rosanne Welch on Instagram


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 3 in a series – Beyond the glamour

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 3 in a series - Beyond the glamour

“When interviewing Hollywood stars, St. Johns saw beyond the glamour. She knew the extravagant woman on the red carpet was not that different from the average woman. Both fight to make a living and that battle is worthy of recognition.”

Adela Rogers St. Johns: Survival of the Feisty by Sarah Whorton


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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When Women Wrote Hollywood – 23 in a series – From the Manger to the Cross (1912), Wr: Gene Gauntier, Dir: Sidney Olcott

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 23 in a series – From the Manger to the Cross (1912), Wr: Gene Gauntier, Dir: Sidney Olcott

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 23 in a series - From the Manger to the Cross (1912), Wr: Gene Cauntier, Dir: Sidney Olcott

 From the Manger to the Cross or Jesus of Nazareth is a 1912 American motion picture that was filmed on location in Egypt and in Palestine.[1] It tells the story of Jesus’ life. Directed by Sidney Olcott who also appeared in the film, actress and screenwriter Gene Gauntier wrote the script and portrayed the Virgin Mary.

The film received excellent reviews at the time of its original release. After Vitagraph Studios acquired Kalem, the film was re-released in February 1919.[2]

Herbert Reynolds has shown[3] how Olcott used James Tissot’s illustrations for his The Life of our Saviour Jesus Christ (1896-1897)[4] as the basis for numerous shots in the film. The head of Kalem, Frank J. Marion, presented a copy to the troupe as they departed for the Middle East.[3]

According to Turner Classic Movies, the film cost $35,000 to produce (roughly between $1,600,000 and $3,300,000 adjusted to 2007 dollars);[5] another source[6] says that Olcott spent $100,000 of his own money on the project. Although the film’s profits eventually amounted to almost $1 million (roughly $46,000,000 to $95,000,000), the Kalem directors refused to increase Olcott’s basic salary and he resigned.

In later years, Louis B. Mayer, head of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, would say this was the premiere film for his movie theater in Haverhill, Massachusetts and a major boost for him in the movie business.[7] However, most sources place the release date of this film as 1912, long after the opening of Mayer’s theater.[8]

At around 5,000 feet it was one of the longer films to be released to date,[6][9][10] although the Kinemacolor documentary With Our King and Queen Through India released in February 1912 ran to 16,000 feet;[11] and another religious film The Miracle (the first full-colour feature film) – was released in the UK at 7,000 feet in December 1912.[12] Wikipedia 

Watch From the Manger to the Cross

More about From the Manger to the Cross

More about Gene Gauntier


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Scenes from When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event via My Instagram

Scenes from When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event via My Instagram

Scenes from When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.

Follow Rosanne Welch on Instagram


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 22 in a series – Gene Gauntier

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 22 in a series – Gene Gauntier

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 22 in a series - Gene Gauntier

 Gene Gauntier (May 17, 1885 – December 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter and actress who was one of the pioneers of the motion picture industry. A writer, director and actress in films from mid 1906 to 1920, she wrote screenplays for 31 films. She performed in 28 films and is credited as the director of The Grandmother (1909).

In 1912, Gene Gauntier married actor Jack J. Clark. They were divorced in 1918, and after writing forty-two screenplays and performing in eighty-seven films, in 1920 at age thirty-five, Gauntier walked away from the business. She had a brother, Richard Gauntier Liggett and a sister, Marguerite Gauntier Liggett. Marguerite married wealthy Swedish industrialist Axel Wenner-Gren in 1909.

The tomb of Gene Gauntier at Häringe Slot, Sweden
Gauntier had sailed to Europe frequently where her sister Marguerite was an opera singer who had trained and worked in Germany, and found herself stranded there when World War I broke out. After leaving filmmaking, she returned to live in Europe where she remained for a number of years while writing her autobiography, Blazing the Trail. The work was serialized in 1928–29 in the American magazine, Woman’s Home Companion, and the manuscript is on display in the Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Gauntier also penned two novels, Cabbages and Harlequins in 1929 and Sporting Lady in 1933.

 Wikipedia 

Watch a movie by Gene Gauntier

More about Gene Gauntier


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Waiting to have their books signed – When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Waiting to have their books signed - When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Waiting to have their books signed – When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.

Follow Rosanne Welch on Instagram


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

“When Women Wrote Hollywood” Book Launch Event [Video] (31:40)

 

When Women Wrote Hollywood Book Launch Event
August 11,2 018 at the Jim Henson Studios, where the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program resides.

These 23 essays cover a range of female screenwriters from the early years of film through the 1940s, women whose work helped create the unforgettable stories and characters beloved generations of audiences but whose names have been left out of most film histories. Not this one. This collection is dedicated to those women and written by a group of women grateful to stand on the shoulders of those who came before – as a beacon to those who will come after.

Many thanks to the essay contributors who joined us and spoke so eloquently about the women writers they had researched: Toni Anita Hull, Laura Kirk, Amelia Phillips, Sarah Phillips, Julie Berkobien, Khanisha Foster, Lauren Smith, and to Cari Beauchamp, who wrote the Forward to the collection.


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library