Video: Anti-Materialism from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Very briefly, anti-materialism. This sign was is their room — their apartment — money is the root of all evil. That’s not what were about at all in this program. In fact, they have this marvelous episode called “The Devil and Peter Tork” which has to with Peter selling his soul to the Devil for the talent of playing a harp which he fell in love with at a pawn shop and in the end, they prove to the Devil — they take the Devil to Court to get his soul back and they say, “You never gave him anything. He had the talent within him all the time. He didn’t want fame and fortune. He just wanted his music.” Right, and I love that. “If you love music, you can play it. All it takes is love.” Here’s the Hippy phrase of the period. “Baby in the final analysis, love is power. That’s where the power is at.” It’s “Make Love, Not War!” I mean, it’s all right there built into the storyline. Of course, and old piece of literature right? We’ve got the Devil.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Event: “How Who Redefined Masculinity – The Doctors and their Male Companions” at Cal Poly Pomona

At Cal Poly Pomona Today for “How Who Redefined Masculinity – The Doctors and their Male Companions” #doctorwho

Cal Poly Pomona University Library Classroom 1807, First Floor

 

drwho-masculinity

Video: …lay down on the grass and be cool. from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

…Also then, they save the plant before the bad human, you know, of course, our boys are the heros. They save the plant and the, the smoke that the plant creates? If you ingest it make you not want to fight anymore — just lay down in the grass and be cool. I mean, if that’s not an anti-authority, let’s all go smoke pot message, I’m no sure… and yet here it is on mainstream television for pre-teens — for 12 to 13-year-olds. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Zor and Zam from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers



Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Here is a lovely little bit of dialog. “They want to put the blame on teenagers. Take the war, for example. Whose fault is it? Not ours. We’re not fighting. It must be those crazy kids. They’re the ones doing all the fighting.” I mean, this is not just vaudeville happening. This is serious political commentary in the course of a teenage comedy show. You didn’t get that on Full House when that was the big program in American television. Now, my favorite funny part is in the very last episode of the show, so they got away with a lot. It starred this alien plant. If you look at it a little more closely, it resembles a plant that one wasn’t supposed to know much about. In fact, only in certain state now are we supposed to know about it. This plant has come and its power is being taken over by a bad human who’s using it to rule the world. Right? I think that’s funny. In the midst of this particular episode, they even have this anti-war song that they chant during a montage in the show and if you just take a peek at that for a minute, it’s kind of beautiful. I particularly like the last line, “Two little kinds playing a game. They gave a war and nobody came, ” which is the — it starts with a game and no one shows up, so the 2 kings are all alone. So, here we have this marvelous anti-war song in the midst of this.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Tegan Jovanka from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

We had Romana, a female Timelord. The only one we’re going to see in the course of the show. And we move on to Tegan. Very interesting. Very fun character. Very tough. However, the best job that we can give her in this period is she’s a flight attendent. That’s the coolest job we can give a woman. She’s not the pilot, right? She’s not even a military woman. She’s a flight attendent. Which is not a bad job. My friend has that job but even she says to me, “It’s pretty much Denny’s waitressing in the sky.” Now, it’s not. She gets trained to do all kinds of important things of there’s a crash and what not, but that’s the job we find ourselves giving the female in this period. Not an entirely, you know, super-intellectual job. I will say, it kind of interesting that the uniform and the idea that a woman in uniform — a person in uniform — is someone of power. That’s something visually that made them happy.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

Walking over the Monkees’ Star on the Walk of Fame

The Monkees Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

On our way to the Cupcake Theatre today to see their performance of Avenue Q I realized we were walking over the names of so many of the actors of our childhood.  Then I further realized that I had yet to check the address of the star given to The Monkees in 1989 following three years of fan reaction to all the hoopla started by MTV in 1986 when they began rerunning all the episodes for the 20th anniversary of the show (during which time I stayed home all the days of the Pleasant Valley Weekend and used my VCR to capture all my favorite episodes).  

Turned out we were only a couple blocks from the star and so we checked it out on the way back to the Hollywood and Highland center. The Monkees’ star sits quite respectably at 6675 Hollywood Blvd, right in front of the Vogue Theatre where Head premiered and as I remembered, it is a star with a little television box in the middle, adding to the thesis of my book which is that their television program was just as important – if not moreso – than their work as a band.   

It was weird to imagine all the people in the street on the day they received the star – but not hard to do since thanks to YouTube I have seen video footage taken that day of the speeches each actor/musician gave and heard the cheers of the crowd.  What a nice experience for all those fans – and how fun to know now, in hindsight, that the diehard folks were going to be treated to continued reunion tours every so many years right up to today when I’ve been able to take my son to see them – and to read articles by all kinds of people – from Penn Jillette to Rachel Maddow – talking about how much they, too, loved the show.  

Video: Many of our leaders blame us from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

I just like pictures of script to remember that there is a writer involved. I know the words are too small, but this is a script by Coslough Johnson. All the writers on the show, I have a whole chapter in my book on authorship — all the writers ended up winning Emmys later in life. He got his for writing on Laugh In, which was also a very politically themed show. He wrote an episode called “Monkees Watch Their Feet” and it’s about aliens taking over the teenagers of America. So, The Monkees are going to save the day for them. So, first of all, we have this patriotic business going on here — here is standing Mike Nesmith, with the flag and Pat Paulsen who, if you remember, comically ran for President back in the day. He’s giving a report to America about what’s wrong with teenagers today. It is that the aliens have taken over, but he talks about who we blame. “Many of us blame our leaders. Many of our leaders blame us.” This is ho the teenagers, the hippy culture, is feeling. Then more so, he defines Micky in this episode, as “Someone tormented by a war he must fight in a country thousands of miles away.” How can you get away with dissing the Vietnam War on modern American television in 1967? And they just blip it right through and you don’t even notice it.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Mary Tamm and Lalla Ward from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Another look at — Mary Tamm can be intellectually as smart as he is and do all the things he does, but look at this fluffy piece of stuff she’s got to wear. He never wears anything full of feathers. We never see him come out in his boxer shorts after a shower on the Tardis. This is a problem. Right? This is a problem. So, this is Mary Tamm, Romana I, who gets changed into this actress Lalla Ward. Now, think about the difference in these two women and what they’re giving us. They cast this actress specifically “to get a softer, less bossy, woman. They wanted someone less — and bossy is a big word these days, right? We’ve been talking a lot about what does bossy mean and why are girls bossy and boys are not. Boys are leaders. Girls are bossy. This is nonsense. So that’s a perfect example of how they went. They went forward and they got slapped back — a little bit. Happens all the time. A couple steps forward. A couple steps back. What’s really sad about Lalla Ward is she’s mostly famous because she married Tom Baker. So completely identified by the man  in her life who is actually the man she married and then they got separated.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

Video: The Domino Theory from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers




Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

…but, for instance, in one episode the boys are all, as you can see, playing dominos. When tehy knock all the dominos down one of them says, “What do you call this game?” and the other answers, “Southeast Asia.” Hello, how did they get away with that? The censors weren’t even listening. They weren’t noticing the political aspect of that and what I really love is the politics came with the commercials for cornflakes. so, this is why people thought is was something they didn’t have to pay attention to. It’s just nonsense entertainment, but we’re talking about a war in the middle of it..

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: The Sarah Jane Adventures from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch



Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Sarah Jane Adventures — very interesting. I wills say — it was a child’s program — a child’d version of Doctor Who. It was quite fun. I will say, from a feminist perspective, we do still need a man in her life, but it’s her son. She adopts an alien boy who is a humanoid, yes, she becomes the mother of an alien kid and together they solve the crises happening to Earth. So, it’s interesting, but of course, being the mother of the child she is always the one in control. So, there’s that change going on there. So Sarah Jane might just be the most feminist companion The Doctor has ever had. She might be. We’re not sure yet.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel