Video: Cultural Collateral of The Monkees from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Then I have a chapter on cultural collateral — how much The Monkees still resonate in American culture. We don’t think so, but my gosh they do — particularly right after the show was cancelled. This is a year-and-a-half later. This is the most — I’m understood from the research I found — and when Davy Jones died in 2012 they announced this on CNN. This is the most re-run episode of television in the history of reruns and it’s this episode of The Brady Bunch, where Marcia Brady has written a letter to her — she’s the head of the Davy Jones Fan Club — and she wants him to sing at their Prom and he didn’t get the letter on time and so he isn’t going to come and her whole life is going to be ruined and when he finds out accidentally, he comes to her and says, “Ok, yes, as a matter of fact I can do that, but I need a date. Do you know anybody who’d like to go with me?” This is the most rerun episode of television ever and it’s all based on love of The Monkees. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Jimi Hendrix and The Monkees from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers



Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

The Monkees are also famous for introducing Jimi Hendrix to the mainstream. He was their opening act when they went on a concert tour around the country. Jimi Hendrix opened for The Monkees. Nobody believes me. (Laughter) I’m not making that up. He really truly did. So, again, Micky Dolenz as a character and as a performer is bringing Black music to the mainstream, white, teenage, audience. That’s a huge thing their parents might not have allowed. but the program was their gateway into that new world.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Mindful(l) Media 6: Why I Should Love Grace and Frankie, but I don’t — yet, My Ode to Buffy the Vampire Slayer and an Interview with D. Lynn Smith Founder of Kymera Press

Mindful(l) Media is a new show and podcast from Dr. Rosanne Welch helping the audience to be more Mindfull about the Media we both create and consume as it relates to the portrayal of Gender, Diversity, and Equality.

Subscribe via iTunes today

Mindful(l) Media 6: Grace & Frankie, Buffy, & ComicBooks

On today’s show:

  • Why I Should Love Grace and Frankie, but I don’t — yet.
  • My Ode to Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • Interview with D. Lynn Smith Founder of Kymera Press – publishing Comics written and drawn by women for readers of all genders
  • See the complete show notes at 3rd Pass Media

More after this…

Listen to Mindful(l) Media 6: Grace & Frankie, Buffy, & ComicBooks

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. While I watched hours and hours of television in my childhood, I also read tons of books – and as a professor I have found that you can easily tell the readers from the non-readers by their spelling and their level of vocabulary so I always tell students to find time to read. It’s also deeply peaceful to get lost in a story. If you love audio books you can support us here at 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100, 000 books.

Including one of my favorites, Enough Rope with Andrew Denton which includes a great interview with Lily Tomlin.  Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.


Mindful(l)l Media is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media

If you have any questions or comments please send them to mindfull@3rdpass.media or via Twitter @mindfullmedia

Video: Micky As Cultural Substitute from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

Monkees 16 cultural substitute anim

Book mentioned in this clip:

Feeling Italian: The Art of Ethnicity in America (Nation of Nations) by Thomas Ferraro

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

So, I learned as a child — think, or that’s what I posit — that if I wanted to marry a Monkee, I didn’t want to be popular. I wanted to be substantial. I wanted to be a woman of some meaning and that’s what would attract them. And I think that’s a really important message to give little girls. Not that I need to be gorgeous and have the perfect little outfit, right? So feminism is all through this thing. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Substantial Women from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

Monkees 15 substantial women anim

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

So, I learned as a child — think, or that’s what I posit — that if I wanted to marry a Monkee, I didn’t want to be popular. I wanted to be substantial. I wanted to be a woman of some meaning and that’s what would attract them. And I think that’s a really important message to give little girls. Not that I need to be gorgeous and have the perfect little outfit, right? So feminism is all through this thing. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Mindful(l) Media 5: A Big Bang Theory Failure & The F-Ability of Women and Part 3 of an interview with Any Day Now creator, Nancy Miller

Mindful(l) Media is a new show and podcast from Dr. Rosanne Welch helping the audience to be more Mindfull about the Media we both create and consume as it relates to the portrayal of Gender, Diversity, and Equality.

Subscribe via iTunes today

Minedful(l) Media Episode 6  

On today’s show:

  • How the Writers Failed the Character of Amy Farrah Fowler on Big Bang Theory
    Is this focus on the f-ability of women a good thing…. or a bad thing… or just an old unsolvable thing?
  • See the complete show notes at 3rd Pass Media

More after this…


Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. While I watched hours and hours of television in my childhood, I also read tons of books – and as a professor I have found that you can easily tell the readers from the non-readers by their spelling and their level of vocabulary so I always tell students to find time to read. It’s also deeply peaceful to get lost in a story. If you love audio books you can support us here at 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100, 000 books.

Including one of my favorites, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, narrated by Kate Burton. Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.


Mindful(l)l Media is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media

If you have any questions or comments please send them to mindfull@3rdpass.media or via Twitter @mindfullmedia

Video: Feminist Characters from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

Monkees 14 feminist characters

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

The very first woman that we met was the Princess of the Duchy of Harmonica. So, we’re being funny, but she was a princess who had the opportunity to marry Davy Jones — every girl’s dream in that period. She turned it down because she had a duty to her country to go home and be its ruler. If that’s not an empowered young woman — what a cool thing, right? And then just very imply Julie Newmar who you know as the Catwoman from Batman she guests on an episode where they all wanted her to fall in love with them and the line was, “The fastest way to a woman’s heart is through her mind.” Through her mind! And so each boy tries to do the things she claims to enjoy. Poetry, classical music, ballet, all these high end things, not some silly nonsense.  

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Feminism from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Feminism is what struck me, because we’re all little girls watching this program and because of the way TV today. something that I — I do enjoy The Big Bang Theory, but really it’s a show about who’s going to have sex with which girl this week and that’s kind of what happens to females on TV sometimes these days. Because we had rules back in the day. Four musicians should be about that, too, and yet they weren’t. Every girl that they met on this program in 58 episodes had her own job, took care of herself, was going to school, cared about the culture, and the world, was involved insocial justice issues. Nobody was a cheerleader. Nobody was “Rah, Rah, Look at me! I’ma ditzy blonde and I have no brain.” They were all intelligent, interesting, young women. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Mindful(l) Media Episode 4: Othering and Belonging Conference and Part 2 of an interview with Any Day Now creator and writer, Nancy Miller

Mindful(l) Media is a new show and podcast from Dr. Rosanne Welch helping the audience to be more Mindfull about the Media we both create and consume as it relates to the portrayal of Gender, Diversity, and Equality.

Subscribe via iTunes today

  Mm4 sq

On today’s show:

  • A discussion of the first annual Othering and Belonging Conference — what it means to us as media professionals – and viewers
  • Part 2 of my interview with Nancy Miller, creator of Any Day Now and Saving Grace who is currently working on a miniseries about the Tulsa, Oklahoma race riots of 1921 (something clearly caused by othering)
  • See the complete show notes at 3rd Pass Media

More after this…


Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. While I watched hours and hours of television in my childhood, I also read tons of books – and as a professor I have found that you can easily tell the readers from the non-readers by their spelling and their level of vocabulary so I always tell students to find time to read. It’s also deeply peaceful to get lost in a story. If you love audio books you can support us here at 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100, 000 books.

Including one of my favorites, Parting the Waters: America in the King Years read by Joe Morton and CCH Pounder (who I loved in the Shield and love on NCIS: New Orleans).Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.


Mindful(l)l Media is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media

If you have any questions or comments please send them to mindfull@3rdpass.media or via Twitter @mindfullmedia

Video: Androgynous Clothing from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers



Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

This is my androgynous clothing slide, just to cover that for a moment. The poncho. The colors. I mean how could you do that? This is in their second season. In their first season they appeared like that. Much more 50’s-ish verging on  early 60’s. A little Frankie Valli thing going on. So look at the change that was brought to their viewers in just one season where you could see truly the Hippie Culture in its clothing.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.