From The Research Vault: The Monkees” and the Deconstruction of Television Realism. Journal of Popular Film & Television

From The Research Vault: The Monkees” and the Deconstruction of Television Realism. Journal of Popular Film & Television

From The Research Vault: The Monkees 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 33 in a series – A Trip to the Moon (George Méliès, France, 1902)

A History of Screenwriting – 33 in a series – A Trip to the Moon (George Méliès, France, 1902)

A History of Screenwriting - 33 in a series - A Trip to the Moon (George Méliès, France, 1902)

A Trip to the Moon (FrenchLe Voyage dans la Lune)[a] is a 1902 French silent film directed by Georges Méliès. Inspired by a wide variety of sources, including Jules Verne‘s novels From the Earth to the Moon and Around the Moon, the film follows a group of astronomers who travel to the Moon in a cannon-propelled capsule, explore the Moon’s surface, escape from an underground group of Selenites (lunar inhabitants), and return to Earth with a captive Selenite. It features an ensemble cast of French theatrical performers, led by Méliès himself in the main role of Professor Barbenfouillis, and is filmed in the overtly theatrical style for which Méliès became famous.

The film was an internationally popular success on its release, and was extensively pirated by other studios, especially in the United States. Its unusual length, lavish production values, innovative special effects, and emphasis on storytelling were markedly influential on other film-makers and ultimately on the development of narrative film as a whole. Scholars have commented upon the film’s extensive use of pataphysical and anti-imperialist satire, as well as on its wide influence on later film-makers and its artistic significance within the French theatrical féerie tradition. Though the film disappeared into obscurity after Méliès’s retirement from the film industry, it was rediscovered around 1930, when Méliès’s importance to the history of cinema was beginning to be recognized by film devotees. An original hand-colored print was discovered in 1993 and restored in 2011.

A Trip to the Moon was named one of the 100 greatest films of the 20th century by The Village Voice, ranked 84th.[6] The film remains the best-known of the hundreds of films made by Méliès, and the moment in which the capsule lands in the Moon’s eye remains one of the most iconic and frequently referenced images in the history of cinema. It is widely regarded as the earliest example of the science fiction film genre and, more generally, as one of the most influential films in cinema history. — Wikipedia



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I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

14: More On Michael Nesmith and The Monkees : “Why The Monkees Matter” Interview with Jean Power [Video] (1:00)

Rosanne Welch talks about “Why The Monkees Matter” with Jean Hopkins Power

Watch this entire presentation (45 mins)

Jean Powergirl takes the host reigns and welcomes her guest Rosanne Welch, PhD to the show! They’ll be discussing Roseanne’s book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture.”

14: More On Michael Nesmith and The Monkees : “Why The Monkees Matter” Interview with Jean Power

 

Transcript:

Rosanne: One of the interesting things — it was the first show that had a set of teenagers who didn’t have a father figure or a mother who looked over them and watched over them. And Peter Tork has often said that that’s one of the things that attracted teenagers that they saw teenagers living independently and out current teenagers think of themselves as 16 and 17. These guys are 18-19 — those are still considered teenagers because you still had to wait until you were 21 to vote. You were not a full adult and…

Jean: …and if kids didn’t go to college or join the military, they still lived with their parents in American culture and they have a job and they have to do things.

Rosanne: So they were teenagers.

Jean: Isn’t he the one whos mother invented Liquid Paper? Yes, that’s always…so, the funny thing was he wasn’t going to get that inheritance till later in life. So he didn’t have much cash as a young man. He got on the show and made a ton of cash and has admitted in other interviews that he spent it all on cars and pretty much bankrupted himself when everything was done and had to revive — he began a video company in Northern California that was very successful and so he’s quite well off these days.

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A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966-1968) earned two Emmys–Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy. Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.

This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers. Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces.

Rosanne Welch, PhD has written for television (Touched by an Angel, Picket Fences) and print (Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space). In the documentary world she has written and produced Bill Clinton and the Boys Nation Class of 1963 for ABC NEWS/Nightline and consulted on PBS’s A Prince Among Slaves, the story of a prince from West Africa who was enslaved in the 1780s, freed by order of President John Quincy Adams in the 1820s and returned to his homeland.

From The Research Vault: Why we grieve teen idols: A tribute to Davy Jones, CNN, March 1, 2012

From The Research Vault: Why we grieve teen idols: A tribute to Davy Jones, CNN, March 1, 2012

From The Research Vault: Why we grieve teen idols: A tribute to Davy Jones, CNN, March 1, 2012

Davy Jones was more than just the star of countless bedroom wall collages in the late 1960s. The Monkees frontman and token Brit who captivated audiences with his talent and charisma was the quintessential teen heartthrob. News of Jones’ passing (he died of a heart attack at age 66 Wednesday) prompted nostalgic outbursts from fans, all wanting to reminisce about the Tiger Beat and 16 Magazine covers, the hours logged in front of the TV, and the moments spent bopping around to “Pleasant Valley Sunday.”

Read the entire article

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 32 in a series – Long Distance Wireless Photography (George Méliès, France, 1908)

A History of Screenwriting – 32 in a series – Long Distance Wireless Photography (George Méliès, France, 1908)

A History of Screenwriting - 32 in a series - Long Distance Wireless Photography (George Méliès, France, 1905)

Into a photography studio full of large fantastic machines steps an elderly couple. The bearded proprietor explains the equipment and gives them a demonstration and projects a painting of three women onto a large screen; suddenly the women begin to move. The customers are impressed. First the women sits in the special seat: she’s projected onto the screen, and her good nature comes out in the laughing image. Then it’s the man’s turn, but on the screen it projects a painted, apelike Friar Tuck face. The man gets angry and tries to wreck the machine getting an electric jolt in the process. – Silent Film House



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 69 in a series – Parodying All Genres

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Unlike Get Smart where the only genre they parodied was spy thriller, on The Monkees the writers were free to parody them all, again keeping the audience guessing.  Across the run of the show they would parody Hollywood films, gangster movies, monster movies, racing films, motorcycle sagas and a slew of other styles. 

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

13 : Michael Nesmith and The Monkees : “Why The Monkees Matter” Interview with Jean Power [Video] (0:35)

Rosanne Welch talks about “Why The Monkees Matter” with Jean Hopkins Power

Watch this entire presentation (45 mins)

Jean Powergirl takes the host reigns and welcomes her guest Rosanne Welch, PhD to the show! They’ll be discussing Roseanne’s book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture.”

13 : Michael Nesmith and The Monkees : “Why The Monkees Matter” Interview with Jean Power

 

Transcript:

Jean: So let’s talk about the individual Monkees, all right. Again, here they are again. So tell us — who is this guy right here.

Rosanne: On the end there you see Michael Nesmith. he was from Texas and had come to Los Angeles to be a rock and roll singer. He hosted at a couple of clubs in town. He would host open mic nights and whatnot for local rock bands and he had written Different Drum which is the song Linda Ronstadt msde famous. So he was looking for a job and a career as a singer-songwriter.

Jean: …and already had the talent obviously.

Rosanne: Exactly….when the audition came up and basically hey, who doesn’t want extra cash. So he auditioned and he was cast.

Get your copy today!

A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966-1968) earned two Emmys–Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy. Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.

This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers. Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces.

Rosanne Welch, PhD has written for television (Touched by an Angel, Picket Fences) and print (Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space). In the documentary world she has written and produced Bill Clinton and the Boys Nation Class of 1963 for ABC NEWS/Nightline and consulted on PBS’s A Prince Among Slaves, the story of a prince from West Africa who was enslaved in the 1780s, freed by order of President John Quincy Adams in the 1820s and returned to his homeland.

From The Research Vault: Fresh Off ‘Frozen,’ Bobby Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez Prepare a New Musical. New York Times

From The Research Vault: Fresh Off ‘Frozen,’ Bobby Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez Prepare a New Musical. New York Times

From The Research Vault: Fresh Off ‘Frozen,’ Bobby Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez Prepare a New Musical. New York Times

LA JOLLA, CALIF. — The songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez are rushing to catch a performance. It’s just 10 days until the first preview of their new musical, “Up Here,” at La Jolla Playhouse, and the pressure is on.

This is, after all, their first major project on the heels of the blockbuster Disney film “Frozen,” for which they won an Academy Award for the ubiquitous anthem “Let It Go.” That Oscar sits on an unassuming shelf in the basement of their Brooklyn home, alongside their Emmys, Grammys, and Mr. Lopez’s Tony Awards for “Avenue Q” and “The Book of Mormon.”

Expectations may be high for their new musical, which starts preview performances Tuesday, but right now they’re scrambling to get to the summer camp recital of their daughter Annie, 6, to see her perform the Meghan Trainor song “Dear Future Husband.” Later that afternoon, their daughter Katie, 10, has a camp show of her own.

Read the entire article

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

Order Your Copy Now!

A History of Screenwriting – 31 in a series – Hilarious Posters (George Méliès, France, 1907)

A History of Screenwriting – 31 in a series – Hilarious Posters (George Méliès, France, 1907)

A History of Screenwriting - 31 in a series - Hilarious Posters (George Méliès, France, 1907)

A worker sets up his ladder, applies some glue and puts up a fresh poster for the Parisiana Hotel amid a wall of similar adverts (and covering over a bit of anti-police graffiti in the process) in this 1907 short. After the worker leaves the scene, the happy couple from the poster comes to life and steps onto the sidewalk. When two policemen come strolling by, the figures return to their inanimate state but then reemerge to harass a passing gentleman. Soon the police join the fray and rip down the offending Parisiana poster only to find that the whole wall will come down along with it. – Robert Avila 



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 68 in a series – Flat Out Farce

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

The only flat out farce ever attempted, “Fairy Tale” involved Mike in the challenging dual role of both Mike the cobbler and in drag as the Queen that Peter’s character worships. As part of the farcical element of the episode, Davy later played Little Red Riding Hood and Gretl while Micky played Goldilocks. No other episode breaks the fourth wall nearly as much from the cardboard sets to the stumbling delivery of dialogue to the anachronistic props that keep popping up.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition