Carrie Fisher’s “The Princess Diarist” [Book]

Carrie Fisher's

Thought I’d read Carrie Fisher’s “The Princess Diarist” for some frothy relaxing fun this weekend and found myself dazed by what a brilliant writer she was at 19. Her opening chapters are all from the recent past year (who knew it would be her last?) and sound like the distinct voice she became as a writer, but her journal entries from the filming of Star Wars are a distinct voice as well, capturing the thrill of obsessive first love better than many authors I’ve read (and I’ve read a LOT of them from Jane Austen to Judy Blume). 

The quality of the poem she wrote about her infatuation with Harrison (how nice to know she was as human as the rest of us and couldn’t resist the smuggler in the Cantina – AND that she had the opportunity to live our ALL our fantasies, so she “Tried not, she DID) will sadly be ignored — both for being written by a celebrity (hey, wasn’t F. Scott a celebrity?) and for being written by a young girl (hey, wasn’t Mary Shelley 19 when she wrote Frankenstein?).

I’d teach this book in a high school literature class if I was still teaching one. For now I recommend it as: ‘can’t put down even though I have scripts to read and grade’.

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How It All Began from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing, Book Soup, Hollywood [Video] (1:07)

This book signing at Book Soup was wonderful – good people, good conversation (before and after the signing). Just another example of the kind of quality positive people who have been drawn to The Monkees across generations – I even met a former head of publicity for ScreenGems who had some fun stories to tell. — Rosanne

Watch this entire presentation

How It All Began from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing, Book Soup, Hollywood

 

 

Transcript:

I started by writing an article for Written By Magazine which is the magazine of the Writers Guild and I’m on their board and I wanted a chance to meet some people so I recommended this idea and from that article, I then used that as the  proposal for the book company and that’s what they chose to let me continue it. So that was what was fun. Here’s the beginning part. 
I was a fan from the beginning. At the age of 6 when the show debuted on NBC and caused what I often teased was the first great choice of a childhood lived without the benefit of DVR. Should I watch The Monkees or Gilligan’s Island? Both aired at the same non-Bat Time on the same non-Bat Channel. I used that question as the thesis to an essay when many years later I applied to film school and I’m amazed how it still resonates with others of my generation. For my students, that choice harkens back to an unimagined time before VCRs, DVRs or iPads. When one had to choose between two favorite programs and wait for summer reruns to see if the one they hadn’t chosen was going to re-run and you could finally see that story.

Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

 

 

Women’s History Month – 12 in a series – Annie Oakley

Women's History Month - 12 in a series - Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley was renowned for her skill as a sharp- shooter and is said to be America’s first female super- star. She toured the United States and Europe in the phenomenally successful Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show. She was generous to charities, especially those assisting children, and despite several critical injuries continued as a record-setting exhibition shooter into her 60s. 

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 11 in a series – Mary Walker

Women's History Month - 11 in a series - Mary Walker

A surgeon for the Union during the American Civil War and the only woman to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, Mary Edwards Walker was born on November 26, 1832, in Oswego Town, New York. Her parents, Vesta Whitcomb and Alvah Walker, held 25 acres of land on which they grew fruits and vegetables for market. The family also kept a library for all five of their daughters to use. As a youth, Walker was interested in Spiritualism and supported abolition, temperance, and women’s rights, including suffrage.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 10 in a series – Julia Ward Howe

Women's History Month - 10 in a series - Julia Ward Howe

Writer Julia Ward Howe’s poem, set to music, became “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” the anthem for the Union cause in the American Civil War. While that piece cemented Howe’s place in American history, her writing career extended well beyond the single work, and with her efforts as an antislavery and women’s rights activist, she became a woman of great historical significance.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 9 in a series – Dorothea Dix

Women's History Month - 9 in a series - Dorothea Dix

Dorothea Lynde Dix was an activist in a variety of social reform movements. Her exposure to the dreadful conditions in U.S. prisons and consequent prison reform efforts led her to seek reforms for the mentally ill, particularly with regard to their treatment in asylums. She trained nurses during the American Civil War (1861–1865) but returned to asylum reform after the war.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Adapting Harry Potter from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:35)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting Harry Potter from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

Of course, I mentioned that we would talk about Harry Potter briefly. We could be here for a whole hours, 2, 3, 6 talking about all the Harry Potter adaptations. What I think is important to notice is, as you know, the book in England was called “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.” When it came to be published in America, they were afraid American children would look at the word philosopher and walk away, because that’s old and boring. That’s for old people. Of course, in America, what did we call it? The Sorcerer’s Stone, because a sorcerer is kind of cool — Mickey with hat — so we like sorcerers. We’re good. I mean that’s and adaptation made our publication people just to sell more books. 

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

On YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator’s Corner Season 2 Episode 4

On YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator's Corner Season 2 Episode 4

Watch YouTube: Defacing coins like a suffragette | Curator’s Corner Season 2 Episode 4

I liked this video and think you might find it interesting, too!

Women’s History Month – 8 in a series – Maria Mitchell, Astronomer

Women's History Month - 8 in a series - Maria Mitchell, Astronomer

Maria Mitchell was the first American astronomer to discover a telescopic comet—a comet too far away to see with the naked eye but detectable with a telescope. For her achievement, she was rewarded with a gold medal by the king of Denmark, became the first female member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and later became a professor at Vassar College, one of the first exclusively all-women colleges in America.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

From The Research Vault: Daydream Believers: The Monkees’ Story. Canada: World International Networks.

Yet another research resource for Why The Monkees Matter

Daydream Believers: The Monkees’ Story. Canada: World International Networks.

From The Research Vault: Daydream Believers: The Monkees' Story. Canada: World International Networks.

Braunstein, Harold (Producer) & Kearnley, Neill (Director). (2000)


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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Previously in Out of Research Vault: