Danny Pink and Fatherhood from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity [Video Clip] (0:49)

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents “How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library. Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

Watch the entire presentation here

Danny Pink and Fatherhood from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity

 

Transcript:

Now we go back to Danny Pink. Danny we don’t get a chance to see do the whole Dad thing, but we see a few things. First of all, what’s his job when he’s not being a soldier? He’s a teacher. So, we define again teacher as a gendered kid of job. We generally see women int he education field. Especially when it’s in middle school, elementary school, a few more guys in high school, but largely we see that as a female job, because it’s about nurturing a younger generation of people. So, as a teacher we see him protective of the children in his care. He is their pseudo-father when they are at school with him and I think that’s really important. That’s how Danny is defined for us. We see him first as this and then we hear about the warrior — oh yeah, he was a soldier. So his first definition is this. 

A clip from this 5th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who presented by Dr. Welch. You can find Dr. Welch’s other Doctor Who talks using the links below.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch on the Web and via social media at:

Saved By Fatherhood from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity [Video Clip] (1:35)

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents “How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library. Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

Watch the entire presentation here

Saved By Fatherhood from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity

 

Transcript:

One of my favorite episodes to do with family and fatherhood is the episode where James Corden guest starred as Craig Owens and his job was to take care of his baby and he was very bad at it. How many people have seen this episode? How cute it Stormageddon? I have a question for…of course, James Corden from “Into The Woods” right now and he’s also on his TV show, but what’s great about this episode is what saves his life? Does being a warrior save his life? Does being super-intelligent save his life? When the Cybermen show up and turn him into a Cyberman — which have never seen anyone undo. Once the Cybermen get you, you are done and the poor Doctor has to do that emotion inhibitor thing and suddenly you feel emotions and you blow up. it’s the only way to kill you once your a Cyberman. Except for him. He breaks the bond of “cyber” because he hears his baby cry and his need to save his child is stronger then the pull the Cybermen have on him in this metal casket that they’re creating around him. If that’s not a Dad, I don’t know what is. If that’s not a man who defines himself by his fatherhood, I do not know what is. So, I thinks a really interesting again, turn, in the modern Who. This is how Steven Moffat is defining masculinity as men who love their families. That’s the highest calling that a man can be brought to. 

A clip from this 5th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who presented by Dr. Welch. You can find Dr. Welch’s other Doctor Who talks using the links below.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch on the Web and via social media at:

Rory Williams – Family Man Part 3 from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity [Video Clip] (1:14)

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents “How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library. Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

Watch the entire presentation here

Rory Williams - Family Man Part 3 from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity

 

Transcript:

So Rory is a reflection of modern day fathers and what women are looking for ina modern man, if they’re going to spend the rest of their life. You want somebody else who’s going to help you clean the toilet. Right? When you get married, it’s not just you cooking dinner every night. It’s a shared job. It didn’t use to be. I had a friend who would go to work, her husband got home an hour before she did. He would sit on the couch and wait for her to get home and start making dinner, ’cause dinner was her job. Yeah, yeah. So things have switched around and the show is reflective of that. I think that’s really beautiful. And, of course, we know who the baby grew up to be. River Song! Who allows us a family of “Ponds”, even though they were stripped of the chance to raise her. We now have a Pond family as part of The Doctor’s story and again Rory overlooking all of that. He had to deal with his feelings of losing his chance to raise his child. That was something that harmed him, more than all the danger. How many times did Rory die. Really now. All those deaths didn’t bother him nearly as much as being denied the chance to raise his own child. So, I think that defines him much more deeply as a family man above all other things.  

A clip from this 5th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who presented by Dr. Welch. You can find Dr. Welch’s other Doctor Who talks using the links below.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch on the Web and via social media at:

My Favorite Book of Letters Between Writers, Cheever’s Glad Tidings

glad-tidings

Answering another friend’s Facebook post reminded me today of one of my favorite books of letters between writers is between Cheever and John Weaver.

I stumbled upon Glad Tidings: A Friendship in Letters : The Correspondence of John Cheever and John D. Weaver, 1945-1982 many years ago at a used bookstore and deeply enjoyed reading how these two writers discussed their work and the origins of their most famous projects.

Of course, Cheever was also writing to Harriet Weaver but the editors left her name off the title, so it’s also a good look at how the Weaver marriage operated (in the same way The Letters of S.J. Perlemnan became a look at the marriage of Dorothy Parker and Alan Campbell since he wrote so often to them).

What I enjoyed most was the inside look Cheever gave of coming to Hollywood when a studio adapted his story The Swimmer into a film – Weaver had much more experience living in Los Angeles as a writer of local histories so he helped Cheever navigate La-La-Land.

If you don’t know either of these writers, a selection of Cheever’s short stories, The Stories of John Cheever, won the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (not too shabby) and John D. Weaver’s obituary in the Los Angeles Times tells you how important he was: “Weaver wrote two novels and eight nonfiction books, including one that helped change history: “The Brownsville Raid,” a 1970 book that led to the exoneration of 167 black soldiers who had been discharged without honor 64 years earlier.”

Both are well worth reading – as is Glad Tidings. Check them out.

Who wrote The Monkees? – “Success Story” by Bernie Orenstein

Who wrote The Monkees? – “Success Story” by Bernie Orenstein  Part 1 of an on-going series

The Monkees episode Antenna TV will air this weekend is “Success Story” – written by Bernie Orenstein, a freelancer who wrote two other episodes:  “Dance, Monkee, Dance” and “Monkees à la Carte”.

monkees-success-story-2 monkees-success-story-1

This 5 minute interview  focuses on his memories of writing for The Monkees .  

His more full time writing was on the variety show The Hollywood Palace which showcased Hollywood talent such as Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby.  He later produced Sanford and Son.  In our interview I asked Mr. Orenstein if he was part of the youth culture and he said with a laugh, “My wife accuses me of missing the sixties entirely, and I’m afraid she’s right. I avoided the ‘emerging counter-culture scene’ mostly because I didn’t know there was one going on.” He has taught in the MFA program for Writing and Producing Television at Long Island University in Brooklyn. 

Read more about the writers of “The Monkees” own this article for Written By Magazine – Hey, Hey They Wrote the Monkees!

Writtenby monkees

Rory Williams – Family Man Part 2 from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity [Video Clip] (1:08)

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents “How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library. Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

Watch the entire presentation here

Rory Williams - Family Man Part 2 from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity

 

Transcript:

Of course, along the way, he gets to be a full family man because…he and Amy have a baby! I think it’s very important. There’s a photography of him holding his child. It’s not just her always holding the baby and taking care of it, this is a shared parenting which is part of the modern generation. You all are probably lucky. Your Dad’s were probably more involved, but if you get back to my generation’s Dad, there the folks that went to work, came home, had dinner, watched TV qnd never talked to their kids and that was what men did. Right? And over the course of a couple of generations, parenting has become a co-job and you can see a Dad just as easily taking his kid to the doctor or going to a school function and helping out. it’s become a definition of men in this new generation to be family caretakers — to be involved — to go to the soccer games even if their not coaching , right? And to go to the birthday parties at school when you have to hand out little cupcakes with candles in them. That’s become a new definition, right? You  all are probably more used to that, but it’s not something that happened in the past. 

A clip from this 5th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who presented by Dr. Welch. You can find Dr. Welch’s other Doctor Who talks using the links below.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch on the Web and via social media at:

The Vagina Monologues 2016 – Rosanne performs “The Flood”

The Vagina Monologues 2016 – Rosanne performs “The Flood”

Rmw vagina monologues 2016

On Tuesday February 16th the Women’s Resource Center of CalPoly Pomona presented their 15th annual performance of Eve Ensler’s “Vagina Monologues“.

My colleague Peg Lamphier and I joined a cadre of talented students in performing one monologue together.  Then a student dropped out and the director asked me to cover for her so this is my rendition of a monologue entitled “The Flood”.  It came from Ensler’s extensive interviews with women over the age of 65, many of whom were not able to say the word ‘vagina’ out loud.  

The best thing about the evening (besides ‘acting’ on stage again!) was watching all the students create a bond over the material – and watching those who had sat shyly in the back of some of my classroom discussions suddenly shouting “Vagina!” or impersonate moaning… We had to stifle our laughter backstage during most of the show.  But seeing all these female students become sisters through theatre was the best.

Link: Cal Poly Pomona Women’s Resource Center

Finding Diversity in Television History in the David Dortort Archive at the Autry Museum

Today we thank Shonda Rhimes for bringing color blind casting to television when she casts a diverse array of ethnicities in lead roles on her shows.  But she didn’t invent the idea.  On our visit to the Autry Museum of the American West I was reminded of a show I used to watch on television but that disappeared too quickly (I didn’t then know why) and didn’t reappear in reruns as much as the more successful, longer-running program also created by the same writer (Bonanza).

1968-TV-099-TheHighChaparral

 

The show I only vaguely remembered was The High Chaparral – the story of a Mexican woman married to a man of European descent (then controversially considered an inter-racial marriage) who owned a rancho in the West post the Civil War.  I remembered it for its diverse cast and honest portrayal of the discrimination played out against minorities in the West.

Special Projects Archivist Mallory Furnier wrote the blog post, “Casting Actors as People” highlighting the archives of The High Chaparral in the David Dortort Archive, where she noted:

“Though The High Chaparral faced untimely cancellation, its four seasons embodied a step away from tired, inaccurate stereotypes and a movement toward greater respect for actors and characters, regardless of race. As a June 16, 1970 NBC memo instructed, “let’s cast actors to play people and, in so doing, give the ‘minorities’ a break.”

hc-cast

In a second blog post, “Finding Aids and Places”,  Furnier discussed her trip to the Old Tuscon Studios in Arizona, site of some of the exterior filming of the show.

As always, I found it fascinating to wander around in the papers (old, handwritten first drafts of scripts, typed rewrites ready for production meetings, cast lists, shooting schedules, etc) and see the inside ideas of a show I had only seen from the outside all those years ago.

One of the papers was even a 1971 letter to Dortort from then U.N. Representative George H. W. Bush saying he sympathized with the producer over the cancellation of such a quality show and would do what he could to communicate that to those who had made that decision.  Fascinating.

Listen to the High Chapparal Theme Song.

High Chapparel script cover

High Chaparral Script Cover

 

Rory Williams – Family Man from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity [Video Clip] (1:13)

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents “How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library. Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

Watch the entire presentation here

Rory Williams - Family Man from How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity

 

Transcript:

How can we not talk about Rory when we talk about family men. Rory being, before Danny, the most recent male to travel with The Doctor. Think about Rory. We meet him and what’s his profession? He’s a nurse. He’s not a doctor. He’s a nurse. That is gender-traditionally a female job. So we have Rory who’s a nurse. That’s a definite choice.  Right? Macho is not nurse, except maybe 20 years form now. And yet, when Amy keeps getting the chance to choose between men – ooo The Doctor or Rory — she continually chooses Rory. Who, to her, is the manliest man, because he’s dedicated to her and their family. In fact, as we know, he’s so dedicated to her, he spends 2000 years guarding the Pandorica to keep her safe. 2000 years waiting to make sure no one can harm her. You can’t get better than that and that makes him a Warrior, as well, but a Warrior for the purpose of protecting a member of his family. That’s how deeply a family man he is and I think that is so cool.  

A clip from this 5th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who presented by Dr. Welch. You can find Dr. Welch’s other Doctor Who talks using the links below.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch on the Web and via social media at:

Screenwriting History Books: The Books I Use to Teach Screenwriting History

Here are some of the books I use to teach the History of Screenwriting in the MFA in Screenwriting Program for Stephens College. I’ll touch base on each of these books individually – their strengths and weaknesses (as I see them and as the students have reported them to me in class discussions) over the next few of weeks.

What are your favorite screenwriting History books?  It’s a trick question because few film history books focus on screenwriting.  They mostly focus on business moguls, directors and actors. But because this is an MFA in Screenwriting, the program Director, Ken Lazebnik, and I decided the writers who come through the program ought to have a deep understanding of the screenwriters who came before them.

Screenwriting books